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  • BaalSechel
    Participant

    Very inspiring. Do you (or that friend) know where this Kedushas Levi is located?

    in reply to: KOSHER-SWITCH #1075209
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Shabbos Switch is a terrible idea. Can we turn on an oven, or any other appliance at will. Just think, you can now have fresh food, for your Shabbos day meal. Wait til the video for that one comes out, depicting how boring chulent is, or showing mouth- watering, fresh foods cooked shortly before the meal, using SHABBOS OVENtm. Only one thing apropriate about this is its name – They are about put Shabbos on the off position. I have no doubt that many Rabbonim will be coming out against it shortly.

    in reply to: Mind-blowing statement from the Iben Ezra #977622
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Jewishness,

    How do know it to be true? Perhaps Ibn Ezra was referring to a specific time and place.

    in reply to: Stoning of an adulterers #903554
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Let’s all look at this from its broader perspective. Hashem has two basic modes of coducting the world: 1) When His presence is obvious, such as in the days of the Bais haMkdash, when there were daily miracles. 2) When his presence isn’t obvious.

    Corresponding to that, He engineered two modes of society 1) when people find Him on their own 2) when society holds each other to a basic level of commitment.

    Only the second society can be on the level that merits His revelation. The first, however, affords the indiidual the oportunity for making it on his own.

    We have only seen the first type of society, so we cannot judge what the second looks like.

    in reply to: Stoning of an adulterers #903547
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Bais Din has the discretion to do whatever it takes to keep society functioning. It depends on the needs of the generation. I am only discussing the Torah obligation that doesn’t change based on the needs of the generation.

    in reply to: Stoning of an adulterers #903545
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Iced: That’s correct, they would not be punishable by Bais Din. The amount of time is just a few seconds.

    in reply to: Stoning of an adulterers #903540
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Adams,

    It is important to understand the basic concept of the Torah obligaiting us to administer capitsl punishment for people who violate certain egregous sins. The Torah prescribes a very unlikely scenario that must occur, before we actually put someone to death. The two witnesses must warn the person, within seconds of the sin being committedthat if they go through with the sin they will be killed by Bais Din (the Jewish court). The person must respond to the witnesses that he is going to do it anyway. Obvoiusly, this is a highly unlikely scenario. Rav Chaim Voloziner explains that the reason people would respond affirmatively to the death warning is because they crave proper atonement for their uncontrollable sin.

    Maharal explains that the punishments of the Torah are not meant to be a practical deterrent to sin. That is the task of Bais Din in each generation.

    Rather, the Torah mandates a death penalty in order to represenet the totality of what human activity should entail, which includes punishing those liable for punishment. However, it is not intended as being a prctical deterrent.

    in reply to: I just got my Licence #896135
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    You should have in mind, every time that you drive, to fulfill the command of ‘Lo Sirtzach’. Hatzlazcha, and safe driving!

    in reply to: Eid passuled because of Iphone #895174
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    I think the comparison to the the Gemara that we assume the person did Teshuva is amusing. 1 who says this is a Talmid Chochom? Most people aren’t. 2 Just having an unfiltered Iphone, which has been decried by all Gedolei Yisroel as leading to terrible nisyonos, is both an aveira, and a chilul Hashem (it makes such an act “acceptable” to society).

    Probably the Rosh Yeshiva knew this fellow did not have a filter.

    If all Roshei Yeshiva would follow his lead, it would help diminish one of today’s biggest nisyonos.

    in reply to: AFTER MOSHIACH COMES: Will people die? #893587
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    It is a machlokes Rishonim. See Yeshaya 65:20, and the meforshim there (Rashi, Mahari Kara Radak) see also Beraishis Rabbah 26:2.

    BaalSechel
    Participant

    I assume that everyone invoking the concept of moser is joking. Going to arkaos has nothing to do with mesira. It is a violation of “asher tosim lifneihem”.

