shuali

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  • in reply to: A rebbe iz Atzmus uMahus vos hot zich areingeshtelt in a guf #1823684
    shuali
    Participant

    @The Fake Maven –
    “Therefore all your points would seem irrelevant, since all you are proving is just that it is ‘part’ not the ‘full’ thing; but you admit to it being ‘part’ of אלוקות ממש, (unlike your original objection).”
    Clearly you misunderstood my original objections.

    “As to the Avos, see the Shefa Tal there where he draws a parallel between every Jew. But furthermore we are talking about Tzaddikim.”
    Dovid HaMelech teaches, ועמך כולם צדיקים. Toras CHaBa”D aside, there are, according to this posuk and to all hashgafos (CHaGa”S, etc.) there are far more than one tzadik in every generation, community, beis medrash o shul / Beis Medrash.

    in reply to: A rebbe iz Atzmus uMahus vos hot zich areingeshtelt in a guf #1823368
    shuali
    Participant

    @The Fake Maven:
    First of all, your original quote left out the word ממעל.

    Secondly, the operative word here is חלק and the prefix מ of ממעל.

    Similarly the words חלק מן האור abd the word שנתחלק (Sefer HaTal quoted above) does not infer or imply עצמות ומהות as is being suggested the Rebbe said.

    Thirdly, arguably the אבות הקדושים – the מרכבה לשכינה – cannot be compared to anyone who followed them.

    in reply to: A rebbe iz Atzmus uMahus vos hot zich areingeshtelt in a guf #1823331
    shuali
    Participant

    @The Fake Maven – I am quite certain the language is חלקא-לוק ממעל not ממש.

    shuali
    Participant

    @5ish – The source from which you quote clearly says that the Tiferes Adam recommends not using even scissors for (1) Kabbolistic reasons, and (2) because shaving with a razor has become so prevalent. NOT because he held it was assur min ha’Torah or even midRabbonon.

    shuali
    Participant

    @RebbetzinGoldenpickanicerscreenname – Excellent posts. Good points. Great observations. Wonderful and clear presentation. Thank you.

    shuali
    Participant

    @5ish – You yourself quote from Rav Chaim, in the name ofbthe Chofetz Chaim (Likutei Halachos), that he refers to the machines of his day (not to scissors).

    shuali
    Participant

    I believe if you will look in Likutei Halachos to Makos, third perek, you will find the information as I presented it. I am unfamiliar with Tiferes Adam and likewise unfamiliar with the focus of the sefer or the nuances and context of language used.

    shuali
    Participant

    Regarding Aharon HaKohein: Trimmed, yes. Cut/Shave/Remove/Destroy, no.

    The issue here seems to be that a number of well meaning, sincere posters believe it is possible there is Gemora or medrash that they know, or know better, than Rav Chaim.

    shuali
    Participant

    As with any discussion, and especially one pertaining to halachah, clear definition of terms is required. This discussion adds the need for accurate and consistent translation of terms as well.
    There is NO issur giluach on ones head. Peyos (edges/corners of ones head) may not be rounded even with a machine/trimmer which cuts in the manner of a scissors.

    There IS an issur giluach on ones face (this week’s sedra, I believe). The Gemora learns out that this prohibition is only when done derech hashchasah (not a scissors).

    The issue of shavers has always been (the Chofetz Chaim discusses this in his Likutei HALACHOS on Maseches Makos) are these machines acting as scissors or as razors.

    How and when the definition of “beged ishah” changes requires a posek.

    Inyonei kabbolah and midos chasidus cannot be ignored or dismissed as we learned last week Kedoshim Tihiyu is a mitzvah min haTorah.

    Rav Chaim, as I posted earlier, does NOT prohibit shaving. He does paskin, I believe, that at least some of our “shavers” are razors al pi halachah and therefore prohibited min haTorah. He may also be saying we should be makpid on how we “dress (i.e. like traditional Jews who always had beards). He is certainly entitled to that opinion, and I would value it as it is certainly coming from having learned a few more blatt Gemora and from chazering Shulchan Aruch a few more times than we have.

