simcha man

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  • in reply to: Please Help us with your Vote #877292
    simcha man
    Member

    If you read the instructions, it’s one vote per valid email address. So if you have a few email addresses…

    in reply to: Mice in mein hoiz #994224
    simcha man
    Member

    1) Stuff steal-wool under the door.

    2) If they’re in your house already and not going out, use the spring type of mouse trap with a piece of shredded cheese. Follow the directions for setting up the traps and make sure to use GLOVES and not your bare hands.

    Good luck!

    in reply to: Any computer doctors out there? #784460
    simcha man
    Member

    Do NOT pop off the keys! It’s almost impossible to do so without removing them permanently. It sounds like something is stuck under the keys – a can of dust destroyer may do the job.

    A temporary solution would be to open an existing document and copy the w, s, and x and paste them wherever they’re needed on the page you’re working on.

    Good luck!

    in reply to: MBYHSFGO? #1005944
    simcha man
    Member

    You better believe I am!

    Uh what is an MBY(HB)HSFGO?

    in reply to: Dear Niece #764103
    simcha man
    Member

    I don’t know how old your niece is, but you never know what is going through her mind. This may just be her reaction to her fear that this may happen to her as well. A well liked uncle is struggling so; as far as she can see he’s “normal” yet he still can’t seem to find a wife. If you’re having such a rough time, who’s to say that her “parsha” will be any smoother. It’s quite frightening for a teenager to observe an adult going through trying times and imagine that when he/she reaches that stage it will be any different.

    in reply to: singles dont give up! #752520
    simcha man
    Member

    whatrutalkingabt, I agree with you. Some things are uncompromisable. So he/she is shorter/taller than you wanted – in the greater spectrum, how much does that matter? If there’s a blemish in middos and/or emotional wellbeing that’s another story. There are things one cannot settle on.

    When trying to push a shidduch, someone said to me, “Maybe it’s not the right one, but is it the wrong one?”

    In my opinion, if it’s not right it’s wrong! You can’t force a square peg into a round hole.

    in reply to: Coming late #752532
    simcha man
    Member

    I’ll be pleasantly surprised if I get any of the money I’m owed before Pesach.

    in reply to: Coming late #752529
    simcha man
    Member

    If the paycheck’s late the boss has no say.

    in reply to: Waiting For An Older Sibling #1164674
    simcha man
    Member

    I’m extremely close with my older sister. I did not want to go ahead of her, but was told that I should start dating. (Many of my friends were married with 2 kids already when I started.) Within the year, my sister B”H met her husband. Two years “into the Parshah,” my younger brother came home from E”Y and was chalishing to begin dating. As painful as it was, I kept saying that I have no right to hold him back from performing the mitzvah.

    My advice to parents with multiple children dating at the same time is to consider the feelings of all those involved. It is very painful, when after accepting the fact that a younger sibling may get married first, and everything is a “big secret” and “hushed” so that the older sibling shouldn’t “feel hurt.” The biggest pain is often the pain of not being informed and finding out “the scoop” from outside sources.

    in reply to: Tips on Driving #746007
    simcha man
    Member

    Be menchlach! No matter who the inspector is, greet him/her with a “Good morning” and “How are you today?” Not only will the inspector look at you as person and not just “another test” but you’ll also feel calmer having spoken to him/her.

    in reply to: NYS Students Brace For Regents Examinations #686444
    simcha man
    Member

    toomuch00, here’s a link that might help you. http://jmap.org/JMAP/RegentsExamsandQuestions/3-AdobePDFs/OriginalExams/Geometry/0110ExamGE.pdf

    It’s this past January 2010 Geometry regent with the answers and the rubric. After completing the practice regent, add up your points – this is your RAW SCORE (the highest possible is an 86). The look at the rubric on the last page. Find your RAW SCORE in the white column and check the corresponding shaded cell for your SCALED SCORE. The scaled score is the only score that will show on your report card and transcript.

    Good luck!

    in reply to: NYS Students Brace For Regents Examinations #686437
    simcha man
    Member

    toomuch00, these are my observations of the Geometry regent. (Anyone is free to argue with me.)

    1) Teachers spend 1/2 the year or more on proofs. Proofs is usually about 6 points on the regent – one multiple choice question and a long answer question.

    2) Many of the multiple choice questions are based on information that is taught in grades 7 – 9.

