yitzyk

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  • in reply to: Unacceptable Grammar #1741246

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I meant if you insist on the other meaning of K’Neged (against.)

    in reply to: Unacceptable Grammar #1740587

    yitzyk
    Participant

    The word K’neged clearly has two possible meanings – a) Corresponds/equivalent to, or b) Against. This dual meaning has often been used as Drush to reveal a second ‘hidden’ meaning in various pesukim or sayings of Chazal.

    One of them was quoted above from the Satmar Rebbe Zatza”l.
    Another was the drasha quoted above about Eizer K’Negdo.

    How would you explain Talmud Torah K’Neged Kulam?

    in reply to: Unacceptable Grammar #1740584

    yitzyk
    Participant

    When I heard my son refer to the Kodesh HaKodoshim (Holiest of Holies – the innermost chamber of the Beis Hamikdash) as “Kudshei Kodshim”, Ignoring the slang/accent, I corrected him, explaining that Kodshei Kodoshim are the category of Korbonos (Sacrifices including Olos and Chataos) that are Holier than regular Kodshim (such as Shelamim). Thus they can be plural. But there is only one Kodesh HaKodoshim, and it is Holier than the Kodesh (middle chamber of the Bais Hamikdash). He in turn passed my comment on to his Rebbe, who acknowledged my point.

    However, afterwards I noticed that sometimes even the Mishna and Gemara also interchanges the same supposedly incorrect term of Kodshei Kodoshim. So unless there is a Girsa correction that the Bach or other commentators failed to notice, this problem of incorrect Grammer or Word usage has been going on for thousands of years! Or else my observation on which usage is more correct is actually incorrect – but I don’t know why yet.

    in reply to: Does a convert adopted by frum parents have a bashert? #1740570

    yitzyk
    Participant

    “The seventy most difficult questions in Judaism” – Wow, that could keep the Coffee Room busy for quite a while!!

    in reply to: Unacceptable Grammar #1738645

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Trivia note: The Malbim’s peirush on Tanach includes a volume called “Tehillos” rather than “Tehillim”.

    If your set of Malbim doesn’t, that may be a modern publisher’s modification. The set in my Shul has it the way I described.

    in reply to: Does a convert adopted by frum parents have a bashert? #1738642

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Maybe the whole question is a mistake. Isn’t it possible to say that when the Gemara says that Hashem decides the Zivhugim for every fetus at conception, it is referring to ALL babies – including non-Jews? The gemara does not specify frum Jews or even Jews at all.

    If so, since HKB”H knew that the Ger would be Jewish by the time he would be ready to get married, Hashem picked out a nice Jewish girl for his Neshama.

    Just proposing a possible answer. I don’t know what the Gedolim have written about it. I have no problem being shown to be wrong. I have been right a few times in my life.

    in reply to: What to Know Before Buying a Water Cooler or Dispenser #1688146

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Are you giving advice that you forgot to include, or are you asking a question that was just not clearly worded?

    1) How much it costs.

    2) How you are planning on paying for it.

    3) Where you will be getting water to keep it filled with.

    4) They use a lot of electricity (like a mini-fridge.)

    5) Pick a style and design that has features you like.

    6) If you are Jewish, the dispenser lever/buttons, temperature controls, and overall system should be Shabbos-compatible.

    7) You need a place to put it that is very close to an Outlet, and should not have carpeting or expensive wood flooring that might get ruined by spilled water.

    And so much more. You should study the sugya for at least six months before making such a major life commitment!

    in reply to: Subway Pocketbook Snatching Alert #1682967

    yitzyk
    Participant

    So much in need of editing that it is practically incomprehensible.

    in reply to: Why Do Some Rich People Literally Think They Own The World #1681898

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Maybe it would be enough to merely ask the customer if the flowers had already been paid for – sounding like a gently reminder just in case, and also sounding like you would be totally willing to take their word on it if they say yes. Asking for a receipt implies that you would NOT take their word and need proof, or else you would make them pay even if it might possibly mean paying for it a second time.