    No, he is NOT paskenning for the entire world, but we CAN’T either. Even for ourselves, it is advisable to ask for oneself.

    shuali
    Participant

    Rav Chaim shlit”a cannot prohibit ANYTHING! He CAN pasken that something is a Torah prohibition or a Rabbinical one.

    The Torah clearly prohibits shaving ones beard. The question is only if any particular device used to remove ones facial hair meets the criteria of that prohibition or not.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1724574
    shuali
    Participant

    @Joseph – According to the Gemora, the Rishonim, and Achronim, the corners/edges of the head end where two of the corners/edges of the beard begin (i.e. where the skull and upper jaw meet the lower jaw know as the lechi ha’elyon and lechi ha’tachton respectively. The Kaf HaChaim quotes a Zohar that the peyos should be moved away from the ear during tefilos. I heard that Rav Chaim said this is not found in our Zohar.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1724263
    shuali
    Participant

    @Neville Chaim Berlin – In communities where I have lived – both in town and out of town – I have seen, quite often, parents LEAVING their sons’ peyos after their upsherin (for example) and the son, then, leaving them “for life”. Sometimes the fathers eventually themselves add peyos, sometimes not. On rare occasions I have seen High School bochrim take them off (more out of peer pressure, I suspect). But usually they stay.

    There is possibly a big difference between this scenario and one where the boy decides on his own to grow his peyos. Then, since it was not part of his chinuch (meaning his parents didn’t give them to him, or at least encourage it or praise the change), they are more likely to come off.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1724122
    shuali
    Participant

    I have not had the chance to carefully go through the four volumes of Meir Einei Yisroel which I own for the family record mentioned above, but I did notice the following. On the Chofetz Chaim’s letterhead on the lashon ha’kodesh side, it is printed ישראל מאיר הכהן, while on the “English” side it says Yisroel Meir Kagen. Clearly Kagen is not his last name as, if it were, he would have had the other side say either כהן or הכהן כהן. Kagen is merely a translation of הכהן (again with the “g” being the closest thing to a Russian “h”. I will continue to look for the document, nonetheless.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1724027
    shuali
    Participant

    It is very well known, by the way, that the original minhag among CHaBa”D chasidim was to have longer, noticeable peyos. That changed when the Rebbe RaYa”TZ came to America. Both the Rebbe RaYa”TZ and the previous Rebbe, zichronom li’vrochah, had very long peyos kept under their yarmulka. None the less the minhag here, or perhaps in general outside of Tomchei Temimim, was not to have.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1724019
    shuali
    Participant

    @Neville Chaim Berlin – “I think the OP was talking about the families you see walking around where the father has no peyes yet the children do. It’s pretty common and perplexing.”

    Not completely perplexing. Keep in mind the following. In the late 40’s and continuing through the 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s parents often not only did not leave (longer, behind the ears) peyos on their sons, but often did not allow them outside to play or walk around the street with a Yarmulke, choosing a baseball cap or similar hat. As our communities grew in size and neighborhoods began developing, old customs returned with more comfort and ease. A case in point. . .
    A very chashuveh talmid chocham, now a R”M in a major Brooklyn Yeshiva, who did not have “litvisheh” peyos at the time, put them on his three sons. When asked about this, he answered, that he simply left his son’s peyos, or better put did not remove them. That is a passive act. To remove them would have required he take a positive action (i.e. cutting them off). To grow them on himself is a conscious decision and requires an action, so to speak.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1724023
    shuali
    Participant

    Regarding the קאפאטע mentioned in the Mishnah Berurah, my point was that he writes over there that it has become common to wear this garment and therefore he discusses the solution to the issue of tzitzis.

    But either way, it is clear from the aforementioned teshuvah of the Nodeh b’Yehudah that the way of all Yidden was “to go long.” There are a few reasons for this. And as mentioned above this changed for practical reasons (getting bnei Yeshivah married).