    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Just a quick question: Did you speak to your nieghbor nicely? Did you point out to him that he is protruding into your property? Perhaps he is willing to provide some sort of financial compensation that you can both agree upon. I have a lot of expeience in dealing with Choshen Mishpat, and often the solutions that leave most people happy are calm, negotiated ones (never let yourself be rushed into a solution; you will only regret it). If you have a wise Rav with experience, he may be able to help come up with an acceptable deal. Don’t forget, at the end of the day you two will still be neighbors, possibly for the rest of your lives. You owe it to yourself to deal with this in a calm manner, being as friendly as the situation allows for.

    in reply to: ??? ???? ??? – A Thank You to Women! #1180347
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    On a lighter note: When I was a bochur in Yeshiva, I thought to myself that all my needs are taken care of by the Yeshiva except for laundry. The only benefit to me from having a “helper” will be the laundry, that I will finally not have to do.

    When I married my ayshis chayel, she was so busy finishing school and working full time to support me, that she didn’t have time to do my laundry. Part of me (an insignificant part) thought, “so what did I get out of marriage?”

    in reply to: OLYMPICS/MOSHIACH? #886371
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    I feel compelled to respond to mistaken words of the poster who intimated that c”v we should be davening for Moshoiach’s non coming.

    The fact is that each one of us will be asked one day “Tzipeeso L’Yeshuah”. If a person can’t answer in the affirmative, he has failed in his mission on this world (see the Gemara carefully).

    The Rambam writes ??? ?? ????? ???? ?????? ??? ?? ??? ????? ???

    The Brisker Rav infers that even one who believes that Moshiach will come, but he doesn’t look forward to it, is included.

    Let’s take a step back. What this means is that the relationship that we are expected to have with Hashem is one that includes our yearning for the relevation of His glory. Without that component of the relationship, there does not exist a relationship that Hashem cares for.

    Like every other facet of avoda, it may take a lot of work to get there, but what Hashem expects is for us to work on it.

    As for that posters quoting Medrashim as to the survival rate, the Rambam says that we won’t know what any of them mean until we get there.

    But to use it to scare people away from one of the most basic facets of lfe is certainly wrong.

    This is the time of year to focus on this particular avoda, each according to their abilities.

    in reply to: Can someone with unfiltered internet be a ???? ?????? #1134165
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Yichusdik: Let’s start by saying that my intent in what I wrote was to defend the legal ruling of the Be’er Moshe against the brazen words that you wrote. I had no intention of writing anything more. Any inferences you made that imply that by writing from a halachic perspective and not a “feeling one” I somehow am lacking “neshomo”, are completely misconstrued.

    Getting back to your points (which I didn’t address the first time because that wasn’t the topic): you ask about accepting tzedoko from a person who is unqualified to represent the Tzibur because he has unfiltered internet. Answer: there is no Halacha that prohibits allowing such a person the zchus of tzdaka, just as there is no halacha prohibitting him from getting an alia. Only from being a permanant shatz and shochet, as B”M says. The messageto to take home from this Halacha is the high standard that we must expect from someone who represents us to the Ribbono Shel Olam.

    As for your questioning why I don’t post about fair business practices or other problems, what you refer to as “my silence”, I actually rarely post about anything. I have precious little time for posting. Only the kavod of the Be’er Moshe, and seeing how none of the posters understood what he was saying, and yet were discussing his psak in a callous fashion, prompted me to write. My contribution towards promoting erlichkeit is advising the people who ask for my advice and psak about business dealings to be as erlich and yashrusdik as possible.

    in reply to: Can someone with unfiltered internet be a ???? ?????? #1134154
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    To answer Yichusdik: I’ll respond to your comments one at a time. The mechutzof who wrote that the Halacha is not like the Debriciner without reading what he says, is a true mechutzaf. The least he owes a great man like the Debriciner before dismissing his words, is to read what he says, look up the mar’eh mekomos, try to understand, and only then to express an opinion. This clown probabely didn’t spend a single minute before writing his chutzpa.

    Next, as far as Parhesia is concerned, kol bo’ei beiso probabely does not mean literally. If you look at the mekor in Shulchan Aruch that he quotes (which passuls anyone who sings inappropriate songs), the shulchan Oruch does not even stress the Parhesia aspect, only that it’s known.

