mik5

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  • in reply to: Sefiras HaOmer Issues #1266262

    mik5
    Participant

    Some Poskim  (including Harav Moshe Feinstein Zatzal  in Igros Moshe ibid.) maintain that in certain instances and with the guidance of a Rav, one may switch his/her “33 days” from year to year if necessary (hataras nedarim may be necessary in order to do this), while others are stringent and maintain that one must continually follow the same minhag each year. (See Michtavim U’ma’amarim from the Gaon Harav Elazar Menachem Mann Shach Zatzal vol. 6 page 71 for the reasoning why changing would not be permitted.)

    in reply to: What does Zionism mean to you? #1266227

    mik5
    Participant

    The sefer Vayoel Moshe will answer all the above questions.

    Just because something is not mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch doesn’t mean that it’s not a real Halacha. The laws of lashon hara are not enumerated in the Shulchan Aruch. So lashon hara isn’t a real sin?

    Even if it is only a “medrash” and not a real “Halacha,” it still reflects the ratzon Hashem – and the ratzon Hashem is that we should not have a Zionist state while we are in golus.

    The vast majority of gedolim were either anti-Zionist or non-Zionist (Chofetz Chaim, Brisker Rav, Satmar Rebbe, Chazon Ish,….)

    in reply to: Sefiras HaOmer Issues #1266222

    mik5
    Participant

    Chabad Chassidim do NOT take haircuts on any day of sefira, except erev Shavuos (and erev Shabbos which erev Shavuous is a Shabbos). This is based on the Arizal, since based on kabbalah, the days of sefiras haomer are likened to Chol Hamoed and are days of din. [Don’t ask; it’s a kabbalistic thing.] There are different customs regarding which days are the correct days, so if you want to act in a way that will satisfy all opinions, then you keep the whole sefira.
    You may listen to music Chol Hamoed Pesach.
    Women technically don’t have to count but many do (according to Sephardic and kabbalistic custom, women should not count).

    Switching sefiras is a complicated question and should only be done in a case of dire need.

    in reply to: “Yom HaShoah”-A Zionist Fraud #1262470

    mik5
    Participant

    If one wanted to observe Yom HaShoah in a spiritual/ Torah way, like other days of tragedy are observed according to Jewish law and tradition, he would do so by fasting on this day. But in Nissan we are not supposed to be fasting. That already shows you how the invention of Yom HaShaoh is contrary to the spirit of the Torah, as we are unable to observe this day in the way that the Torah tells us to observe days of tragedy (erev Shabbos Chukas, Tisha Bav, etc.)

    The original proposal was to have Yom Hashoah on the day of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, which was erev Pesach. However, this “uprising” was against the Torah, as explained at length by the Gaon Rav Miller. (Look it up.)

    in reply to: Cancelling Bein Hazmanim? #1262464

    mik5
    Participant

    I personally heard from the mouth of the Gaon HaRav Leizer Ginsburg shlita (and I am paraphrasing here, but this was the gist of it) that the way to determine if someone is a ben torah (for real) is his attitude towards bein hazmanim. Is it with a sigh(Unfortunately, it will soon be bein hazmanim, and of course I have to help my family prepare for Pesach, and so on) or is it more like, “Thank G-d, it’s almost bein hazmanim. I look forward to it all year long.”

    If someone needs to be mafsik his learning to save a drowning person, he must do so – and if he doesn’t, he is a murderer without question, but the guy who did not have to be mafsik did a bigger mitzvah! It’s the same idea here.

    in reply to: Mishing on Pesach #1262460

    mik5
    Participant

    If you have bad mazel, you might open a window and a crumb of chametz will fly in and land in your food.

    That’s why I don’t want to rely on your mazel and I don’t want to eat by you on Pesach.

    If you have bad mazel, then maybe the matzos that you baked are for some reason not 100% kosher. That’s why I don’t want to rely on your matzos and I will bake my own, and rely on my own mazel.

