Curiosity

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Viewing 50 posts - 101 through 150 (of 910 total)
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  • in reply to: Kick em in the knee! #1370137
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Huju, YWN doesn’t allow links, but just google “police shootings by race”. There’s a great article by National Review, and another by the LA Times, if you lack faith in conservative news sources and desire liberal ones. There’s enough research out there on this topic to keep you busy for days. Also, I would humbly suggest that if you must spend your time worrying about dangerous groups, Muslim terrorists should be much higher on the worry list than the elusive Neo-Nazis.

    in reply to: Kick em in the knee! #1369655
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Of course they wouldn’t fire Villanueva, because the backlash would be enormous – he’s a former Army Ranger who wants to respect the flag, and it’s not an official team rule that he must remain in the locker room with his team during the anthem. However, if they did fire him it would be very interesting to watch the chaos that ensues. Much worse than ESPN removing Asian-American Robert Lee.

    in reply to: Kick em in the knee! #1368800
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Why must ye tell others what to saye? *Cough* ye *cough*

    in reply to: Kick em in the knee! #1368776
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Huju, I’m very curious how a liberal justifies the statistics which show no racism exists. White men are just as likely to be shot by police when the incidence rate is normalized over the incidence of police confrontation for violent crime. Meaning, if black men and white men commit the same rate of violent crime (which they don’t – statistically, black men are 3 times as likely to) then upon contact with the police there is no indication that the black man will be shot more frequently than the white man. What say ye?

    in reply to: Kick em in the knee! #1368507
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Also, this is not Trump’s fault. Kaepernick was kneeling while BHO was still in office.

    in reply to: Kick em in the knee! #1368506
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Akuperma. The players’ protest is not protected by 1st Amendment rights since they are on paid time. If their employer tells them to stand they must stand or he can fire them. Likewise, (unless it is buried somewhere in NFL contracts) the league can disqualify a team if they break rules. Apparently standing up for the anthem is not currently a rule, but the league has the right to include it as a rule. Make no mistake about it, the NFL is BIG BUSINESS, and these are business decisions, which is why liberal city teams (Seattle, New England, San Francisco, etc) support the players’ protests, while owners from less liberal cities (such as Jerry Jones on the Cowboys) are against it. They want to keep the financial support of their home towns.

    in reply to: URGENT Hurricane Irma: What happens if your window breaks? #1359240
    Curiosity
    Participant

    The problem with open windows/doors isn’t really the wind blowing in the house, it’s the pressure differential created by the wind going over your roof and around the corners of your home. If your door is open the incoming air also creates high pressure inside that can tear the roof off. Once the roof is gone, the walls are not as structurally sound because they are now only attached on 3 sides instead of 4, so they can more easily collapse, as well. That’s why homes designed for high velocity hurricane zones should have doors that open out from the structure. Good luck and good Shabbos!

    Curiosity
    Participant

    As bad as the political climate is under Trump, I would still rather have him than that sleazy Clinton because unlike her, he actually cares about the country. The only reason Trump’s presidency is in the shape that it’s in right now is because the Democrats didn’t even have the decency to give the man a chance. He started off well, but things fell apart with time under all the pressure from the obstructionist on the left, and now the Rinos.

    in reply to: Tight-fitting clothing and tznius – the elephant in the room #1337534
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Dear gadol hadorah, you are completely mixing up three different issues: Issur ervah, kavod hatorah, and the mitzvah of tzniyus. I would humbly suggest that, more importantly than learning the differences between the three issues, you should “man-up” and come face-to-face with the root causes that drive your continuous passive-aggressive bashing of halacha and frum males on a website catered for the people which you so clearly despise.

    in reply to: Tight-fitting clothing and tznius – the elephant in the room #1337378
    Curiosity
    Participant

    I’m glad to see that a secular court still respects a dress code. Gavriel613 – having zero tact or respect for appropriate dress code isn’t “a clear tzad”. Being dressed appropriately for the occasion is not a Jewish concept. This woman was not dressed appropriately for a court of law, and she was thus being directly disrespectful, whether by malice or ignorance, of authority. Not a good role model for a pre-teen. Even some fancy restaurants won’t let you enter in shorts or without a collared shirt.