    The next point you make, trying to say that TV (which technically the Shatz can control which shows he watches)is better than unfiltered internet, all I can say is B”H you don’t have a clue what is going on with the internet, so let’s leave it like that.

    Finally, the point about the Debriciner assuring shaving (like many Gedolei Yisroel did) has no relevance. Shaving is a major shaila, with many gedolim weighing in on both sides, and the accepted minhag of America is to permit it. I am unaware of anyone disagreeing with this psak. If you can come up with a name, kol hakavod. We can then take it from there.

    Lastly, I don’t understand why you are so vexed about this issue.

    It’s a matter of psak Halacha. Just analyze the Shulchan Aruch, go through the sugya, and follow the Halacha. I find it especially surpising that people are weighing whether the Halacha governing who is qualified to represent klal Yisroel as a shatz is worth it from a shalom perspective. Is kashrus worth it? What about Chol Hamoed? Halacha is Halcha; learn it properly, and follow it!

    in reply to: Facebook #890862
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    That’s like asking what is so bad with smoking only one cigarette a day? It’s actually not dangerous per se. But the chances of veering off course (and smoking more than one a day, or engaging in spiritually ruinous activities on fb) are excellent, unfortunately.

    in reply to: Can someone with unfiltered internet be a ???? ?????? #1134140
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    It seems that no one who posted knows how to learn a Be’er Moshe (especially not the mechutzof who undertook to argue on him whithout reading what he says). The Debriciner is discussing a shul whose permanant Shliach Tzibbur has a television at home. He says that since the Shulchan Aruch (Rem”a) says that the halacha is that we warn, and then remove a Shliach Tzibbur who sings inapropriate songs, all the more so we must get rid of a shliach tzibbur who is known to have a TV in his home. He adds that one may not daven in such a shul if they don’t remove him. He is not discussing at all whether such a person may occasionally daven for the amud.

    I agree with the OP that anyone with unfiltered internet is certainly no better than one who has a TV, and that such a person may not be retained by the tzibbur to be their official shatz. He also says that if a person’s aquaintances know it is considered common knowledge.

    in reply to: No More Yeshiva World News :( #876539
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Actually, the speeches of the asifa (I was there and I understand Yiddish) said that anyone who needs it for panossa may have it, but only with a filter set as strongly as possible for their particular needs, and in consultation with his Rav. Anyone that doesn’t need it shouldn’t have it. YWN is on my whitelist. It’s not a perfect site, but it’s closer than most.

    in reply to: Halacha of Clicking On An Ad on a Webpage #875981
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Of course it’s Mutar. The advertiser has no expectation whatsoever that the only people clicking on his ad intend to buy. He probably prefers that you click anyway just on the off chance that you may change your mind. But regardless, It’s his choice to pay every time someone clicks. If you want to put it in Halacha terms, since the minhag hamedina is that people click on ads indiscriminately, that is kovea that his intention is to allow it.

    in reply to: SOLD OUT #873118
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Boruch Hashem!!! I know one of the people who worked tirelessly in the initial planning stages (it may even have been his idea. I am not sure). When you act Lesheim Shamayim great things happen!

    It’s about time that this was on peoples minds as a back burner issue, and is taking its right place on the front burner. This Asifa will make history, like the original Agudas Yisroel Asifa. Kinnus LeTzadikim Tov Lohem Vetov Lolam.

    in reply to: Going off the Derech #1181250
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    You should absolutely not agree to it. The internet can be a portal to things much worse than bad chevra. Also, what is going to bind him to his word and not go back to the chevra. In three months he’ll be back with them regardless.

    in reply to: Going off the Derech #1181248
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    I heard of a great camp called project extreme where they have a lot of hatzlach with such kids. It may be worth your time to check them out.