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723827
    shuali
    Participant

    @Phil – Sure. I will look for it, bli neder, and post.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723723
    shuali
    Participant

    @Neville Chaim Berlin –
    Firstly: Actually you wrote, “The Mishnah Berura is meikel (in how he poskens) on just about every single halachah you mentioned.” Sorry, I had no idea that you were only referring to tevilas Ezra.

    Secondly you write, “We posken by sifrei halachah, not by “gedolim biographies” and pictures.” The OP was about hanhagah not halachah. Therefore the rule of “shimusho gedolah mei’limudah certainly applies here as do any and all historical records.

    Thirdly, the Mishnah Berurah indeed wore a long coat (actually discusses the קאפאטע in hilchos tzitzis describing it as a beged which has gained much popularity, had longer, noticeable peyos, wore a gartle (at least on Friday nights (the family still has the gartle), and never missed tevilas Ezra.

    All this points to the fact that peyos are not new, and are not only Chasidish. That was the jist of the original thread.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723617
    shuali
    Participant

    @laskern – I don’t believe anyone is disputing that here (although which bone and if with mouth open or closed is a dispute amongst the poskim). What was being discussed is if the “style” of the modern day Yeshivah bochur is indeed a style or an old minhag to have longer more noticeable peyos for either one of the reasons mentioned above. Also being discussed was the reason for the old minhag, even among Uekesheh Yidden, for being lost.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723614
    shuali
    Participant

    @Phil – Except that the family record, in the Chofetz Chaim’s handwriting, published in one of the early volumes of the Hebrew Meir Einei Yisroel, uses repeatedly the name Poupko. Also a cousin (I believe) a Rav in Flatbush for many years, likewise had that name.

    Kagen, on the other hand, is the Russian spelling of Kohen/Cohen (such as Horodna/Gorodna and Horowitz/Gorwitz).

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723585
    shuali
    Participant

    @Neville Chaim Berlin – Very interesting. Could you please post where in the Mishnah Berurah (which is exclusively on Orach Chaim) where he paskins on the issues of peyos or long coats?

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723533
    shuali
    Participant

    @haskafah – A great discussion indeed. Thank you for ypur participation and contributions. I don’t think there is any machlokes as to what defines halachik peyos (see the Mishnah and Gemora in the third perek in Makos, theRambam, Shulchan Aruch, etc.). Two reasons have been brought in a number of sources for the basis for longer peyos. One is found in either the Sefer HaChinuch or the Minchas Chinuch; to make it clear we do not do as the non-Jewish world (e.g. monks) who round their corners and we therefore specifically grow them longer. Another reason, brought inbthe the sefer Maamar Mordechai, I believe, is Zeh Keili v’anveihu.

    On the subject of short jackets which you mention, the famous teshuvah from the Noda BiYehuda says that the first Yid to go short was “following the chukos akum, but ince he did, there us no Torah issue of not going long. But, once again, that IS the way all Yidden went until, for various reasons, a change was made. But once again we see a RE newal and a REturn to the original order.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723213
    shuali
    Participant

    @haskafah – Again, the minhag (original and very wide spread minhag) in Lita (actually almost throughout Europe) was to gave peyos (either behind or in front of the ears). This is clear from pictures and paintings of Gedolim such as Rav Eliyahu Kramer (The Vilna Gaon) , Rav Naftali Tzvi Yehuda Berlin (The NeTZi”V), Rav Shimshon (ben) Refoel Hirsch, Rav Moshe, Rav Yaakov, Rav Aharon, the Soloveitchik family, Rav Kook, Rav Shach, and many more. They also had beards and wore long costs. The mingag changed when shiduchim – and therefore the continuity of Klal Yisroel – were threatened. Ergo, your father’s kabbolah from the Slabodka talmid is accurate albeit limitedly so, as it was not always the case. The old minhag has had a rebirth of sorts, but it is not new. That is indisputable.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723220
    shuali
    Participant