    in reply to: Tight-fitting clothing and tznius – the elephant in the room #1336319
    Curiosity
    Participant

    @Gadolhadorah “Especially those whose social skills are limited based on not having grown up in gender-mixed school system and living in a heimeshe community,” … Wow…. How can you so broadly disparage and stereotype an entire community of people in the SAME SENTENCE as talking about being careful not to offend people? I guess you think respect is a one way street.

    in reply to: Tight-fitting clothing and tznius – the elephant in the room #1335373
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Rebbyidd, let’s not pretend men go to the shirt emporium and ask the clerk to direct them to the racks with the see-through shirts. It’s just that unfortunately the quality of the textiles of many white shirts isn’t what it needs to be, so when you are wearing white tzitzis with highly contrasting black stripes, they are easily seen through the white shirt material. But what does this have to do with anything?

    in reply to: Tight-fitting clothing and tznius – the elephant in the room #1335315
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Gadol hadorah, what source do you have that interprets that stained clothing on a talmid chacham is a matter of tznius? All classical meforshim understand this to be an issue of kavod hatorah.

    It’s ironic that some frum girls complain tsniyus is stressed for women more than men, and yet many a frum girl wears tops that show collarbone & forearms and skirts that reveal calves, while frum men typically don’t wear shorts, and rarely wear short sleeves or forego wearing a collared shirt in public.

    in reply to: Ubiquitin and Health are still at it! #1179648
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Lilmod – The reason is, in America, in order to retain tax exempt 501c3 status, an organization cannot advocate for one political candidate over another. Most gedolim’s organizations/shuls/yeshivahs are 501c3 and therefore cannot legally claim tax exemption and tell you who to vote for in a public, organization sanctioned forum. Nonetheless, daas Torah affects this decision too, and you can ask your LOR or LOGadol in a private forum.

    in reply to: Ubiquitin and Health are still at it! #1179646
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Please consult your LOR before casting a vote. With very strong emphasis on the O in LOR.

    Although, if you live in NY it probably doesn’t matter one bit who you vote for.

    in reply to: What to do with spilled Havdalah wine? #1139176
    Curiosity
    Participant

    For a second there, I thought I missed the answer to my question when I searched the CR archives before posting this question. I actually clicked on your link before realizing… Lol

    in reply to: What to do with spilled Havdalah wine? #1139174
    Curiosity
    Participant

    While I appreciate your responses, I’m asking about what to do after that with the wine that’s left over.

    in reply to: Is Zionism STILL the Yetzer Hora? #1133123
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Zionism shouldn’t be necessary if you observe mitzvas. Supplementing Hashem’s Torah with an -ism implies that the Torah’s philosophy is lacking in some way and needs supplementation.

    That being said, the Zionists who go pitch their tent in dangerous areas in Israel may be misguided, but they are our brothers and sisters and we are obligated to love them and help protect them from the Arabs who want to spill all Jewish blood.

    The bloodthirsty, savage, fascist, Islamic terrorists who go by the moniker “Palestinians” are the enemies of every Jew, and trying to appease them by throwing Zionist Jews into their claws and fangs will get us nowhere. Jewish sects who blindly teach their children to hate Zionists (and I’ve seen it too) are even more misguided than the Zionists.

    in reply to: Age Difference in Shidduchim #1097175
    Curiosity
    Participant

    19!?!? She’s but a babe! People need to live life on their own a little and learn what they want out of life before they get married. Imho, I don’t think driving from your high school graduation ceremony straight to your wedding is a good thing.

    in reply to: Frum Jews who Litter #1095809
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Non-biodegradable garbage definitely is not created by nature, nor is it being “returned” to nature when you litter.

    in reply to: cats in my yard #1092441
    Curiosity
    Participant

    I know exactly how to take care of your problem. *cracks knuckles*

    in reply to: Equalitianism and Judaicy #1091822
    Curiosity
    Participant

    In terms of economics: The Torah does not believe in the Communist or Socialist version of equality. Yes, each person has to pay a “tax” to benefit the poor, but this ma’aser is percentage capped and applies to everyone equally regardless of economic status. Chazal were very sensitive to personal property rights and deal only within the framework of capitalism. There is no judicial movement in Chazal to equalize everyone’s wealth – on the contrary, as some have already mentioned, a financial dispute is based on merits of argument alone, and not on how wealthy or poor the defendant/plaintiff may be relative to each other. Chazal also push for a free market society, but they place limits on usury, bribery, extortion, and dishonest dealings.