    in reply to: Harav Hagaon R' Chaim Pinchas ZTVK"L!! Please share stories about him #867966
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    When I was a bochur learning in Beth Medrash Gevoha,I was once in the library, and I overheard someone saying the following story (about himself). After many years trying unsuccessfully to have a child he went to Rav Scheinberg for a Brocha. Rav Scheinberg asked him his maaser money (I don’t remember if he said some or all) to his kollel, which this person agreed to do. Very shortly thereafter, as he put it, “the yeshua came”.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125170
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Thought on Parshas Tetzaveh:

    Parshas Tetzaveh is the only one that omits Moshe’s name. The Ba’al HaTurim gives the reason as stemming from Moshe’s request of Mechaini Noh Misifrecha, erase me from Your book (the Torah). The question is why this Parsha?

    Answer: Although Parshas Terumah discusses the commandment to build the Mishkan, it is Parshas Teztaveh that discusses Hashem’s promise that He will descend with His Shechina, and santify the Mishkan. Subsequently the Jews will know (to an unprecedented degree) that He has taken them out of Mitzrayim.

    The Midda (character trait) that is the greatest prerequisite for the residing of the Shechina, is that of Anava, self effacement. About a ba’al gaiva, Hashem says “Me and him cannot dwell together” Midda Tova Merubah, we can infer that Hashem desires to dwell, so to speak, with an Anav. The highest expression of anava is mesiras nefesh, one who completely negates his own existence for that of his Creator. It is this mechaini noh of Moshe Rabbeinu that enabled the permanant Hashroas Hashechina within klal Yisroel in the Mishkan.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125168
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Short thought on Parshas Mishpatim:

    You shall not corrupt the judgement of your evyon (indigent) in his judgement.

    Why does the Torah refer to an evyon as YOUR evyon.

    On a simple level, we are enjoined to take responsibility for the poor.

    In a broader sense we should view the tribulation of the poor as our own.

    However, it goes much deeper. The Torah says that there will never cease to be an evyon from the midst of the land. That means that if we are not poor it is only because another person has been created to fill that role.

    The Vilna Gaon (commentary on Rus)says that the sole reason that there is uneven wealth distibution in the world is to enable giving charity.

    Thus, in a deeper sense he is OUR evyon; he is the one whose existence enables our wealth.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125165
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Brilliant insight from the Gerer rebbe, the Imrei Emes:

    Rashi: Yisro is Yeser, with the letter vav added. The reason it was added is because Yisro added a Parsha to the Torah, the Parsh of “And you shall see..” (the advice about appointing judges).

    Asks the Imrei Emes: the begining of the Parsh that Yisro added is “it is not good..you will surly become exhausted…” (Yisro started by pointing out the existing problem).

    Answers the Imrei Emes: Anyone can point out that there is a problem. The gadlus is to advise a workable solution!

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125164
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Short thought on Parshas BeShalach, heard from Rav Elya Svei, Zatzal.

    Rashi describes the impassioned prayers that Klal Yisroel davened at the Yam Suf, as “they held on to the craftsmanship of their (fore)fathers”

    The Yidden were surrounded on all sides; the Mitzrim hot on their trail, the depths of the sea before them. We can only imagine the desparate recognition that they had of being solely in Hashem’s hand.

    That was the recognition that the Avos always had when they davened.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125162
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Beautiful Dvar torah, Baal Habooze.

    Thought on Parshas Bo.

    Paroh: Who is going out [to serve Hashem?]

    Moshe: With our children and elders we will go!

    Paroh: Only the men can go, for that is what you seek.

    Rashi explains that Moshe’s words always implied that only the men were going, as Paroh said.

    Why did Moshe change the terms in middle.

    The answer is that a Yid’s avoda is a link in an eternal chain. It is always flanked by both the previous generation, their exalted level of avoda, and the next generation, whose young eyes carefully observe the parents and rabbeim, giving them a sense of what true avoda means. Moshe was not changing his position, he merely clarified it.

    in reply to: Arguing with Rishonim and Achronim #1158336
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    If you have a difficulty with the words of a Rishon, look around to see if your issue is discussed by the Acharonim. If it is, see how they handled it. If it isn’t, chances are excellent that you don’t have a clear picture of the sugya. Your next move should be to figure out why.

