Court stops movement of painting allegedly looted by Nazis

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A federal judge granted a request by the estate of a late Jewish art dealer to stop an elderly German baroness from further moving a painting that it claims was looted by the Nazis.

U.S. District Judge Mary Lisi also ordered Maria-Luise Bissonnette, who inherited the painting and now lives in Providence, to permit representatives from Max Stern’s estate to inspect the artwork and ensure it is being stored properly and in appropriate condition.

The Canadian foundation that inherited Stern’s estate filed a lawsuit in federal court in Providence to reclaim the 19th century painting, by Franz Xaver Winterhalter.

The painting was auctioned under duress after the Nazis forced Stern to close a family gallery in 1937 under the German government’s anti-Jewish laws, according to the suit.

The painting was acquired by Bissonnette’s stepfather, Karl Wilharm, and was later inherited by the woman.

Lawyers for the plaintiffs say Bissonnette secretly rushed the painting to Germany after learning the estate was considering a lawsuit. Bissonnette said that she and her family had done nothing wrong.

Lisi said Bissonnette could not move the painting again without court permission.

The two sides had been negotiating but have reached an impasse, Samuel Zurier, a lawyer for the estate, told the judge.

(Source: Associated Press)


2 COMMENTS

  1. is this the max stern z”l who gave so much $$$ to torah, built up hartz mountain and the meadowlands?????

    he came to america with nothing, and built so m uch for torah!!!!