Dr. Nat

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Viewing 37 posts - 1 through 37 (of 37 total)
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  • in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2018738
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    2 cents:
    I will allow you to reproduce the effects of my experience and I will not even charge you for it. And it would not be a chiddush anyway, as studies had already been conducted which demonstrated its efficacy.

    in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2018662
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Always Ask Questions: Thank you, but I really have no interest in getting into that deeper discussion (although I personal bend is certainly against the Covid Vaccines in general). I was just responding to the original poster’s question about whether or not there was any evidence of effectiveness of Ivermectin, being that I had personal anecdotal evidence of its success to share with the Tzibbur. And I definitely also have reason to believe that the effectiveness of Ivermectin is being covered up by the vaccine industry as well as the mainstream media. That’s all. I’m not responsible for this discussion getting sidetracked.

    in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2018644
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Always Ask Questions: Sorry, but that’s a bunch of baloney. Joe Rogan has already called out CNN on the carpet in an interview with Dr. Sanjay Gupta where he asked him why CNN reported that he was taking horse de-wormer when in fact he took a prescribed dosage of a medication whose inventor won the Nobel Prize. The good doctor had no reply.

    in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2018641
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    I posted a study earlier that showed success using Ivermectin with Acetylsalicylic acid. I also posted first-hand anecdotal evidence, i.e., that I personally took 2 doses of Ivermectin and had dramatic improvement in my altered and weakened sense of smell.

    in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2018530
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    2 cents,

    My point was that when disclosing side effects of a medicine, they are not “what happens when you overdose”. The side effects are real effects of taking actual prescribed dosages. My point was that they were taking a relatively harmless medication and trying to hype its danger by listing items other than side effects as side effects in an effort to scare people away from taking this otherwise harmless remedy. Got it?

    in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2018324
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    The Mahmud study–a CRT that explored ivermectin as an early treatment for 363 individuals–concluded that “patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 infection treated with ivermectin plus doxycycline recovered earlier, were less likely to progress to more serious disease, and were more likely to be COVID-19 negative on day 14. And Niaee’s research team found that ivermectin can help even hospitalized patients. That group conducted a “randomized, double-

    blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial” with 180 hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID-19. They concluded that ivermectin “reduces the rate of mortality and duration of hospitalization in adult COVID-19 patients,” and the improvement of other clinical parameters showed that the ivermectin, with a wide margin of safety, had a high therapeutic effect on COVID-19.

    in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2017886
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    There are more, but here’s one:

    https://zenodo. org/record/4065802#.YVriHCX3bDs

    Dangerous side effects of Ivermectin include nausea and vomiting IF YOU OVERDOSE. So basically, same as alcohol.

    in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2017863
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Yaakov Doe does not take penicillin because that is administered to horses, hence making it an animal medicine. For that matter he does not even drink water because that is a horse drink. He lives on Diet Coke. Just be careful, Yaakov, because it looks like all that caffeine has been getting to your head.

    in reply to: Ivermectin…? Proofs, risks? #2017797
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    My personal experience with Ivermectin:
    Since I caught Corona 1.5 years ago, my smell has not been the same. In the beginning, I could barely smell anything at all. As of a month ago, about 70 percent had returned, but there were also a number of things that I would smell incorrectly, meaning that I would register their smells as being different than before, and many things smelled bad, even though I enjoyed their smells pre-Corona. I got a doctor that I know to write me a prescription for Ivermectin, and after taking the two small doses that I received, my original sense of smell had returned. I could now smell things like Shabbos cooking in my home on Friday afternoon, paper (yes paper has a smell) and unfortunately the smell of other people’s body odor. You guys do the math.

    in reply to: to stay in Kollel ? #1935609
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    @charliehall

    It’s amazing that you make Torah learning a priority in your life, and hats off to you for having learned Shas twice plus 1/3 of Yerushalmi, but I hope that you don’t think that Daf Yomi in any way compares to the learning that the yungerleit do when learning full-time. It does not. Not in the slightest. Again, with all due respect to you and your accomplishments.