    @haskafah – Regarding mikveh: you are again suffering from what be best described as myopic orthodoxy. Rav Yisroel Meir HaKohein Poupko (better known as the Chofetz Chaim or the Mishnah Berurah, no chasidic Rebbe – never missed tevilas Ezra. Rav Elya Lopian, also no Rebbe, discussed feeling the entry of his neshamah yiseirah when he would go to the mikveh on Erev Shabbos. The Vilna Gaon, quoted in the Maaseh Rav, says regarding tevilas Ezra, that it is better to go on Motza’ai Shabbos than on Shabbos so as to avoid issues of sichitah, but go he did. He also wore a gartle. His Talmid, Rav Chaim Volishiner, wished to put on tefillin of Rabbeinu Tam as mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch (as do many Litvisheh Roshei Yeshiva (Rav Aharon, his son Rav Schneur, Rav Hutner, Rav Yaakov, Rav Moshe). This was not due to the influence of the chasidim, I assure you. If anything is true, movement AWAY from peyos, long coats, gartlich, beards, R”T tefillin, etc. was to distance themselves from them. That coupled with the older version of the shidduch crises prompted movement away from these things. This has all, B”H, changed and minhagim and tzuras haYihudi has returned to its former glory.
    I am NOT arguing with your description of the pre and post WWII Litvisheh standard, only with your understanding of what the original minhag was.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723135
    shuali
    Participant

    @David Y – See the Sefer HaChinuch and Minchas Chinuch on this subject. While you are correct that there is a minimum requirement, the source for growing the peyos “into the beard” (i.e. long enough to reach the pe’as ha zakein) is found in more ancient texts. Reb Avrohom ben HaRambam discusses the Teimonie “simonim” with his father. The AriZal discusses longer peyos. And as mentioned before, many “Litvish Roshei Yeshivah and poskim had such peyos. Some I did not mention; Rav Shach and Rav Elyashiv.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1723131
    shuali
    Participant

    @haskafah – Both Rav Hutner and Rav Moshe had peyos behind their ears (more or less). Rav Hutner put on peyos after his arrival in the United States, while Rav Moshe always had.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1722983
    shuali
    Participant

    @haskafah – With all due respect, you should perhaps look at the list I presented. I did not mention any from the era or yeshivos you mention and claim they had peyos. Although I could mention Rav Isser Zalman Meltzer, Rav A. Y. HaKohein Kook, Rav M. M. Epstein, and Rav Aharon Cohen (the former two being from Slabodka/Chevron).

    I am certain that you are aware that the heads of many (non-chasidish) Yeshivos made a decision in the years between the two world wars to bring the dress code of their bochrim more in line with the aristocracy of the times. This was simply because more and more women (prior to the acceptance and success of Sarah Schnirer) had little interest in marrying benei Yeshivah. Ergo, the three-piece grey suits, the fancy fedoras, pocket watches, pinc-nez (sp.?) glasses, and no beards and close-to-the-skin peyos.

    My point is only that this “style” is better described as REnewed rather than simply new.

    All this is a matter of historical record. The fact the Mir, Telz, and Slobodka adopted a hora’ah sha’ah style, does not in the slightest cause the pictoral history mentioned in my original post to disappear.

    in reply to: Payos behind the ears? Why? #1722929
    shuali
    Participant

    It is not new. It is not thirty years old. In Europe it was very common among the Ashkenazim to have peyos both behind and in front of ones ears. The Vilna Gaon, the Netziv, the Chazon Ish, Rav Shimshon (ben) Refoel Hirsch, Rav Moshe, Rav Yaakov, Rav Aharon Kotler all had noticeable payos. Rav Chaim Brisker, the Brisker Rav, Rav Chaim Kanievsky and his father the Steipler all have/had peyos. Rav Beinish Finkle and Rav Noson Tzvi both had Peyos