    (I am just saying this as an example to explain those who are machmir not to mish; I personally am not machmir at all.)

    in reply to: Stories about R Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg #1262457

    mik5
    Participant

    At one point, the Gaon Rav Scheinberg made a Kiddush to celebrate the fact that he no longer felt any emotion at all when hearing the fact that the Yankees won. But it took him a while to get to that point.

    About the dirty car – It’s in the book that I mentioned.

    in reply to: Mishing on Pesach #1260497

    mik5
    Participant

    The definition of mishing (as I understand it) is that you don’t eat stuff that was produced outside of your home/ without your supervision. So whether you’re eating someone else’s food or food from the store, it’s the same thing.

    The idea is that when it comes to Pesach, where the ingestion of the slightest crumb of chametz involves an automatic issur d’oraysa, you don’t want to rely on anyone else. (Even though “one person is believed regarding an issur” … but Rav Pam (or it may have been a different gadol) said that to refrain from chametz on Pesach is something that is dependent on mazel (whatever that means*). When it comes to your own mazel, you have no choice but to rely on it. But why should you rely on somebody else’s mazel?

    Obviously, every person has free will, but there are times when a person could eat chametz through no fault of his own. Example: There is a worker in the factory who didn’t wash his hands after lunch, and a crumb of bread fell into the food. And you had the bad fortune to buy that food and eat it during Pesach. Or let’s say you opened the window on Pesach and some crumb of chametz flew in and landed in the food. It’s not your fault; you just happened to have bad mazel.

    in reply to: Mishing on Pesach #1260473

    mik5
    Participant

    If one goes to a chasuna, you can see right away who is makpid not to eat other people’s meat.

    in reply to: being edited by the MODS #1260472

    mik5
    Participant

    I hear. But when you write (let’s say) to a newspaper, they edit it (sometimes) and they obviously don’t write “Edited,” although there is a general note that the editor reserves the right to edit all letters for space/ content.

    True, however we aren’t a newspaper so the expectation of readers is not the same.

    in reply to: Stories about R Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg #1259718

    mik5
    Participant

    Rav Scheinberg was asked what one should do if he is davening SE on a plane in such a way that he is blocking something that the flight attendant needs access to, and the Rav recommended that one should point to the siddur that he is holding in his hand and she will chop that he is davening and will wait for him to finish.

    in reply to: Mishing on Pesach #1259692

    mik5
    Participant

    The minhag of some is to buy wine and matzah, due to an inability to self-produce. Although technically you could bake your own matzah, etc.

    Even if there is a mashgiach etc., nevertheless in every food factory there are workers, and these workers bring in chametz for lunch, and who knows if every single one of them washes his hands before returning to work, and if the mashgiach supervises this etc.?

    in reply to: Question for those who favor vanilla over chocolate #1259816

    mik5
    Participant

    What is the naf kamina?

    in reply to: Mishing on Pesach #1259802

    mik5
    Participant

    Joseph – So these folks would never eat (anything?) by a chasuna, or by a Kiddush, and they are never guests by anybody for Shabbos and Yom Tov? And they never eat anyone else’s mishloach manos? But they do buy processed food from stores, right?

    I know people who don’t eat meat outside of their home (Rav Miller zatzal, whose yartzeit is today, was such a person). But not to eat anything?

    in reply to: Stories about R Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg #1259202

    mik5
    Participant

    MODS: I figured you might take out that part, but it is the emes. But OK.

     

    I do not doubt the emes and it is only due to our own levels that some information is deemed not necessary to share

    in reply to: Stories about R Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg #1259184

    mik5
    Participant

    The following hanhagos and customs of the Rosh Yeshiva were collected mainly from the seder A Gadol in Our Midst.

    The great gaon and tzaddik Rav Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg zatzal was makpid to daven for the amud 3 times a day every day. He would cry by every tefilla (in certain parts, like when he reached the bracha of bonei Yerushalayim).