    in reply to: to stay in Kollel ? #1934189
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    To Catch Yourself:

    Um, Dr. Nat learned in Kollel for 15 years. I think it’s time that you got a new troll sniff-o-meter. And I’m definitely not a bored guy.

    in reply to: to stay in Kollel ? #1933926
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    I don’t know you personally, and I’m saying this as a general rule, but if you are at the point when you are thinking about leaving, then you already have a foot out the door and should be making plans to leave. That’s just the way it is from my (extensive) experience. Guys who are serious about staying in Kollel are focused and do not wonder if they should be leaving. IMHO.

    in reply to: White shirts a must? #1675920
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Yeshivos can do whatever they want, even if you don’t agree with or don’t understand their reasons. You are free not to go to a particular yeshiva and rather to go to a yeshiva that allows you to wear what you want. Or you can open your own yeshiva. It is a free county both ways.

    in reply to: Yeshiva Fundrasing using Cigar Rolling and Wine Tasting #1660897
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Chochma derecheretz:

    You are a soney Torah velomdeha. It is not the Yeshiva guys rolling the cigars. It is the baalei batim donors.

    in reply to: Time to Walk Away #1590135
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    YitzchokM,

    I am happy that you are concerned only with raising your children. Maybe you can share with me, once homosexuality and transgenderism become completely integrated and accepted within American society thanks to the politicians that you voted for, how you plan on raising your children in this society. Because you will not be able to shelter them.
    Being that your only consideration in chinuch seems to be how to get the government to pay for it, let me share with you a quote that I just heard in the name of a gadol of yesteryear (possibly Rav Leizer Yudel Finkel): The reason why frum families have children who do not follow in their ways is because they pay for their children’s chinuch with money that is unkosher. There is no better definition of this than your case of paying for your kids schools with vouchers obtained through the election of immoral politicians. Maybe you should think about that also.

    in reply to: Time to Walk Away #1589381
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    YitzchokM:
    No, we do not. We stand up for morality and vote for the candidate who is against gay rights even if he is against vouchers. We show the upright Christians and everyone else in the county that religious Jews actually have beliefs that they stand up for and we do not perpetrated the horrible chillul Hashem that you have suggested which is to sell ourselves out to the highest bidder who will take our society into the next level of the morass.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1320526
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    I knew that the letter was written generally. I also knew that it was written to Dr. Twersky. Nevertheless, there are a number of factors that might not apply today and to a specific person.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1320499
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Thank you for at least keeping this discussion on point. I would say that, in all deference to the Steipler ZTVK”L, it would be necessary for each person to get advice from a spiritual leader with whom he acquainted personally and who is alive today, and not use a letter that was written to another person thirty-some-odd years ago. Likewise, we all know what the Rambam says about a person working three hours a day and learning for eight. But how many people can actually live up to this and still support their family?
    To be perfectly honest, it is definitely a challenge to go through medical school. But many other career choices also fraught with challenges. I would put medical school in the category of Derech Aruka Shehi Ketzarah. Because once you get through it, it only gets easier throughout your life. This is something that you cannot say about a number of other professions.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1319998
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    DrYidd:

    Careful!!!
    Watch your language!!!