    3) Often (at least once per regent), one question provides the students with the necessary information to answer a different question.

    4) The rubric is quite rediculous. (Though it’s not as bad as the Algebra 1 rubric.) You can get less than 50% correct and still pass the regent.

    5) The best way to study is by doing regent questions. You have another 24 hours or so – so get to work! Do the sample tests and old regents. Use your Barron’s book (I’m assuming you bought one) and jmap.org. No matter what the results are, at the end of the day you want to know that you tried your best.

    Good luck!

    in reply to: regents diploma #686274
    simcha man
    Member

    For a regular regents diploma you only need 1 math regent – Algebra is enough. However, in order to get a regents diploma, you first have to qualify for a high school diploma which includes passing 3 years of math. (That’s the reason most schools teach Geometry and Algebra 2 as well.)

    Check out http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/gradreq/GradReq3columnStyle7_1.pdf – this page is from the New York State.

    in reply to: Funny Shidduch Stories #1227384
    simcha man
    Member

    music lover29, your story reminds me of someone who was hit by a car. The driver (an 18 year old “Yeshiva” kid) came running over and offered the victim to drive her to a doctor or to the emergency room. The victim, still in shock and still trying to figure out what actually happened, later said it was good comic relief.

    in reply to: Broken Engagements #919188
    simcha man
    Member

    Who are we to judge?

    in reply to: Have You Ever Googled Yourself? #686168
    simcha man
    Member

    That’s how I found out I was on my college honor roll.

    in reply to: Wife has an issue… #685468
    simcha man
    Member

    I’m no posek, but I can tell you two things:

    1) As many other posters mentioned – as a Rav!

    2) From my own experience, I did not think, but acted on the spot and told the boss what happened. Boy did I get a cold shoulder from the worker ever since. The worker was not fired – probably just warned, because boy did I get the cold shoulder ever since that day.

    in reply to: Where Do You Buy Your Challos For Shabbos?! #686362
    simcha man
    Member

    d a, regards to your father. I missed giving him shulem alaichem this Friday.

    Regarding Avrumy Isaac, yes I agree with you that he is a tzaddik, but I don’t think he’d appreciate us talking about his wonderful ma’asim and character. His challah, I think we could talk about. After all, that’s business.

    in reply to: Where Do You Buy Your Challos For Shabbos?! #686354
    simcha man
    Member

    I can’t believe nobody mentioned Isaac’s bakery on Avenue J (next door to Bagel Hole). Their challah is the best!

    in reply to: Reading Teacher/Specialist #928541
    simcha man
    Member

    Jobless, Hatzlacha in finding a job. I actually have a masters in teaching literacy but my experience using it did not come along as I would have imagined. I’m actually a high school teacher and I use it with my S.E. students in all subject areas (yes, including math) to help my students with comprehension skills. All I can suggest is, get into a [S.E.] school system and build up your reputation that way. It will take a few years, but if your good, your name will run before you.

    in reply to: College-Level Examination Programģ (CLEP) #683379
    simcha man
    Member

    When I was in high school, like most teenagers, I did not know what I wanted to do when I graduated. As a matter of fact, I had no intention of going to college at all – I had enough of studying and paperwork. However, my older and wiser parents very much encouraged me to take CLEP tests each year according to the subjects that I learned. I can not tell you how greatful I am that I did that. The college I went to did not accept all of my CLEP credits, but the ones that were accepted saved me a lot of money and time!

    Is it worth it? I say 100%!

    Is is a waste? I did have some CLEPs that were a “waste” but I have no regrets because I gained way more than I lost.

    1) I didn’t have to study hard for the CLEPs while I was in high school. I had jsut learned the subject that year and did some practice CLEP questions in preparation for the CLEP test. If I would have CLEPed while in college I would have had to spend days (or weeks) teaching myself the material and studying.

    2) CLEP tests are way cheaper than a college course. CLEP tests were $45-$75 (could be it’s about $100 now) and college course cost close to $1,000 each. I’ll let you do the math.

    in reply to: Share Chizuk Ideas #685556
    simcha man
    Member

    Estherh, Torahanytime.com has a large variety of speakers and shiurim. You can watch on the computer, listen on the computer, and/or download the shiurim onto an mp3 player.