    He wore (at one point) 300 pairs of tzitzis. This required tremendous mesiras nefesh and causes him yissurim (skin problems), as there was a time when his apartment had no AC and he had rashes from wearing so many layers of clothing. The number of tzitzis he wore went down due to medical reasons. At one point, a person brought him a pair of tzitzis, which (if I understand correctly) Rav Scheinberg did not have the koach to put on by himself. He literally BEGGED the person to put it on him, and said, “I will give you anything you want.” (The person was reluctant to put the tzitzis on the Rosh Yeshiva, as for medical reasons he was not supposed to be wearing so many tzitzis.)

    He discouraged others from copying his minhag of wearing many pairs of tzitzis.

    All of his tzitzis were the same. (The reason he wore so many tzitzis was NOT because he wanted to be mekayem the mitzvah according to all views, but because every beged is a separate mitzvah and because there are people who don’t wear them at all.)

    He made a tnai that if any of his tzitzis should become possul, they should automatically become hefker. He was not concerned about them becoming possul on Shabbos, as there was an eruv where he lived. He did not check his tzitzis every day, but held that nowadays one should check tzitzis once a month.

    He wore tefillin the entire day, in accordance with the opinion of the Vilna Gaon. He continued to wear his tefillin long after shkia, in accordance with the ruling of the Shulchan Aruch. On Friday, he would remove his tefillin 10 minutes before shkia.

    He did  not eat bread and/or meat (I believe it was both) unless it was served at a seudas mitzvah. (Even if he himself was not by the seuda, but the bread/meat was served there, then he would eat it when it was brought to him.)

    He forbade smoking and told people that it causes lung cancer.

    In terms of psak, he was extremely makpid that Mincha should be davened before shkia. If one could not daven Mincha before shkia on Friday, he advised such a person to be mekabel Shabbos and daven Maariv twice. He also advised to daven sitting down before shkia as opposed to standing up after shkia.

    He was extremely makpid that no one should collect in his yeshiva during seder, and no one should give those who collected then (although he himself would give such a person so that he wouldn’t feel bad about not being able to collect then).

    He treated goyim (who worked in his yeshiva) with respect. He rebuked (if I remember correctly, even expelled) a bachur who got into a fist-fight with a goy in the yeshiva.

    He repeated the word “nihiye” when making a shehakol, as there are different opinions as to how it should be said.

    When counting sefira, he said both “laomer” and “baomer,” as there are different opinions as to which is correct, and he wanted to be yotzi according to all views. [However, this word is not me’akev, and even if omitted, one is yotzi, so it is not clear to me why the Rosh Yeshiva was makpid about this.)

    He permitted drinking cholov stam in America (like Rav Moshe).

    He held that it was a Chillul Hashem to drive a dirty car.

    He was makpid to daven vasikin (every day?)

    He wore Rabbeinu Tam’s tefillin.

    He would observe a taanis dibbur every Shabbos, speaking only divrei Torah, etc. but no mundane words. If he wanted to say something, he would quote a possuk from Tanach to convey what he wanted to say. [This practice the Rosh Yeshiva took on as a zechus for his sick daughter.]

    He permitted folding a tallis on its creases on Shabbos. [This was a chiddush to me, as the long-standing custom of all bnei Torah is not to fold a tallis on Shabbos.]

    edited

    in reply to: Mishing on Pesach #1259189

    mik5
    Participant

    There are people who, on Pesach, don’t eat anything that was produced outside of their home (with certain limited exceptions, like some people will buy wine or matzah from the store, while others will make their own; obviously, fruits and vegetables are not a processed food, but many people are makpid to peel them prior to eating). This minhag includes both processed foods and mishing, which are the same thing – as one is eating something that was not produced under his supervision.

    If you eat processed foods, then you are by defintion mishing. It is the same thing.

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254097

    mik5
    Participant

    The chassidim of the Tzaddik of Sanz were in Pressburg on Passover, guests at the Chasam Sofer’s table.