    BTW – a few very rich people probably really do own the world.

    in reply to: Culturally sensitive Purim costumes #1678824

    yitzyk
    Participant

    A few years ago my family dressed up as “Di Gantza Chad Gadya”. One child was a goat, one was a cow, one was a Shochet, one was a fire. My costume was “the father”, with a bag of Zuzim on my belt. I wore what I thought would depict a biblical-era typical father, available online as “Shepherd”. Just a long robe and a simple head covering held on by rope headband. I like cheap and simple costumes that don’t embarrass me, and can easily be put on and off for entering shul, eating the seudah etc…

    I was really surprised while driving through a non-Jewish neighborhood (possibly Bensonhurst?) when some non-Jewish children pointed at me and called out loud to their parent – Look! Its JE*US!

    We still get a laugh at that whenever we remember it. I am laughing now.

    I haven’t seen THAT costume in the stores yet… I wonder why? Wasn’t he a famous Jew?

    in reply to: Tzniut Problems In The 5 Towns #1669497

    yitzyk
    Participant

    You are spoiling his attempt to misdirect and hijack the thread!

    in reply to: Tzniut Problems In The 5 Towns #1669311

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Re: Clothing Stores with a Hechsher – My daughter loves to shop at a specific women’s clothing store in Boro Park because the owner is not afraid to tell her customers “That looks too tight on you. Try the next size or pick a different style.” She will refuse to sell a dress that is not tznius. (This of course only works when the person tries it on in the store, and when it is for themselves.)

    She probably loses a lot of business this way, but that is precisely why my daughter goes there.

    It’s not a hechsher, and it is certainly unusual. I suppose any customer buying clothing in any store can ask their Rebbetzin if a dress is tznius enough for them if they cared (and don’t trust themselves to judge it.) You don’t need a hechsher. The food industry is very different, because the buyer can’t know if the ingredients and factory are kosher or not on their own without a hechsher.

    in reply to: Tzniut Problems In The 5 Towns #1667931

    yitzyk
    Participant

    No, it cannot be. No one is ever so OTD that they wouldn’t put an electric menorah (all 8 bulbs lit from December 25 through Jan 2) next to their tree. Even the goyim do that!

    in reply to: Tzniut Problems In The 5 Towns #1667799

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I spent a Shabbos in Cedarhurst for a simcha last year. I thought that everyone there bought their clothes on sale – 50% off!

    Not everyone in 5T has this problem. I was at a wedding last week for a cousin from Woodmere, and I was pleased that hardly anyone was not dressed tzniusdik.

    At a different wedding at the same hall just one month earlier where the Kallah was also from the 5T, the Mesader Kiddushin under the Chuppah actually waited until they draped a shmattah over the Kallah’s shoulders before saying the Brocha – that’s how undressed she was (and how frum he was B”H)! I was in the back and didn’t realize what was going on, but my wife and daughter filled me in afterwards. I stayed on the Men’s side and never looked at the Kallah, but apparently her dress was SLEEVELESS and BACKLESS!

    Oy. I don’t think there is any Orthodox sect that pretends that such a thing is acceptable, no matter how modern.

    in reply to: Summary of the Inyan article on Techeiles #1667137

    yitzyk
    Participant

    In the time of Geulah (which may already be here), Moshiach will come wearing Techeiles to make Shidduchim.

    There – I combined the three most popular CR topics into one!

    in reply to: Seeking Special Rav #1666136

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Yes, of course this is the wrong venue for getting any serious responses.

    in reply to: Who Knows what this Niggun is Called? #1666133

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I asked my son, who is an expert on old and classical Jewish Music, and he identified the tune as “Bemotzoei Yom Gila”. He did not yet tell me where and when it’s from, probably because he is at work and busy right now.

    in reply to: Worst life hacks #1666056

    yitzyk
    Participant

    – Try adding soda flavoring to a SodaStream bottle prior to carbonating it – ignoring the multiple warnings on both the bottle and machine. A friend actually did this with spectacular results! The bottle exploded, sending soda to every square inch of the entire kitchen.