    Refuah Shelaima!!

    in reply to: Ripped Off Working In Camps #685699
    simcha man
    Member

    Although you may be getting paid “peanuts,” look at it as you’re paying for the experience. What other experience does a teenager have right after high school? The only experience that fills up the resume are the low paying day camp jobs and volunteer experience. It may not pay now, but it pays in the long run.

    in reply to: Pesach Cake Recipes? #862279
    simcha man
    Member

    This recipie is combination of 3 different recipes. I’d love to give credit to each part, but I don’t remember which yeshiva cookbook/newsletter I got them from.

    Coffee Ice Cream Roll

    Ice Cream

    4 eggs

    1 C sugar

    1 C water

    1 teaspoon coffee dissolved in hot water

    Cake

    6 eggs, separated

    6 T sugar

    6 T potato starch

    Brittle

    Assembly

    Unroll the cake ? spread the ice cream on top ? sprinkle the brittle ? roll up the cake ? refreeze

    in reply to: Are Regents Necessary? #681381
    simcha man
    Member

    Oomis1105, I absolutely do not think that regents are what motivate every single student. Yes, some are motivated to learn and do well on their own accord, but some need a regent as a motivator or as a “threat” hanging over their heads to buckle down, and yes, there are even those that could not care less about the regent either.

    Although I don’t think that a regent is the answer for everyone, I agree with Bodek that there are some positive points. Even in schools where there is no curriculum advisor, for a regent curriculum one can network elsewhere. In schools with a low education level, at least the regents curriculum is covered – the student graduates with that basic knowledge.

    Ask any 9th grade math teacher if the change in curriculum from Math A to Integrated Algebra I has made a difference. Although they are basically the same, Integrated Algebra I does take longer to teach. I found that students are more focused in 9th grade because there’s a regent at the end of the year. For the last few years (Math A was only taught for a few years, before it was Math I) some students were out to lunch in 9th grade and then their parents had to get them intensive tutoring in 10th so that they would pass the regent. What many of these students don’t know (or don’t want to know) is that in order to get a regents diploma they first have to qualify for a high school diploma. If they failed 9th grade math, the regent is worth nothing unless they make it up.

    I won’t deny it; there are negative attributes to the regents. As I mentioned before, the rubric is ridiculous. Some others have mentioned that teachers don’t deviate from the curriculum and incorporate other important information into their lessons.

    Some private schools have done away with the regent and are teaching on a much higher level. In the frum circles, Manhattan High has done so.

    in reply to: Are Regents Necessary? #681369
    simcha man
    Member

    As a teacher of a regent subject, I feel that there’s a tremendous benefit to the fact that my students take my subject more seriously than they take many of the others.

    Also, as a student (and now as a teacher) I feel that there’s a benefit in the predictability of the regent questions. The way to study for a regent is by doing lots of practice exams. Don’t sit down with your notes the week of the regent! Just do practice, practice, and more practice. Look up the answers explained in the Barron’s book whenever necessary and then do some more practice.

    What I deem to be the down side of regents is the system of rating. The scoring rubric is so screwed. My weakest students, who work crazy hard to pass my tests, generally get in the 80’s on the regent. I’m happy for them; but in essence what does this 85% really mean?

    in reply to: Jokes #1200995
    simcha man
    Member
    in reply to: Who are the Quiet Girls Supposed To Marry? #897345
    simcha man
    Member

    There’s a saying in Yiddish “m’ken nisht a mench biz m’lebt mit im” – you don’t know a person until you live with him.

    I can think of quite a few people (including myself) that could be described by others as “quiet,” “shy,” and “reserved.” However, I can also tell you that most of these people have plenty to say and can even be quite hyper at times – just give them a chance to get comfortable.

    But the “quiet” boys and girls also have to be considerate of the person their dating. It’s very difficult to carry a conversation with someone who doesn’t volunteer any information and only responds with one word answers, such as “yes” and “no,” when asked questions in an effort to engage in a conversation.

    in reply to: Composed Songs #713832
    simcha man
    Member

    d a, sorry, I have no idea how much songs go for. (I’m not an official song writer.) Good Luck!

    in reply to: Composed Songs #713822
    simcha man
    Member

    Phone: (718) 854-6902 or (212) 724-9351

    Fax: (212) 362-8723

    e-mail: [email protected]

    web: http://www.sukiding.com or http://www.unclemoishy.com

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 30 total)