yitzyk

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Viewing 24 posts - 151 through 174 (of 174 total)
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  • in reply to: Rabbi Yitzchak Kimmel #1027754

    yitzyk
    Participant

    BTW – as far as Youtube ‘testimonials’… As everyone should know (though you probably have to be slightly more intelligent than the average US citizen,) you should not trust anything you see or read on the internet.

    There are numerous youtube videos ‘proving’ hundreds or things that are totally false, bogus, baloney, faked, and impossible.

    If you don’t believe me, you probably still think you can unlock a car door with a tennis ball, or use your keyless remote over a cell phone…

    That might make a good CR topic – wacky internet claims ‘proven’ by youtube testimonials!!

    And just to set the facts straight, I just did a youtube search for ‘Rabbi Kimmel’. I found 45 videos praising Rabbi Kimmel, and not even one against him. But a slightly more careful look shows that ALL 45 videos were posted by the SAME PERSON – his Gabbai (or maybe former Gabbai), Moshe Handler, all about the same time, around two years ago. So how convincing is that? They are from an Eid Echad, who was as Nogeia Bedavar as it gets. Thus, the simple answer to a question “why are there so many youtube testimonials” – it is called media advertising and it generates business. If there are a lot of ads for a product, it does not in any way mean that it is a good product.

    in reply to: Rabbi Yitzchak Kimmel #1027753

    yitzyk
    Participant

    The question was if someone who needs help can/should go to him to get advice, a brocha, or an outright miracle.

    Whether or not he has ‘supernatural’ abilities does not entirely answer the question. It depends on where it comes from, and how it is used.

    I ask my Rebbe advise all the time. I am not aware that he has any such mystical abilities. But he knows a lot of Torah, and gives me clear well-thought out practical and intelligent answers. And its free.

    It also depends on what type of person you are. I know someone that went to Rabbi Kimmel and was very impressed by his advice. To me it sounded ridiculous and useless, but to him it was like a bas kol. He was told to change all of his Mezuzos because they have ‘brown spots’ on the parchment. Sure enough, they did! I asked a sofer, and he told me that 90% or mezuzahs have them and they are 100% kosher. But even after hearing this, my friend was STILL pleased with the advice he got. He said to me (seriously) “You see! – Rabbi Kimmel knew that I had the spots, and he EVEN knew that I am the type of person that would want to be makpid to get mezuzohs without them!!” And yes, he actually changed his mezuzohs.

    If you are a person that PREFERS supernatural and mystical advice and methodology, maybe you can go there to get some. I am not passing judgement, but to me that would seem nonsensical and meaningless. He would probably know that about me as soon as I walked through his door, and either throw me out, or maybe give me practical advice instead. If I could afford it, that is.

    Note – Generic statement, not specifically about Rabbi Kimmel: Rabbi Yisroel Reisman has warned people not to go to any ‘mekubal’ that tells you to bring along your wife’s kesubah or other such important documents etc… Some of them like to find invisible problems with them and say that you can’t have good children or whatever because of that. Rabbi Reisman claims that it is wrong to passul or to create a re’asah or doubt about such things. For example a pesul on a kesubah which applies lemafreiah, for a couple that have been married for many years!

    in reply to: Rabbi Yitzchak Kimmel #1027741

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Of course I heard of him. I have even seen him on the street, as his office is near my house. The question is “has he helped anyone”. That no one seems to know.

    Everyone seems to say the exact same words about him – “He ‘knows’ things!” – whatever that means. That does not necessarily mean he can give brochos or even good advice. Google also ‘knows’ things.

    I also know that he (or maybe his Gabbai etc…) charges quite a hefty fee for his precious time – around $360!! My niece (a single girl) went to him, and could not pay that steep amount. She offered $20 and was given about ten seconds of his time – literally. Then she was thrown out (probably not literally.) Ont the other hand, they may have felt that she was not serious and was actually just wasting his time.

    Nevertheless, I try to avoid passing judgement on him without any specific evidence. Maybe the right people are being helped by him.