    Ditto for prominent Acharonim whose words are dissected by the later generations.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125160
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Short thought on Parshas V’Eira: The medrash says that Paroh’s reaction to the first two makos was one of derision, as his magicians were able to replicate the makoh. Only by kinnim did he discover that they were unable to replicate the makoh.

    The question is, why not start with kinnim? Why bother with the other two?

    The answer lies in human phsychology. Had Paroh been exposed to makas kinnim initially, he would have been unable to deride the makos. Once he already derided the original makkos, even the discovery of kinnim did not cause him to change his position.

    Many people today pride themselves on being “rationalists”; people who only beleive what they see with their eyes. Once such a person has staked out their position,even when confronted with evidence that runs contrary to their position, they will develop outlandish theories, and be impervious to common sense, since their initial position has already been formed.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125157
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Short thought on Parshas Shemos: When Shifra and Pu’ah feared the Almighty, He made for them houses.

    Rashi brings from the medrash that He built them houses of Priesthood, and houses of Monarchy.

    Priesthood from Shifra, Monarchy from Pu’ah. The question is if they both acted similarly, why did they establish different types of houses?

    The Medrash describes Shifra as one whose deeds were upright (Shifra from Leshaper)and she would straighten the child. Pu’ah would fight Paroh, and awaken the child when people considered him dead.

    The function of a Kohen is to guide klal Yisroel when things are happening properly; it is the function of the king to fight their enemies, and awaken and compel people to accept Divine sovereignity, even when they don’t feel like doing so.

    Therefore, they each got rewarded based on their deeds and personality traits.

    in reply to: Very disturbing, please only kind people read. #842248
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    It sounds like you need advice from someone who has his head screwed on really straight, preferably someone who knows you/ your family. Is there a family Rav? Is he a person with Sechel (not everyone who has the title “Rabbi” is necessarily a Ba’al Eitza, but an awfully lot of them are Ba’alei Eitza). You can arrange to speak to him while your husband is out at work. Even if you have no family Rav, every city has prominent Rabbonim with much life’s experience that you can speak to. Which city are you from? (only answer this last question if there are thousands of frum Yidden in your city, to protect your identity)

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125156
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Short, beautiful thought on Vayechi, heard from Rav Yitzchok Gleizel, Rosh Yeshivas Yagdil Torah of Yerushalayim.

    Why is Parshas VaYechi a closed Parsha [No break between itself and Parshas Vayegash]? To say that when Yakov passed on,the eyes and heart of the Yidden became closed from the difficulty of the servitude (Rashi).

    The nature of difficulty is that it causes one to become completely self absorbed in his own difficulty, to the point that he is oblivious to what happens to his neighbor. That is what is meant by “the closing of the heart and the mind”.

    Geula, slavation, is the opposite. By Moshe it says, “he gave his eye and his heart to see the difficulty of his friend”. That is the harbinger to true freedom from Golus.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125152
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Thought on Parshas Vayegash: “And Yakov sent Yehuda before him to Goshen, Lehoros”. Rashi explains that means to establish a yeshiva. The question is why Yehuda and not Levi, who represents the bearers of Torah, Yoru Mishpatecha L’Yakov?

    Answer: There ae two types of talmidei chachomim. One is someone who stands above the yetzer hora (i.e. his yetzer is of limited strength), immersed in learning to the extent that there is little for the yetzer to do. The other is one who needs to vanquish his powerful yetzer, and does so successfuly. Levi represents the former, Yehuda the latter (see dvar torah about parshas Toldos).

    One who has experienced, and overcome, the enticements of the yetzer can much more easily relate to the next generation, and help them overcome their difficulties. It is he who should become the next generations Rosh Yeshiva, helping others to accomplish what he has accomplished himself.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125150
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Short thought on Miketz/ Shabbos Chanuka:

    Both Chanuka and Purim are alluded to in the seuda that Yosef ate with his brothers. ????? ??? ???? contains the word Chanuka. Yosef gives five changes of attire to Binyamin, signifying Purim. The question is, what is the connection of this seuda with Chanuka and Purim?