    Unfortunately, some of these minhagim were lost as Yidden crossed the Atlantic before, during, and after the war. B”H they are being returned to there original place.

    in reply to: Always Wearing a Hat When Outdoors #1710754
    shuali
    Participant

    Those among us who are 55 and older, probably remember that every clothing store had a men’s and women’s hat department. Frum or not, Jewish or not, there was a sense of honor and modesty that existed. Jackets and ties were always worn on plane trips. Many restaurants would not seat you without them.
    Unfortunately we have lost a large percentage of that sense of kovod.
    The Mishnah Berurah brings that the berachah of oteir Yisroel b’sifara is going on the hats we wear.

    in reply to: Why do Yeshiva not pay their Rabbes and Teachers on time? #1687473
    shuali
    Participant

    1) First of all this is, for the most part – for the vast majority of the Yeshivos, Beis Yaakovs, Chedarim, and Day Schools throughout the United States – a thing of the past.
    2) Approximately 25 percent of New York City families pay full tuition. About half of those have done so by January – February. That, understandably, places a burden on the administrators in first half of any school year.
    3) Average annual cost per class is minimum $200, 000,likely closer to $300,000 when you include each salary, maintenance, utilities, food, etc.
    Therefore, I think we have much to be thankful for; supportive askanim, sacrificing parents, and hardworking administrations and staff.

    shuali
    Participant

    @modernmisnaged – “This question has bothered me for YEARS, which is why I have scoured Tanach, Shas, Rambam, Tur, Beis Yosef, Rema, G’ra, Chaye Adam, Aruch Hashulchan, Mishna Berurah, and Igros Moshe, and I have come up with NOTHING!”
    Of course not. Did you find “don’t double park,” or “thou shall not cross against the light?” Did you find Hachnosas Orchim or bikur cholim (anywhere but a breisa and in Sefer Ahavas Chesed? Vatranus (except in the mussar seforim)? To be an anav?
    1) No mitzvos found explicitly in the Torah or the seforim of the monei ha’mitzvos, count midos as Torah obligations. Rav Chaim Vital explained why.
    2) Productivity and profits for IBM plummeted after they dropped their white shirt, dark suit, striped tie dress code.
    3) An experiment in NY schools requiring uniforms saw grades and good conduct increase.
    4) The uniform of the Jew has always been different than that of the non-Jewish society in which they lived. Sometimes by choice, sometimes by decree (e.g. the yellow star, “crown” of fox tails, etc.). I prefer the former.
    5) In this day and age where we have been exposed to and influenced by the be an individual, a non-conformist, anything which smells like forced compliance is avi avos ha’tumah. Unfortunately for those individuals, the fact is the true strength of the individual is directly related to his /her connection to a group.

    shuali
    Participant

    @amosak- “If Jews are supposed to dress differently than non- Jews, why do chasidim dress in the same clothes as 19th century Russian nobles,”
    This is a matter of historical record. A government decree required Yidden all adopt a non-Jewish mode of dress. There was a disagreement between the poskei ha’dor if this was an issue of chukas akum or of gizeiras shmad making the din yeihareig v’al ya’avor or not. By adopting an old style they were not oiver and yet fulfilled the decree.

    in reply to: HELP – How Do I Stop Getting The Piece Of Trash Lehovin Newspaper? #1654165
    shuali
    Participant

    @mentch1 – I’m sorry you misunderstood my intention, and even more sorry if my presentation added to that misunderstanding. I only meant to say that in spite of the Rebbe’s beautifully worded words, the point he made, that it is only a mi’ut of individuals who align themselves with Rav Shmuel ztzvk”l and that these few did so in a very not ba’kavodikeh way and that there is no “chilukei dei’os” in America as far as this goes, there are indeed many, not a few, and they are themselves Gedolei Olam, who disagree with Rav Chaim (Rav Gershon, and lbcl”c) with Rav Aaron Leib ztzvk”l. And they do so with great trepidation.