    Personally, I would not waste my time and money though. Rabbi Yisroel Reisman is very vocally against any young ‘Kabbalists’, and SPECIFICALLY Rabbi Kimmel. I suppose He has a bad story or two, but he is not on this forum, so please don’t believe them or repeat them unless they happened to you or your family.


    yitzyk
    Participant

    If you go back far enough, there was a time when children all knew the entire Tanach. And if you go back to the days of Shaul Hamelech, what was the expression – from Dan to Be’er Sheva they all were proficient in even the complex sugyos of …?

    in reply to: Water fountain on Shabbos #1030597

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Wow, so much detailed information and meaningful responses. I am humbled, and almost not worthy of sticking in my 2 cents. But I can’t resist. I am not trying to argue with any previous psak, I really just intend to provide technical information:

    1. The term ‘Water Fountain’ is generic, and could mean many things. Most of the responses here seem to be referring to what is actually a ‘Water Cooler’. In other words, just a ‘fountain’ could mean a dispenser with a faucet, like you find in NYC parks. No electric whatsoever. If so, in New York City, where we have good water pressure and there are no pumps involved, a simple fountain with non-electric valve (whether it be a faucet, button, bar, or lever) should pose no Shabbos issue, other that the filtering question that exists in many homes. And if unfiltered, another set of shailos, albeit not having to do with Shabbos.

    Although it is not found in NYC, I imagine that there might be places that need a pump to provide even plain water at any pressure, whether it be from a holding tank, or even a well. (Maybe in a bungalow colony?) That could be a shaila too, but really has nothing per se to do with a water fountain, as it would apply even more commonly to a household sink.

    2. Once you transition into the realm of Water Coolers, there are many different types. Some modern ones are completely electronic, including a dispenser button. Clearly a problem.

    3. On the simpler water coolers that are either fed by municipal water pressure, or a gravity fed spring water bottle, there is usually a holding tank that is kept cold. The process of dispensing water is typically completely non-electric, and does not directly activate anything. When the warm new water enters the tank, it could trigger the thermostat to turn on the compressor. That is an indirect action, but is certainly agreeable to the consumer. So the question would be if it is considered a Psik Reisha or not. One thing I think not mentioned by previous posters, is that it really ought to depend on the size of the holding tank, the quantity of water that you are removing (and thus replacing with new uncooled water) and the temperature of the newly entering water. Some coolers do not turn on until many cups have been removed. Furthermore, there might even be a purposeful delay built into the thermostat to extend the life of the compressor (preventing it from turning off and then on again too soon.) This could all change whether it is a Psik Reisha or not.

    in reply to: The correct pronunciation of "Expecto Patronum" #1066770

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Niskatnu Hadoros. What the Noda BeYehudah felt was so poshut that even schoolchildren know, is totally unknown to many Jews today.

    I hear them daven by the Amud sometimes and cringe.

    in reply to: Halachos of 3D Printing #1024401

    yitzyk
    Participant

    You can’t just make one fork. You have to make one for Milchig and one for Fleishig. You have to look in the seforim to determine what colors are kosher for each one.

    Then you can debate if ABS plastic utensils need tevila.

    in reply to: Who is Rashi… #1022171

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I noticed that Rashi in Taanis quoted a Tosafos!!

    in reply to: Anyone use these? (adjustable cap for tfillin shel yad) #1013247

    yitzyk
    Participant

    So I did Google it. and I still have no idea what it is. None of the links found had any pictures.

    in reply to: Jews owning pet rocks #1012912

    yitzyk
    Participant

    On shabbos, you can peek at out of the corner of your eye as you sing “Tzur Mishelo”.

    If it dies R”L, you can say “Hatzur tamim Paolo” at the levaye.

    You can give it ground coffee for breakfast.

    Name yours ‘5 miles’, then tell everyone you walked 5 miles today.

    in reply to: Dr. Watson is brilliant! #1009728

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I think you meant that the literature is kosher enough for you. There was no questions of whether Holmes was Frum. He wasn’t even Jewish!