    In terms of gender equality: Both genders deserve equal respect, but they are strongly discouraged from trying to assume identical roles, in all areas of life (public, private, socially, politically, militarily, etc…).

    In short, I think equality as defined by society today is contrary to Torah beliefs.

    in reply to: iran bomb #1092751
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Can we please get back on topic… WE’RE ALL GONNA DIE!!!!!

    in reply to: We really do need to stop abusing animals #1091313
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Joseph, assuming it’s not someone else’s cat, and assuming you aren’t violating the law of the land, yes. It is permissible.

    in reply to: We really do need to stop abusing animals #1091302
    Curiosity
    Participant

    HaLevi – Mercy, yes, but “respect”? Do you have a source from Torah/Chazal of this concept of “respect” for animals, or is this just an emotional response? From a mussar perspective, you shouldn’t do anything that is outright disparaging to animals because it affects your character and will likely translate to humans too. However, is disrespcting an animal in a way that wouldn’t affect your middos still wrong? Not saying it isn’t; just asking.

    in reply to: We really do need to stop abusing animals #1091298
    Curiosity
    Participant

    RebYidd23, that’s a cop out answer unless you explain why it’s forbidden, but let’s say we didn’t genetically modify them, but someone else already did.

    in reply to: We really do need to stop abusing animals #1091295
    Curiosity
    Participant

    I know, I’m being metaphorical. I’m not trying to be biologically accurate. I just meant if the chickens were genetically modified to not feel pain… interesting shayla, I think.

    in reply to: We really do need to stop abusing animals #1091293
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Is it still tzaar baalei chayim if science figures out a away to genetically labotamise animals and make them not feel any suffering?

    in reply to: BT in need of help!!!! #1091193
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Melody, your story is beautiful, and your motivation is inspirational!! You are a holy bas Yisrael! Do you live near a large Jewish community? You could ask your local Chabad Rabbi if there are other orthodox shuls in the area that you could visit. Also, sometimes organizations including Oorah and Aish need a bit of pushing to let them know you’re serious. Don’t give up! Keep sending them emails, and don’t be scared to call up Aish Rabbis if you get their number. They’re always more than happy to help. Good luck, and keep on truckin! 🙂

    in reply to: Ze nehene v'ze lo chaser – ins and outs #1091438
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Aprager – thank you very much! Very interesting. One case I had in mind is using someone else’s login for an online service without permission – obviously assuming that you are not costing them anything. I’m curious where that would fall into halacha. I’m not subscribed to the Yated, but I’ll keep an eye out for a copy.

    in reply to: Ze nehene v'ze lo chaser – ins and outs #1091436
    Curiosity
    Participant

    pcoz – I appreciate the response, but that’s really not where I wanted to go with this. You can do a CR search and find half a dozen other threads on CD pirating. I’d rather not pin it to a single anecdotal example.

    My question is more to get into Jewish ethics. Is it moral to do an action that involves misusing someone else’s property without any detriment to them but that benefits yourself and gives you an “unfair” advantage over others?

    Common, where are the coffee sipping talmidei chachomim?!

    in reply to: We must WAKE UP! #1090793
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Shloimydr, Amen.

    Rabbi Gavriel Sassoon gave a powerful speech on 17 tammuz in which he stressed that we must submit ourselves to the ratzon Hashem. YWN had pinned a link to it in the main page. I highly recommend listening to it. It will send a chill up your spine if you listen.

    in reply to: Just because it's ???? doesn't mean it's right #1090810
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Catch yourself, I think that slavery would be disdained by gedolim because 1) dina d’malchusa dina, and 2) the global community today would use it as an excuse to persecute the Jews. Slavery in the Torah should not be compared with the American definition of slavery. It’s a totally different thing.

    in reply to: Middle Names #1091047
    Curiosity
    Participant

    The need to be distinguished during population growth svara makes sense for why middle names were introduced, but as a gabbi, I was always perplexed by those people who have four names and whose father has three. Too many names bro!

    in reply to: We must WAKE UP! #1090774
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Sam2, according to Chazal the last straw for the dor hamabul was the same legalization and shtar writing for forbidden relationships that we are seeing now. This is only the second time in history that this is happening en masse. The first time, God destroyed the world.