    When the chassidim were served kneidlach, they were in a quandary, because they had never eaten gebrokts. One chassid did not eat the kneidlach. The other reasoned, “I’m sitting at the table of the gadol hador. Who am I to be more strict than he is?” and he ate the kneidlach.

    When they reported their visit to the Tzaddik of Sanz, the latter said to the Chassid who ate the kneidlach, “You have earned Olam Haba.” To the chassid who had refused to eat them, the Tzaddik said, “You had better stand near me on Yom Kippur, and I will try to elicit forgiveness for you for trying to be frummer than the gadol hador.”

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254096

    mik5
    Participant

    Rav Y. Kamenetsky felt that halachically there is no prohibition at all with eating gebrots, and he said what he said for a different reason.

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254092

    mik5
    Participant

    For obvious reasons, I will not answer the question of whether the Chofetz Chaim was frummer than the Vilna Gaon.

    in reply to: giving someone chametz #1254091

    mik5
    Participant

    Shoprite is owned by Yidden? Who are not frum? Really? Is there chametz for sale in Shoprite right now?

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254088

    mik5
    Participant

    To say Veshomru is a question of making a hefsek in tefilla according to both the Gra and the Baal HaTanya.
    To say the Harachamnos on Shabbos – the Gaon did not say them b/c he felt that it was in the category of making personal requests. However, here the minhag is not like the Gra (unless you are a Chaim Berliner).

    It should be noted that with all due respect to the Chofetz Chaim, Rav Moshe felt that if there is a machlokes between the MB and the Aruch HaShulchan, we should go like the Aruch HaShulchan because he was a rav and the Chofetz Chaim was not a rav. However, the yeshivishe velt is noheg that the MB is the posek acharon.

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254074

    mik5
    Participant

    Again, the Chofetz Chaim permitted his family to eat gebrots. His own decision not to was a personal stringency, not meant to be copied by others.

    Much more important than the so-called “prohibition” of not eating gebrots is, for example, to keep yoshon and to be makpid about zmanim (for Mincha and krias Shema). A person has to know what is the ikar and what is tofel. People who are careful with gebrots are not necessarily careful about other things that are real halachos (e.g., lashon hara). We have to get our priorities straight.

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254069

    mik5
    Participant

    The Steipler and the Chofetz Chaim were two gedolim who did not eat gebrots (the Steipler was later mattir neder) but permitted their families to eat them. The Pri Chadash and the Vilna Gaon made fun of this chumra.

    [For the record, Reb Aryeh Leib Kagan writes about the Chofetz Chaim that the latter adopted and kept every good practice/ custom that he ever heard of.]

    If someone has a mesora not to eat gebrots, that is one thing. But in the absence of such a mesora, there is no advantage (halachically) to refrain from eating them, and his loss is bigger than his gain.

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254068

    mik5
    Participant

    Sometimes people have minhagim that are contrary to halacha. Example: The minhag of nittel nacht is contrary to halacha. The minhag of the Liska Rebbe not to eat matzah was vehemently opposed by some rabbis, including Rabbi E. Waldenberg, as being contrary to halacha.

    The minhag is to bow when saying Baruch ata Hashem in me’ein sheva Friday night. However, technically you are not supposed to bow in any place where Chazal did not institute to bow, and here we don’t find (in the Shulchan Aruch) that there is any takana to bow. Nevertheless, one should bow because that is the minhag. (Rav Elyashiv talks about it.)

    The minhag is to eat before shofar. However, according to Rav Henkin, this minhag is shelo k’din. (Rav Henkin literally begged the rosh yeshiva of BMG to abolish this minhag).

    in reply to: giving someone chametz #1254060

    mik5
    Participant

    Let’s say it is ShopRite (owned by goyim) or any other store that is owned by goyim but sells a lot of heimeshe products.

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254059

    mik5
    Participant

    A minhag cannot overrirde a chiyuv d’oraysa. The Gra felt that being strict about gebrots comes at the expense of simchas yom tov.