    in reply to: HELP – How Do I Stop Getting The Piece Of Trash Lehovin Newspaper? #1653126
    shuali
    Participant

    “Hashem created chaim berlin for one reason: That whatever the chaim berlin cult does, everyone else should do exactly the opposite and you will be fine.”
    In spite of what The Novominsker Rebbe Shlit”a said on Motza’ai Shabbos at this year’s Agudah Convention, of those who sit on the Moetzes, Rav Aharon Schechter, Rav Malkiel Kotler, Rav Yosef Harari-Raful, Rav Yaakov Horowitz (Telz), Rav Frankel (Vialipole), and others, all believe the mesorah is most accurately represented by Rav Shmuel Auerbach ztzvk”l.
    And number two, what is the difference between the brazen lack of kovod ha’Torah, emunas chachomim, and ahavas Yisroel that some of the above posts echo, and that of OO, YCT, MO and some other unaffiliated Jews?

    in reply to: On What Siddur is the Artscroll Based? #1619887
    shuali
    Participant

    While, I believe, the Roedelheim siddur formed the nusach ha’tefilah as far as dikduk is concerned, Nusach Ashkenaz is largely built, I think, on the nusach of Rav Shabsi Sofer and Rav Hirsh Shatz. Even further back, it is based on the nusach of one of the Geonim. Some source indicate that Nusach Ashkenaz has its roots in what they call Nusach Bavli versus Nusach Yerushalmi. It is interesting to note that many of the changes we make on Shabbos (hashkiveinu and in the berachah achas me’ein sheva) on Yom Tov in avodah in chazaras ha’shatz (she’oscha livadcha) is based on the Nusach Yerushalmi.

    in reply to: Calling 311 on someone blocking your driveway is mesira #1616413
    shuali
    Participant

    First of all thank you for raising the question. This has come up a few times (“just running in for minchah (or for ‘krias ha’ Megillah’ or for a bottle of milk, a cream cheese sandwich, or a cup of coffee)”). Thank you also for requesting clear sources and no personal opinions.
    I don’t know if the following is a good comparison, but want to out it out there. A frum traffic officer, whom I know personally, asked Rav Dovid Feinstein if it was permissible to write a parking ticket for someone you know is a Yid? He was told absolutely. I am quite sure he was told explicitly it was not considered mesirah. Perhaps calling the cops down is different than if the officer is there already. Perhaps, on the other hand, the mesira is the ticket.
    Be that as it may, the question is an important one. If someone has clearer sources, please post as it is very relevant in Brooklyn.

    in reply to: Is the Yeshiva Community Wrong? #1615453
    shuali
    Participant

    The majority of our avodah is in the realm of divrei ha’reshus; in areas not explicitly stated in the Torah, Mishnah, Gemora, Rishonim, Achronim, Poskim, etc. The vast majority of iur challenges are exactly that, OUR challenges. The Mesillas Yisharim explains that much like the individual who finds himself in a maze can best reach the goal by seeking the advice of those who have the vantage point of one who has already to reached the point to where you are trying to reach. For this, it is a must to seek daas Torah. True, his answers may not be found in the Torah. True, his answers may, therefore, appear as just his opinion. In reality, however, they come from the perspective of one who has seen much, accomplished much, conquered much. May you have much hatzlachah!

    in reply to: Shabbos Keeper fridge device #1606246
    shuali
    Participant

    The Shabbos Keeper, as far as I know, is only for certain GE brands. The Zman product for other problematic refrigerators appears to be out of stock (according to their website).

    in reply to: Zebra Tallis #1597622
    shuali
    Participant

    1) The Mishnah Berurah brings that the stripes are zeicher to the techeilis. I believe he says they are blue.
    2) Many of the real Turkish talleisim worn by Belzer Chasidim (and perhaps others) have bluish stripes.
    3) There is no reason to differentiate between a talis gadol and a talis koton as far as stripes goes.
    4) Indeed the RaMBa”M is the source for the halachah that the beged must be the same color as the tzitzis (not the other way around as stated in one post).
    5) It is oft repeated that the Israeli flag was designed as a “substitute” for the talis (i.e. We don’t need a talis, or any mitzvos, anymore since we have our own country.