    With any literature (even 100% Jewish books) there is always the issue of Bitul Torah. A Frum Man should be focusing his time on Torah and mitzvos, not wasting it on reading books (or posting on YWN.) Except in between, for a few minutes here and there when you need a break.

    in reply to: WHEN ZAIDY was YOUNG series Kunda lines………… #1009672

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Vus Epes an Onion?

    in reply to: Portable Matza Oven #935713

    yitzyk
    Participant

    The phone number for Tanurei Yerushlayim (Jerusalem Ovens) in Israel is: (011) 972 545 512-800. I don’t think they speak English, so if necessary have a translator call for you.

    It is probably too late to get one in time for this year, but since this post was started last year and is still going, it is likely that it will still be seen next year, or someone may take down the number now, to buy one next year.

    in reply to: Rav Millers Ten Commandments of Marriage #1044300

    yitzyk
    Participant

    You can probably find one of his shiurim with them on Kol Haloshon. Why not get them straight from his holy words, instead of from here?

    Technically, it is still coming from the internet, but you know what I mean.

    in reply to: How to kasher sinks for Pesach #1070568

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I appreciate the explanation. I am very relieved. I am not a posek or rav, just a Bal Habayis. And YWN is not a Halacha Sefer. So I still don’t know whether there is any source to be machmir or not, but at least now I don’t feel bad about all of the past years that I just did Irui from a Kli Rishon. (Maybe there is a shita that argues against the whole method of Hagalah using just Irui?)

    Although it is important to know and understand the sources of Kulos and Chumros, it is wrong to call a chumra a fool. Just look at the Shulchan Aruch, Remah, and Mishnah Berurah. I just learned through about half of M”B Chelek 5, and in some places there are indeed chumros on top of chumros for even a slight Chashash. And then in other places he says that it is only a minor chashash anyway, so you could be someich on bitul or Rov or something similar. The inconsistency and confusion had my head spinning.

    in reply to: Portable Matza Oven #935701

    yitzyk
    Participant

    The two approaches depend on what you are trying to make. If you want a real matzah bakery, just portable and small scale, you need a real gas-fired oven. Twisted’s idea sounds like an electric skillet (think of a crepe maker at a fancy wedding). Similarly, you could look for a table-top electric ‘dutch’ oven, which may barely be enough if you just want to demonstrate what a matzah looks like at a show, kiruv meeting, or for a classroom. The results might not necessarily be baked fast enough to actually be kosher l’Pesach.

    in reply to: Portable Matza Oven #935700

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I don’t know the actual amount, but I just called the shul’s office, and they gave me the following information:

    The place we bought it from last year is now advertising publicly. It is called “Tanurei Yerushalayim”. They are available in two sizes. It comes with both orifice valves to work with Propane or Natural gas. If you order it enough in advance, they ship it by boat from Israel. Otherwise, it has to get sent by air.

    My shul bought the larger one last year, and had it shipped by air. The shipping was about $800, but I have no idea how much the oven was. Maybe it was 2 or 3 thousand. It is not really complicated, and might even have been much cheaper than that.

    It is a well made serious oven, not a toy. I helped them transport it, assemble it, set it up, and used it with them last year. We had it on almost the lowest temperature it could go, and it was way hotter than a pizza oven. The oven floor has stone plates, and the oven body has a domed roof to concentrate the heat, just like a brick oven. It is an excellent choice for any Matzah bakery, and the small one (though I have never seen it) might be good for a portable set up too.

    One warning though – the heat underneath and around the oven gets dangerously high. Don’t go putting one of these in your basement, on your wooden deck, or anywhere NEAR anything meltable or flammable. That does not mean you cannot use it indoors. We used it inside a storefront. You should be fine as long as you put it near a door or window, have fans and plenty of ventilation, and most important, the floor under it must be concrete, metal, stone, or something equally heat proof. We ended up laying down cement boards (aka. wonderboard) under it (after the vinyl tiles melted!)