    Chacham Ovadia was fond of saying, ‘He who adds, subtracts.’ With every chumra, you have a loss [from another angle]. Such as those people who follow the shiur of the Chazon Ish for reviis for arba kosos (5.3 oz) but they are unable to drink the whole cup, and really the halacha is that l’chatchila you should drink the whole cup. So their chumra (of using a bigger shiur) results in a kula (they end up being yotzi only b’dieved because l’chatchila you have to drink the whole cup).

    Or people who drink to excess on Purim (to be yotzi) and perhaps as a result they miss Maariv and Krias Shema and they are mevatel a mitzvas aseh d’oraysa of krias Shema.

    Or people who have a “minhag” not to learn on nittel nacht and it comes at the expense of the chiyuv d’oraysa of talmud torah.

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254052

    mik5
    Participant

    Let’s put it this way: If the Vilna Gaon ate gebrots (and laughed about the custom not to), and the Chasam Sofer ate them, and the Chazon Ish ate them, and Rav Moshe ate them, and Rav Belsky ate them, and Rav Shmuel Berenbaum ate them, what is the point for me not to eat them? I should be a bigger tzaddik than the Chazon Ish?

    [For the record, the Steipler, whose rebbe muvkah was the Chazon Ish, did not eat gebrots until it became impossible for him to eat regular matzah due to health reasons, but that is because the Steipler’s father was Chassidic. Another issue where the Steipler did not hold like the Chazon Ish is in the matter of krias Shema. The Chazon Ish holds you can rely on the Gra’s zman without a problem, whereas the Steipler was extraordinarily careful about following the zman of the MA and was even concerned about clocks being off in shul.]

    I ate machine matzah as well as hand matzah by the seder.

    I do not follow the opinion of the Liska Rebbe, but it does make sense to minimize the amount of matzah that one eats (like the Briskers are noheg) since the most dangerous food to eat on Pesach is matzah (especially hand matza), where if it wasn’t baked properly, it would be chametz gomur.

    in reply to: Interesting Customs on Pesach #1254048

    mik5
    Participant

    No, I don’t wear tefillin on Chol Hamoed.

    in reply to: giving someone chametz #1254032

    mik5
    Participant

    If you are looking for a Shabbos goy (in those cases where amira l’akum is permissible), do you need to be certain beyond all doubt that the person you want to use is, in fact, a goy, or do you go by roiv? (E.g., Roiv people in BP who are walking on Shabbos with a cell phone in their hand and with their heads uncovered are goyim.)

    Rav Belsky said that you have to be certain beyond all doubt that he is really a goy.

    in reply to: no processed foods #1254030

    mik5
    Participant

    If the food has a reliable kosher certification for Pesach, for example OU, then certainly it is kosher bli safek.

    in reply to: giving someone chametz #1254023

    mik5
    Participant

    If it’s in Shoprite in Boro Park, roiv people in BP are Yidden.

    in reply to: This will save you from a safek issur d’oraysa #1254010

    mik5
    Participant

    Why not?

    in reply to: giving someone chametz #1254001

    mik5
    Participant

    The chametz is sealed in the bag, so I would not be handling the actual chametz.

    If you accidentally knocked over some chametz onto the floor in a store, would you leave it lying on the floor and make a Chillul Hashem?

    If you accidentally knocked over a bottle of scotch in a store on Pesach, and the contents spilled, are you allowed to pay for it?

    in reply to: This will save you from a safek issur d’oraysa #1253996

    mik5
    Participant

    Why not? Why would any G-d fearing Jew enter himself into a situation where he is possibly transgressing an issur d’oraysa?

    in reply to: giving someone chametz #1253990

    mik5
    Participant

    In this case I am obviously not going to eat it, because it’s in the store and I didn’t pay for it, so obviously I cannot eat it because then I would be a thief.