    Chazal also say that at the end of days “pnei hador kipnei hakelev.” Last week one of the leading presidential candidates was ripping on Democratic leaders for “leading from behind” and swaying with the wind of public opinion, which is the pashut interpretation of this chazal, who lived in a time of monarchs and tyrannical rule, where one could get hanged, or worse, for dissenting against their rulers.

    in reply to: We must WAKE UP! #1090770
    Curiosity
    Participant

    edited since we are not allowing a repeat of some recent threads

    Be happy. Do Mitsvos.

    At least we agree on two things.

    P.S. You seem to believe that learning Torah is done by Yidden because HaShem ordered to, even though we hate it. We like learning.It’s fun. Why do you think people look for heterim to learn during the times it is prohibited, or debate whether one can learn in shul during davening. Try it some time.

    Don’t know what this has to do with my comment.

    in reply to: What's the deal with Donald Trump? #1090389
    Curiosity
    Participant

    I’m not convinced Trump is a good choice for America, but his statement on immigration is spot on. “Sending over” is just a figure of speech. I am sure he doesn’t actually believe that the Mexican government is conspiring to exile all criminals to the US, and I don’t think anyone suspects that he believes that. If you want to discredit him, I would worry more about conflict of interest in saying that Trump Inc. can, in the future, rebuild American infrastructure better than anyone else.

    in reply to: Are You Pondering What I'm Pondering? #1089737
    Curiosity
    Participant

    I can’t wait to take over the world… sigh…

    in reply to: Parah Aduma is invalid :( #1089748
    Curiosity
    Participant

    I’m still not sure what all the hype was about. Look up “highland cattle” for thousands of red heifers. The supposed parah adumah near Lakewood didn’t look any different than regular highland cattle specimens; though it is mixed with another breed – Angus, if I recall.

    in reply to: Non religious argument against same sex marriage #1089826
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Those who fail to grasp the concept of “Lo Plug” are claiming that the Federal Government should cease to support marriage for those who cannot conceive or who plan on not having children. This would mean that they would also stop granting benefits to married couples once they reach an age at which they can no longer conceive, which would require that the government mandate physical checkups on all married individuals. First of all, just because a couple cannot conceive or chooses not to does not mean that they cannot provide a healthy household for children. Second, it is unconstitutional for the government to breach your privacy by inquiring on these matters. It is not the government’s business how your family planning or reproductive organs work.

    At the end of the day, even an infertile heterosexual married couple can still adopt or foster a child and, in general, provide a physically and psychologically healthy and stable environment, which is greatly beneficial to society. Homosexual couples have shown to be far less capable of doing so. This is a fact, despite several dissenting research studies, the large majority of which have been shown to stray from accepted scientific method, have gaping holes in methodology, or have fabricated data. Please, do a little more studying than Page 1 of a Google search. Therefore, it makes absolutely no sense to redefine marriage for the sake of extending government benefits to couples which are, as a whole, destructive to society.

    in reply to: Non religious argument against same sex marriage #1089819
    Curiosity
    Participant

    It is worthwhile to add that, in terms of building a stable household to produce a physically and mentally healthy future generation of citizens, homosexual couples are, statistically, way off the charts in terms of domestic violence – particularly female couples.

    in reply to: Non religious argument against same sex marriage #1089812
    Curiosity
    Participant

    To Matan1 – Actually the American College for Pediatricians had THIS to say regarding the ruling:

    As for the OP’s point, as others have alluded to, there are 2 reasons for Government to intervene in the matter of marriage – ANY marriage – by regulating certification and granting married citizens benefits that unmarried citizens cannot get:

    1) To promote marriage because the government seeks to uphold a traditional religious/moral value system.