    in reply to: Which famous people have you met? #1592067
    shuali
    Participant

    Critical to know the difference between “famous” and “important.”
    G’mar chasimah Tovah to all.

    in reply to: Yarmulke origins #1591105
    shuali
    Participant

    @MDG
    “About the word yarmulke, from etymonline.com
    yarmulke (n.) 1903, from Yiddish yarmulke, from Polish jarmułka, originally “a skullcap worn by priests,” perhaps ultimately from Medieval Latin almutia “cowl, hood.”

    Two points:
    (1) It is well known and widely accepted (see “The Word” and “Safah Achas”) that the etymology of many words as found in the more scholarly dictionaries are not only incorrect, but, at times, purposefully misleading.
    (2) Upon hearing an Iranian Jew refer to a yarmulka, I asked him if that is how it was referred to in Iran from where he immigrated as an adult (married with school-age children). He answered of course. So it is unlikely the word is of Polish origins. It is far more likely the Polish word has its origins in the Yiddish-adopted, Lashon HaKodesh based word.

    in reply to: Yarmulke origins #1591107
    shuali
    Participant

    “I was just wondering, where does the minhag of wearing a yarmulke come from and when did it start?”

    I believe that, for whatever reason, this is now a codified halachah and longer a minhag (if it ever was simply that).
    The Gemora discusses that children sometimes went with uncovered heads and sometimes with covered heads. Adults, the implication is, always covered their heads.
    Having spoken with Sefardisheh Rabbonim and immigrants from the Middle East (Iran in particular) they, too, always covered their heads except when their lives were being threatened.

    in reply to: Bug Checking #1553466
    shuali
    Participant

    1) “The law goes according to the lenient opinion since it is a doubt of Rabbinical status (safek d’Rabbanan), . . . ”
    If the known infestation levels of a particular food is greater than 50%, the food is considered muchzak b’tola’im and there is a chiyuv min ha’Torah to check. Such a case is NOT a Rabbinic prohibition but rather one of the Torah.

    2) ” . . . for a person is not interested in eating the insect, but is compelled to eat it along with the food, against his will. .
    . . ”
    Since the particular food can generally easily be cleaned, removing all infestation, it is difficult to hear that anyone is forcing him to eat the bugs.

    3) ” . . . Moreover, according to the majority of poskim, a tiny insect is batel b’shishim (nullified in sixty; that is, permissible so long as forbidden ingredients constitute no more than 1/60 of the whole) from the Torah, and it was only the Chachamim (Sages) who were stringent in declaring that a ‘briyah’ (a whole insect) is not batel (nullified) even in a thousand. . . ”
    Something which ‘Only the Chachomim prohibited’ is nonetheless prohibited. And even the Kreisi who entertains the possibility that a berya is botul, is of the opinion it is so b’elef (1/1000, not 1/60) as suggested.

    4) ” . . . Some poskim say that the Chachamim were stringent only in regards to an insect that has some importance, but if it is tiny and disgusting, even from rabbinical status, it is batel b’shishim. In addition, it’s also doubtful whether in actuality a tiny insect exists.”
    What are the tiny insects “if they don’t even exist? An insect – for example a mite, which the nosei keilim on the Shulchan Aruch refer to as millbin or mill worms, is very visible and easily detected when they move, so there is little reason not to assur.