    The Seforim (see Pri Tzaddik) explain that Yosef represented the Shechina, and the Shevatim represented Klal Yisroel.

    Let us conjure up an image of this Seuda. The Shevatim are still separated from Yosef, not fathoming who he really is.

    Yet within the state of separation a bond takes place – they enjoy a seuda together, even drinking to the point of getting drunk, something they refrained from doing since the start of their separation.

    That is Chanuka and Purim. Still in Golus, still distant from the Shechina, yet able to celebrate some sort of bond within the shackles of Golus itself.

    This really speaks to us, in today’s generation.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125149
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Thanks Ba’al HaBooze

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125147
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Thought on Parshas Vayeshev:

    Yosef holds sinners liable, as he establishes that human nature is indeed stronger than his baser inclination.

    The question is that Yosef experienced the apperation of his father who showed him the potential he has of being on the efod. How can this possibly apply to other people.

    The answer is that every person has the ability to be a unique being, unlike anyone who ever lived. In his/her specific area, all people have the ability, if they live their life correctly (which few do), to be truly unique.

    In the context of one- of – a – kind there is no difference between Yosef’s potential, or anyone else’s potential. They are both priceless (something that has no parallel has no limit on its value).

    This is enough to encourage all of mankind to overcome their smallness, precisely the way it did for Yosef.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125146
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Short thought on Parshas Vayishlach. Yakov says, “Kotonti MiKol HaChasadim etc.” the simple meaning is that I am unworthy of the good that you have dealt me. Rashi refuses to explain it like that, saying instead that “I have become small because of all the kindness etc. that you have performed on my behalf”. The question is that kotonti literally means I have become small. According to Rashi’s explanation it should say niskatnu zechuyosai, or something to that effect.

    The answer is that ultimately a person is nothing more than his zechuyos. Only they have true significance, and in the ultimate sense only they define the true essence of a person’s being.

    I once heard from Rav Moshe Shapiro shlit”a that people have a mistaken notion of Olam Habba. They think that resembles Olam Hazeh, only they they will be a bit frummer. Actually, Olam Habbah is a place where a person has no existance beyond what they managed to create while in Olam Hazeh.

    This is actually quite a sobering thought as to how we view the pursuit of mitzvos. We are doing nothing less than defining our eternal existence.

    Getting back to the Parsha, this is what Yakov was saying I have become smaller because of my zechsim having been consumed. Yakov, the Av who represented the ultimate, eternal truth, viewed his existence as nothing more than his zechusim.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125143
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    She would not have been Rochel Imeunu had she witheld the simanim from Leah.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125141
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Short and beautiful thought on Veyeitzei tht I heard from Rav Yitzchok Gleizel shlit”a, Rosh Yeshivas Yagdil Torah in Yerushalayim.

    We are accustomed to thinking that Rochel lost out by sharing the simanim that Yaakov gave her, with her sister. She could have been the sole progenitor of klal Yisroel, yet her sister took the lion’s share.

    In reality the opposite is true. Rochel was an akkara. She would not have had any of the Shevatim. The children that she did have was only Vayizkor Elokim… He remembered that she shared the simanim, as Rashi explains.

    Furthermore, Rashi brings Admon k’vot ki lo choloh etc., that she would have wound up by Esav.

    Ultimately, giving the simanim, far from being detrimental to her, was the source of everything she had.

    in reply to: torah, bechira, choice #917817
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    You are asking one of the deepest questions that the Rishonim discuss. Basicly, the world exists on two dimensions. One is from our perspective, one is from His. In our perspective there is total bechira, with nothing dictating our choice.

    There is another dimension to existance, that transcends our understanding, in which we don’t really exist, we are merely expressions of His Unity. In that dimension, He knows our choices. However, just as we can’t fathom Him, we can’t relate to such a concept of existance,

    Rav Aryeh kaplan compares it to seeing the same thing from different lenses of eyeglasses.