    Also (just as a curiosity) it consumes propane faster than a normal BBQ grill. The small 20lb cylinders are not designed to release the gas so quickly, and they froze up. So we had a few and alternated them. It was just interesting. We also kept the tank in a tub of water, but I am not sure what exactly that accomplished. It probably helped insulate or defrost them?

    in reply to: How to kasher sinks for Pesach #1070566

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I have always used Mayim Roschin from a Kli Rishon (many of them in fact.) But I just learned it inside in the M”B, and it is not so pashut. When I pour a hot chicken soup pot into a smaller pot on Erev Shabbos, sometimes a hot kneidel or other ‘Davar Gush’ could fall into the sink. The same happens when straining noodles, some hot noodles miss the strainer and fall into the sink.

    According to many, a Davar Gush does not lose it’s heat, and therefore it is not called Eirui Kli Rishon, but Kli Rishon itself. As such, it would require more than just pouring water onto the sink. It would require the addition of a hot rock to bounce the water off of. This additional step (which I was considering being machmar for,) seems like too much of a hassle to attempt. An immersion heater, which actually boils the water inside the sink and does a genuine Hagalah, seems like an alternative worth looking into. I was curious if that service had one.

    Granted, there are many kulos one could rely on here. To mention a few:

    – Not everyone agrees that a solid food inside a Kli Rishon does not lose any heat when tranferred to another Kli.

    – That is not ‘Rov Tashmisho’ of the sink

    – It won’t be a Ben Yomo when the kashering will be done.

    Some people mentioned that they saw this ad on poles in flatbush/midwood. But no one remembered the phone number yet.

    in reply to: Portable Matza Oven #935695

    yitzyk
    Participant

    My shul bought a steel matzah oven from Israel. It could easily be mounted on a trailer or pickup truck. It is fueled by Propane tanks. You could also probably put wheels on it. It is a very simple steel box design, on four steel angle-iron legs.

    in reply to: Outdated Industrial Knitting Machine Needles/PartsóJunk Metal? #976486

    yitzyk
    Participant

    It depends on what type of metal and how much you have. The market also fluctuates. Steel is only about 15 cents per pound. Other metals are worth more. Copper for example is sometimes $2.50 per pound. Benson scrap metal next to the Gowanus canal pays better than Cropsey. I hope you have a few hundred pounds!

    in reply to: Lost Cabinet Screw; Need Help Replacing #928938

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Take out the matching screw from the opposite side (or from another cabinet.) Go to Corner Hardware in Brooklyn, on Nostrand Avenue near Avenue I. They have the “Hilman Fastener System” where there are hundreds of different screws and other hardware in little drawers. You can put just one screw into the supplied bags, and write the part # on the bag and take it to the register. I have found dozens of rare screws this way over the past 11 years, since I moved near them.

    They used to have even more, but unfortunately, they recently reduced their inventory to save space. Other stores that used to have the same system eliminated it due to shoplifting losses.

    in reply to: Fruits and vegetables that SHOULDN'T be refrigerated #915599

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I once put a bag of onions into the fridge by mistake. In just a day or two they become soggy and spoiled.

    in reply to: Killing A Cat #983669

    yitzyk
    Participant

    By the logic proposed by WIY, it might be okay to kill a cat if it bothers you. I am not paskening anything, just observing the logic.

    I think it is quite clear from many gemaras (once again I am not giving a psak,) that straight forward killing an animal is not “Tzar Baalei Chaim.” That is only for causing pain or prolonging a slow death.

    in reply to: Credit Card “Shtick/Fraud” – is it stealing? #650635

    yitzyk
    Participant

    The question is ridiculous! A simple ‘Yes it is Ossur for a number of reasons’ would clearly answer it, but why would anyone even ask it in the first place?! It is so obviously illegal.

    Imagine going up to the Customer Service desk of a store to return the merchandise, and the clerk asking ‘Why are you returning it?’ The honest answer would be ‘I only bought it to make money on my credit card, I intended to return it all along!’

    Are you going to ask us next ‘May I lie when answering the question?’

Viewing 24 posts - 151 through 174 (of 174 total)


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