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1319972
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Mentch1
    Of course people should not call Hatzolah for stupid things. I’m not arguing with that. People need to be educated. I’m just talking about things which are truly questionable. I would assume anyway, that they would have non-Jewish dispatchers who would understand not to call a Jewish paramedic for a knocked-out tooth.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1319852
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    mentch1
    Obviously everyone should be well-versed in halacha. But what if someone is not. Or he is just not sure. And his kid has a safek pikuach nefesh or sakanas eiver. And his next-door posek is away for Shabbos. Would you tell him not to pick up the phone and call Hatzolah? If so, I’m sure many choshuva rabbonim would disagree with you.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1319657
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    The main problem is the people who spent the best years of their lives in kollel thinking that they were going to become the Rashkebehag, and then didn’t get the shteller they imagined they would get, and are now inwardly bitter people sitting in their basement in their undershirt (take that either literally or figuratively) half the day writing deios to the coffee room. They think that just like the Rambam and the Vilna Gaon understood everything about the secular world from Torah, they do too, and therefore they think that they know everything about everything, from physics to medicine to law, when they really know very little about anything.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1319316
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    If Rav Chaim Brisker Zt”l would have been around when someone called with safek pikuach nefashos, he would have run himself to be mechallel Shabbos. But you know more than he did. Maybe also think that if you scare people off from making the “stupid” phone calls, you will cause someone with a real issue not to call and get a life saved. Please go back and learn the halachos.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1319028
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Well I would definitely advise all frum doctors not to be mechallel Shabbos on PBA should the need ever arise. Lo Ro’uy Ze Lechallel Olov Es Hashabbos. We’ll find a nice goyishe doctor if one is around.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1318909
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    But PBA is a doctor. He also knows all the Jewish doctors. All from his basement in his undershirt. So who are you to argue with him?

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1318318
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Last time I checked, there were 613 Mitzvos.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1318297
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Point was that, similar to a number of other professions, difficult, but not impossible. Depends on level of commitment. And, let’s not forget, as with everything else, including learning in kollel, you need Yiras Shomayim. Or nothing will work.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1318292
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Good point. . .I guess I got caught up with the silly comment. . .

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1318283
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    This issue has been dealt with extensively in Halacha. And even if you hold it’s an issue, there are ways around it, admittedly with difficulty. Maybe we should also speak about the spiritual pitfalls of other professions, such as working in mixed offices and the like. Or of professions where monetary integrity is constantly being tested. Reminds me of the story of the shochet who came to R Yisroel Salanter and told him he wanted to be a shopkeeper. Why is everyone picking on doctors all of a sudden?

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1318273
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    It’s not lashon hara. It’s called shlechtkeit. Disparaging a noble group of people who don’t have the luxury of poofing away half of Shabbos like PBA because yidden in need of urgent medical help are constantly knocking on their doors. Kefiyas tova and kinah also. And I am not a doctor, BTW, despite my mom de plume.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1317853
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    On second thought, you wouldn’t even need a doctor. Just a vet.

    in reply to: Frum Doctors #1317847
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Boy, I sure hope you never need a doctor.

    in reply to: Ideas For Bachurim 💡👨 #1315492
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    From the amount of time you spend on this website, I would have to say that spending time in the YWN coffee room is more fun than figuring out a Tosfos. At lease for you.

    in reply to: Bachelors Degree #1315055
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    ColumbiaGrad please reread my comments. I was not extolling the virtues of the BTL. I was pointing out that a BTL, in certain situations, can be useful. Obviously not in every situation and not for every profession. But you can get into law school with it, as many have done. My main point was that a person should know why he is obtaining a Bachelor’s degree, and for what purpose. A standard Bachelor’s degree from a respectable secular institution is also worthless if someone wants to pursue a career as an engineer.

    in reply to: Bachelors Degree #1314923
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    And a BTL is not useless if you use it for what it can be used for, like getting into law school. People who post should really know what they are talking about before they post.

    in reply to: Bachelors Degree #1314922
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    I have a Bachelor’s degree. You don’t just “get” a Bachelor’s degdegree, especially if you have to pay for it. You decide first what you want to do for a living and then if you need it, you get a Bachelor’s degree. You need some guidance.

    in reply to: ????? ???? ???? #1009565
    Dr. Nat
    Participant

    Let’s pose the question like this:

    You love your teenage son. He wants something that he thinks is good for him, but you, with your wisdom acquired through twenty more years of life experience feel that this is the worst thing for him. Do you get it for him, or do you say, “I know what is best for you and I love you, and I believe that this is the worst thing for you, therefore I will not get it for you.” And if your answer is the latter, is a friend, whom one is required to love, different from a son? We are going with the assumption that we are dealing with someone who truly knows what is best for his friend, and not some phony friend whose judgment is clouded by negiyos.

Viewing 37 posts - 1 through 37 (of 37 total)