    2) To promote marriage because the government seeks to increase the financial, health, and social welfare of its population – believing that increasing the population and cultivating an environment where the next generation can be raised under stable, monogamous parents.

    At the end of the day, same-gender “marriage” does neither. It definitely does not adhere to any religious or traditional value system, nor does it contribute in the second way. These couples as a fact, are unable to increase the population, they have shown to alarmingly proliferate the spread of AIDS, HIV, and other STDs, they have been shown, as a generalization, to not be capable of establishing a stable, monogamous, healthy environment for any children which they may foster from others. See quote above as well as many, many other studies. It simply is not rational for any government to encourage this behavior, even from a strictly Utilitarian point of view.

    As for “equality” and “discrimination”: Everyone in the USA is equally entitled to marry one person (at a time) of the opposite gender, without discrimination against religion, race, physical handicap, or personal belief. Everyone should be equally forbidden to marry one person of the same gender, of unlawful age, of incestuous relationship, or of non-human species. Period.

    in reply to: Fear of bugs is not a phobia unless it is irrational. #1091140
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Oomis, “Hashem has a purpose for ALL of His creatures.”

    YES, apparently the sole purpose of roaches is to gross us out beyond words! Yuck!

    in reply to: DHS funding, amnesty, executive action, and immigration #1062711
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Thanks for the response. So what can the Republicans do that people are saying they aren’t?

    in reply to: Googling Your Date #1075063
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Back in my dating days I once Googled the names of potential future in-laws, and it turned up a record with a substantial and disturbing criminal history. The person was presently incarcerated. After asking the shadchan, my suspicions were confirmed that this was indeed the parent of the girl in question. I had mixed feelings about it because the girl herself was not at fault, but I wasn’t particularly interested in the shidduch to begin with, and the backdrop of having such an in-law was just too much for me to handle, so I said ‘no’. I felt really bad for the girl, but you shouldn’t get married for pity. Googling has proved very useful in avoiding such situations. I think it’s a responsible and prudent thing to do, and not at all unreasonable.

    That being said, one should be careful to make sure to validate that the results they pull up indeed belong to the person they are looking into. I know that when Googling my uncommon name it pulls up some guy’s Facebook with photos of all his drinking, smoking, and clubbing activities… it’s not me.

    in reply to: r meir kahane #1049235
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Take this with a grain of salt because it’s been a few years, but I recall hearing from a close talmid of the Rosh Yeshiva ZTZ”L of Yeshivas Rabbeinu Yisrael Meir Hakohen (AKA Yeshivas Chofetz Chaim) in the Rosh Yeshiva’s name that R’ Kahane’s philosophy was basically correct, but his methods were not. In other words, his ideas about expelling the Arabs and the risks that foreigners in the land posed were ideal and true, but the methods he pushed were not practical. I don’t want to say more in someone else’s name if I don’t remember the details. R’ Kahane was definitely one of the good guys.

    in reply to: Chanuka Lights #1048008
    Curiosity
    Participant

    Beautiful. Yasher kochacha!

    in reply to: Not all feminists are the same. #1049217
    Curiosity
    Participant

    PBA,

    Your post really made me think about my position and realize that I agree with you 100%, and that made me think even more, and then I realized how much that speaks about feminists’ failure to promote real feminism.

    They’ve taken a philosophy that is essentially, at its root, an acceptable and good cause, and stigmatized it as something that is offensive, crude, obnoxious, outrageous, and discriminatory against men. Ironic, is it not, that we now define feminism as all which is abnormal?

    Curiosity
    Participant

    Don’t clap when there is a pause between movements, or else you’ll be seen as an ignoramus. Wait until they put down their instruments and the conductor turns to face you.

    in reply to: Scientists Debunked #1042355
    Curiosity
    Participant

    HaLeiVi, black velvet is not the exception. Everything known to man, except a black hole, has some reflectiveness. The closest thing we have to an out right blackbody with zero emmisivity is Vantablack, which is made of vertically arrayed carbon nanotubes, but it still reflects 0.035% or so of light.

Viewing 50 posts - 101 through 150 (of 910 total)