    Plus, the lady is standing there with her hand outstretched to take the bagels from me, so how I am going to eat it instead of handing it to her? That is extremely unlikely.

    in reply to: This will save you from a safek issur d’oraysa #1253984

    mik5
    Participant

    And there are also other Gedolim (besides HaGaon HaRav Kanievsky) who assur smoking. Those rabbis who allowed smoking (e.g., Rav Moshe has a teshuva about this) did so because in their days, it was not yet known just how dangerous smoking was, and if they would have known, they would have assured it as well.
    In any event, it is a machlokes haposkim involving a possible issur d’oraysa (on Yom Tov as well as any other day of the year). And safek d’oraysa lechumra.

    in reply to: How many times did you say Sh’monah Esreh tonight? #1253975

    mik5
    Participant

    BH I got it right the first time.

    in reply to: This will save you from a safek issur d’oraysa #1253969

    mik5
    Participant

    Moving a chair across the room is not a melacha.
    At worst, it is an issue of preparing on one day of yom tov for the next. Preparing is a rabbinic prohibition. Example: It is forbidden to set up the table during bein hashemashos (or during the 1st day yom tov) in preparation for the 2nd seder.

    Rav Kanievsky shlita was asked if one can smoke on Yom Tov. He replied that it is an issur d’oraysa to smoke on Yom Tov or any other day of the year. If the gadol hador says that it is an issur d’oraysa, there is nothing further to discuss.

    in reply to: Teffilin on Chol HaMoed #1253962

    mik5
    Participant

    I do not (minhag HaGra).

    in reply to: Yidden who like homemade Pesach cakes better than yearround cakes #1253441

    mik5
    Participant

    people who are too lazy to make an al hamichya

    in reply to: Drinking on Simchas Torah #1243140

    mik5
    Participant

    Nitei Gavriel Succos 102:6:9 brings from Pri Tzaddik volume 5 – Rabbi Tzadok HaKohain – 44 that the source of drinking on Simchas Torah is King Solomon and goes on to say it is a Tikun for the original sin of Adam & Chava.

    in reply to: who is "The Gadol Haddar" of America #1228564

    mik5
    Participant

    Rav Belsky was before his petira.

    Now it’s Rabbi D. Feinstein, Rabbi S. Kamenetsky, and a few others.


    mik5
    Participant

    The posuk says to send to a friend. If you send to an enemy, it is questionable if you are yotzi.

    Source: torah.org article on halachos of mishloach manos

    in reply to: Single vs double hole tzitzit #1225885

    mik5
    Participant

    Chassidim have 2 holes. This is because the tzitzis strings have to hang over the corner of the begged, not hang down – which is what happens when you have 1 hole.

    in reply to: did you make a shehecheyanu on carob? #1222941

    mik5
    Participant

    The blessing of Shehechiyanu is not recited over carob.

    And so ruled to me a known Chabad rav and posek.

    in reply to: Is this acceptable for shalach manos? #1218966

    mik5
    Participant

    The OJ wasn’t kosher enough for you? Seriously? How can orange juice be non-kosher? There were bugs in it?

    in reply to: prayers for governments #1219387

    mik5
    Participant

    The Mishna in Pirkei Avos requires us to pray for the welfare for the government, as if it were not for fear of the gov’t, one man would swallow another alive.

    in reply to: dressing up like a boy for Purim #1218938

    mik5
    Participant

    From shulchanaruchharav Web site of HaRav Yaakov Goldstein shlita:

    It is accustomed on Purim to allow males to wear the clothing of females and vice versa. This is not forbidden due to the cross-dressing prohibition as the intent is for mere joy [as opposed to promiscuity]. [Rama] [However many Poskim challenge this custom and thus practically one is not to do so.]

    in reply to: did you make a shehecheyanu on carob? #1222940

    mik5
    Participant

    From Shmais Web site:

    It is questionable whether one says a Shehecheyanu when eating bokser, since it is inedible when fresh. One must wait until it hardens a bit before it becomes edible and then the new bokser is not any more distinguishable from older stock and thus would be similar to nuts upon which no Shehecheyanu is said (see Sefer Bircas HaShir Vehashevach for further elaboration).

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