    – A nephew of mine learned the very hard way why never to try extinguishing an Oil Fire in a frying pan using water. Boruch Hashem he was not harmed, but he did need to buy a new stove and hood, and repair the wall behind it too. In short, the water turns to steam droplets, encapsulated by burning oil. It essentially creates an instant explosive fireball. People have gotten horribly burned by this mistake. Yet it is not something intuitive or so obviously stupid (like some of our other joke hacks,) so many people do not realize the danger. Mitzvah Lefarsem!

    – Put an incandescent lightbulb in the microwave to watch it glow.

    – Put a metal fork in the microwave to watch it spark.

    – Having to throw out the microwave with burnt holes in the walls from those two experiments, including a melted mass of metal that used to be a fork!

    in reply to: Who Knows what this Niggun is Called? #1666028

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I think they just called it Bagleiten on the album. That might not be what it is really called. It might not even have a name – like some very old minhaggim songs, such as the tunes used for davening on Yomin Noraim and for Chassunahs. Or they may have descriptive names like “The alter Rebbe’s nigun for negel vasser.”

    in reply to: Who Knows what this Niggun is Called? #1666027

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Google had such a feature in Beta once upon a time – search for a tune. It didn’t work too well for me because I only searched for Jewish stuff.

    in reply to: Freezer Joke #1666010

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Lekovod Tu B’Shvat, many bochurim in Lakewood had dates.

    Some had oranges or pomegranates too.

    in reply to: Seeking Special Rav #1666001

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I know of a Rav that allegedly could help someone in Spiritual need, as long as he is not in Financial need. Because this Rav definitely fits your description of “Any resources … would be greatly appreciated.”

    Meaning he charges lots of money to help people.

    Nevertheless, people have claimed to be helped by him, so maybe (they believe) it was not a waste of money. But if you are poor – seek elsewhere.

    in reply to: Please recommend me a good business start up book #1663416

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Choshen Mishpat by R’ Yosef Cairo

    in reply to: Worst life hacks #1663355

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Duct Tape and Rags instead of a proper coat.

    A newspaper over your head instead of an umbrella.

    Washing Mayim Achronim with a cup of expensive scotch instead of water. (And do it on the floor under the table.)

    Parking by a hydrant or double parking instead of parking legally a block away.

    Using plain water instead of Anti-Freeze + water. OR using any wrong fluid in a car instead of the proper one (e.g. Motor Oil instead of Brake Fluid, Diesel Fuel instead of regular unleaded.)

    in reply to: Yeshiva Fundrasing using Cigar Rolling and Wine Tasting #1660538

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Besides – who said anything about smoking? The wine will be tasted, but maybe the cigars will just be rolled? And maybe sniffed?

    in reply to: Yeshiva Fundrasing using Cigar Rolling and Wine Tasting #1660536

    yitzyk
    Participant

    How can they approve it or not if they haven’t tasted them yet? Once they taste them, the Cigars and Wine will bear a label Approved by Yeshiva Board!

    But seriously – what exactly is so wrong with this, other than the general issur of smoking that so many people seem to not agree with? If a Yeshiva really wants big donations, they need to attract wealthy donors. A cotton-candy tasting event is not going to cut it. The “bessere menshin” think that they appreciate good wine and good cigars, and therefore this could have been a great idea.

    Until some nudniks protested and brought them bad hype instead. This is an old story – Just because you don’t like an idea and wouldn’t show up yourself, why do you have to ruin it for everyone else? It isn’t exactly a chiyuv of LeHafrusha MeIssura.

    in reply to: Google Home, asking “OK Google” can have bad results? #1659410

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I asked Google where I can find Daas Torah?

    Answer is from Wikipedia:
    Daas Torah is a concept in Haredi Judaism according to which Jews should seek the input of rabbinic scholars not just on matters of Jewish law, but on all important life matters, on the grounds that knowledge of the Torah aids everything in life. In Hasidic circles, a rebbe is often regarded as having extraordinary spiritual powers and is sought for personal advice in all pursuits of life by his followers. The views and edicts of a rebbe are considered to be an expression of Da’as Torah.