    5) ” . . . Where can I find some sources to look through on this topic. It is quite surprising as most or all kashrus organizations make it seem as a Torah issur too eat vegetables that have not been checked for bugs.”
    As explained above, any food with known or presumed infestation levels of above 50% is considered muchzak and they may not be eaten prior to checking. This obligation is a Torah obligation. From 10% to 50% (others say from as little as 5%) the obligation is to check remains, albeit of Rabbinical origin. Only levels below 10% (or 5%) are free from any obligation to check.

    in reply to: Yeshiva of Waterbury #1553360
    shuali
    Participant

    May I humbly suggest you ask your son’s Rebbeim and Menahalim and your Rav, Rebbe, Posek, or Rosh Yeshivah? These are the individuals who know your son and your family best (certainly better than your “friends” in the coffee room). On a personal note, however, I can say that the relationships built there are very strong, meaningful, and productive.

    in reply to: Proposal spectacles #1477742
    shuali
    Participant

    @RebYidd23 – “There is a long standing minhag of doing shtick at weddings to be misameach the choson and kallah.”
    I may be wrong, but I believe the primary mitzvah of being misameach the choson and kallah is by expressing to one how special the other one is (i.e. Kallah na’eh va’chasudah). Believe it or not, keitzad mirakdim was not instituted by CHaZa”L to give friends of the choson the opportunity to show off their talents or to give costume stores sone business. It was for family members, tzadikim, Roshei Yeshibah, Rabbonim, etc. the opportunity to heap praises on the kallah. There are those (Rishonim perhaps) who hold this is the ikar mitzvah to be misameach the choson and kallah.

    in reply to: Population of frum Yidden: Prewar versus Now #1461764
    shuali
    Participant

    Joseph is 100% correct. And while it is also true that far fewer people had advanced Torah knowledge than today where most everyone completes Mesivta and many spend several years in Beis Medrash and typically a couple of years in kollel, in kollel, the vast majority of Yidden, perhaps as many as you 80%, were frum and tremendous maaminim. To wuote Rav Yaakov ztzvk”l, emuna was taught to children while still in their carriages (i.e. they saw and heard living emuna.

    in reply to: Museum of the Bible #1441430
    shuali
    Participant

    Some of us may remember Ginn books; one of the early publishers of pre-school and elementary school primers and readers. Well. . .
    To expand their readership (i.e. customer base) and therefore their profit margins, they offered to customize their books for various groups. The story line remained the same, but priest could be changed to minister, pastor, or rabbi. Church could be changed to temple, sanctuary, or synagogue. Names could be changed from Dick and Jane to Paul and Mary, or even Pinchas and Miriam. And so on.
    When they approached the Satmar community, the latter turned down their generous offer. They explained there is nothing about a brother and his sister and their pet dog playing ball together in the park on Sunday morning which can be translated/transformed into a Jewish book.
    Nothing about, even the new testament, as displayed/depicted in the Bible Museum, could possibly express Ratzon HaShem or any of the depth of our TaNa”CH. Nothing!

    in reply to: Why are the lakewood rabbanim so against an eruv in thier Town?? #1428224
    shuali
    Participant

    I know this may sound silly. I also realize the suggestion is probably a big waste of time, but has anyone thought to ask “the Lakewood Rabbonim”?

    in reply to: ACHDUS! Chabad And Judaism Are One! Let’s Bring Moshiach Together #1413233
    shuali
    Participant

    @Beratzki Poretz – When Rav Landau ztzvk”l of Benei Brak wanted to build a mikveh there according to the shitah of CHaBa”D, the Chazon Ish told him, “Benei Brak never had such a mikveh and it doesn’t need one now. I’ve been told that as long as Rav Landau was living that mikveh was never built.

    in reply to: ACHDUS! Chabad And Judaism Are One! Let’s Bring Moshiach Together #1412989
    shuali
    Participant

    “Aish Hatorah and Ohr Sameach, Uri Zohar…all worthless and haven’t done anything.”
    Huh?
    Only their Rebbe is a true tzaddik.
    Only their Rebbe can be the Nosi haDor.
    All true Torah thoughts can be found in the Tanya, Igros, or other kisavim of one of the Rebbes of Lubavitch.
    All worth gedolei Yisroel were at one time talmidim of “der Rebbe.”
    Only their mikvaos are kosher.
    Can this nonsense end already?

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