    As I said ealier, the Rishonim (see Rambam in Hilchos Teshuva) say this is a most difficult concept to understand.

    Bottom line: to the extent that you exist the way you think you do, you have complete bechira. Use it wisely, and reap its rewards!

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125136
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    A short but extremely deep thought on Parshas Toldos.

    Obvious question: Why did Yitzchok intend to give the Brochos to Esav and not to Yakov.

    Answer: There were two Brochos. One of Rulership, intended for Esav. One of the Mesorah, the Birchas Avrohom, given to Yakov before he left to Choron.

    True rulership begins at home. Only someone with a powerful Yetzer Hora can experience true rulership. In a deeper sense, the term melech refers to a king that is chosen, as opposed to a Moshel, a dictator. It is the Yetzer Hora, who forces us to choose our relationship with G-d, as opposed to naturaly following Him.

    The stronger the Yetzer Hora, the greater of a choice we have, the greater meaning we give to G-d’s rulership upon his being vanquished.

    The point of a Jewish king is to reflect the Divine rulership in this world.

    Dovid Hamelech ultimately accomplished what Esav was supposed to have done. He was endowed with a mighty Yetzer Hora, which he overcame with unparalleled effort.

    Yitzchok knew that only Esav had in his lot this necessary prerequisite to rulership. He was right. However, by receiving Esav’s Brocha in his stead, Yakov absorbed Esav’s lot in addition to his own. His subsequent sojourn to Charan, to face the unprecedented exposure to the house of Lavan, forced him to combat evil in a manner previously unknown to him.

    When people said the big (Leah) for the big (Esav) they were correct. The Medrash Rabbah says that she, who containes the seeds of Davidic rulership, was predestined for Esav. Yakov, with his newfound role ultimately took even her.

    Bottom line. Every urge of the Yetzer Hora that we experience is an opportunity for true expression of Divine Rulership.

    in reply to: YWN Coffee Room Nightly D’Var Torah #1125135
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Actually, I heard it once from Rav Shmuel Kamenetzki many years ago. He may have said that it was a Pirkei D’Rabi Elozor, but he was definitely quoting a Medrashic source.

    in reply to: Schnoring at weddings #831252
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Miritchka: I don’t know why you blame the Meshulachim for the car parked illegally. They don’t own the car, they just hire a meshulach car service. You should blame the car owner, who should park legally after dropping off the Meshulachim.

    in reply to: davening/ learning in English #833324
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    “Hashem” is not a substitute for His name, as it merely translates as “the name”. “G-d” is a better word. Hatzlacha davening! You will find a new world open to you!

    in reply to: Schnoring at weddings #831240
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    One last thought: Rav Mendel Kaplan Zatal used to host outcasts, many of them with unpleasant body odor. His son asked him: why these people. He answered, “who knows how we appear to the Ribbono Shel Olam?”

    in reply to: Schnoring at weddings #831239
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Health: the Orach Tzedaka brings from Rav Elyashiv that you can hang a sign outside advising meshulachim as to when you are available to give Tzdaka. However, should you open the door and discover a meshulach there, you are obligated to give him.

    in reply to: Schnoring at weddings #831238
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Not to mention being grateful afterward: How many of us feel so grateful after receiving a handout, that we would recoil at the thought of the handout itself being used in a way that slights the Donor.

    Or the idea of entitlement. How many don’t have the expectation that they will be granted a handout. If they didn’t, their payers would be an inspiration to watch.

    in reply to: Schnoring at weddings #831237
    BaalSechel
    Participant

    Oot: Thanks for explaining what I meant. I wish you were right, but most people don’t exactly daven the way you described. Who can say that the thought of total dependency on the One they schnorr from permeates their entire being the way you describe. Many people don’t even realize that they are scnorring; asking for something that they need. Some, with a dizzying speed on their lips, have their mind fixated on their next business deals. Those same people tend to be the ones that complain loudest when the indigent ask them for a handout, with much more focus then they had at their last schnorring session.

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