    Definitely not on the coffee room!!

    in reply to: Is it Bittual Torah to learn to be a Marksman? #1614097

    yitzyk
    Participant

    “decent gun owners must exercise self-discipline and allow themselves and their genuine motives to be placed on a register and be regularly monitored.”

    One thing about guns that my father was worried about. I asked him why he didn’t buy any guns (legally) and he said – when the situation eventually changes in America and becomes bad for the Jews, the first ones they will round up and shoot are the ones on their list that they know own guns and are a threat to them.

    Maybe paranoid, but it has happened before elsewhere, and just because it didn’t happen here yet, doesn’t mean that it never could happen.

    in reply to: Is it Bittual Torah to learn to be a Marksman? #1614086

    yitzyk
    Participant

    BTW – my father was a marksman in the US Army. He learned it during his 2 year tour of duty. He was drafted in 1952, not during any wartime. He was not in Yeshiva anyway – even back then they only accepted the best students.

    He never did anything with it after he came back home. He didn’t carry a gun or shoot any terrorists. But he still had the skills many years later. He taught me to shoot and was still a crack shot, even with aging eyesight and shaky hands.

    But we always considered it just a game or hobby. We never considered that there might be a question of bringing guns to shul.

    in reply to: Is it Bittual Torah to learn to be a Marksman? #1614081

    yitzyk
    Participant

    CTL – “I don’t believe private citizens should have guns in the USA”

    You seem to disagree with the Bill of Rights.

    —————————————————————–

    There is a famous story of the Chofetz Chaim, who was asked by a non-religious father to daven for his son that was to be drafted into the (Austrian?) army. (Note – The son was presumably not learning Torah at the time.) He refused the request and said “Vos Iz Shleck as Er Vet Lernin Tzu Shissin?” – ‘What is so bad if he learns how to shoot?’

    The father went home angry and never forgave the Chofetz Chaim. The son did indeed get drafted. Then came WW2, and the son found himself running away from the Germans in the forest along with a group of other Jewish young men. They were discovered by non-Jewish Partisons (non-army independent freedom fighters) who were ready to kill them to prevent them from drawing attention from the Germans. This man spoke up in their defense by offering to join them with his expertise in weapons on condition they take all of them together. They accepted him and thus he saved not only himself, but a group of other young Jewish men as well.

    The son realized then the Chochma of the saintly Chofetz Chaim, and regretted only that his father never lived to understand the truth.

    I am quoting a story I last heard some 15 years ago. Excuse me if I messed up some of the details. The punchline is still relevant – ‘What’s so bad if you learn to shoot?’ (But maybe not during Seder. Use your Bein Hazmanim or other off time.)

    in reply to: Kapitel Yud Gimmel #1605545

    yitzyk
    Participant

    GH – are you not aware that saying Kapittel 13 thirteen times does in fact fit into the category of Tefillah? You said it yourself – “there is nothing more effective than direct teffilah from the heart to the Ebeshter. He doesn’t need/want intermediaries or mystical accessories”. In other words, saying Tehillim is a good ‘Segullah’.

    There are numerous sources (that all agree to) that there are specific Perakim of Tehillim that are more appropriate for certain times of need. Doesn’t everyone say Perek 16 and/or 91 at a Levaye?

    I don’t know the source of this one and never heard of it, but unlike other crazy segulos, this one probably won’t do harm and is muttar.

    in reply to: The stupid kind of gun control #1605525

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I think you mis-read the OP. He is not asking whether of not gun-control laws make sense. He asked, assuming that there are in fact going to be (or already are) gun-control laws, why are they not enforced?

    There was probably an assumption that we would know what he is referring to – but I don’t. From the question and CTL’s response I am guessing that some law was proposed that is un-enforceable or will purposefully be looked away from to allow things to continue as is but to nevertheless have the law ‘on the books’.

    in reply to: Question on R Miller (maybe joe will answer) #1580629

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I think it is perfectly logical.

    If you do nothing to actually counter-act the Bris, you are Yotzeh having a Bris and aren’t Chayav Kores.

    But if you expect the huge rewards that come with having a bris – which you did nothing to get and in fact seemed to show displeasure, you have to show satisfaction and acknowledge your consent.

    in reply to: Using an Image of A Rabbi for Shmira #1578456

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Regarding icemelter’s questioning why we need pictures to ‘see’ our chachomim in front of our ‘eyes’, when past generations never did –

    The Chofetz Chaim writes in one of his kuntreisim (I forgot which one because I have been learning them all from my ‘Kol Kisvei Chofetz Chaim’, but I could find it if anyone doubts me,) about the invention of the camera and voice recorder in his times. He says in past generations, when people learned the mishnah that says ‘Ayin Ro’eh, V’Ozen Shomaas, V’Chol Maasecha Nichtavim’ (An Eye sees, an Ear Hears, and all of your actions are being written down, for playback on the Yom Hadin) they used to believe it completely. Due to the degradation of our spiritual level, we no longer believe it so easily. So Hashem caused the inventions to happen so that we can now realize – if even a human can use a machine to record verbatim a voice conversation or a picture, surely in Shomayim they are recording every word. How much more so that should apply to today’s real-time video and audio recordings that are everywhere, on dash-cams and security cameras. Hashem has at least HD cameras!

    We can extrapolate that the same might apply to our fear of sin. Whereas for Yosef Hatzaddik in Mizrayim the mere thought of his father’s face (whom he hadn’t seen in a year) was enough to stop him from sinning, today we need an actual photograph to make a difference. Someday, to stop us from sinning, we might need 3-D life-like android robots that look like our Rebbeim following us around giving us mussar all day long!

    If the Yetzer Horah can use the latest updated technology to entrap us, we need to fight back with better equipment.

    in reply to: Using an Image of A Rabbi for Shmira #1576903

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Sure, keeping a picture of your Rebbe (not just any rabbi) might protect you – from sinning! And that’s only if you think of him looking at you, not some magical segulah.

    A few weeks ago someone sent around a video/photo story about a person who parked illegally near a shul, and the rabbi thought he was going to get a ticket, even though he had a picture of R’ Shayele Keresteirer on his dashboard. After davening, the Rabbi saw that the ticket the guy got was mistakenly written to a non-existing address, and was so impressed that the ‘segulah of R’ Shayele’ worked! And then someone sent around the ‘Moifes’ to hundreds of people, including pictures of the invalid ticket with the wrong address.

    Later, some smart person used the photo to look up the perpetrator’s license number on the NYC Parking Violations website, and discovered that the fool apparently parked illegally every day and got tickets. So he had 200 valid tickets, but the one time he got an invalid ticket, it was a miracle due to the picture on his dashboard? More like the inevitable occasional incompetence of the traffic cop.

    in reply to: Where are all our cool robots? #1569650

    yitzyk
    Participant

    A friend of mine is a Mashgiach for a large Kashrus organization, and was once sent to China. He has many fascinating stories to tell from just that one trip. One of them is very relevant as one possible answer to this question.

    He visited a factory that uses cabbage to manufacture some food ingredient. Trucks come in the gate of the factory and stop near the building. A man then unloads the cabbage from the truck and carries it 20 feet to a hopper, where he dumps them in to begin the processing. He asked the boss why he doesn’t just install a conveyor belt that goes from the trucks to the hopper?

    He answered that a conveyor belt would cost $12,000 and if it broke down, the entire production would be held up while waiting for repair or parts. The man OTOH gets paid $100 per month (!) and he can therefore feed a man and his family for ten years for the same cost as the conveyor belt. (No payroll tax or health benefits obviously.) And if the man should break his leg and be unable to work? The boss pointed to gate of the factory, where a few poor unemployed men hung around all day, just waiting for that to happen so that they could immediately replace him.

    So ironically, in this model, people are cheaper than machines! And the factory owner is a hero for employing people instead of replacing them with machines.

    in reply to: Parnassa from Hashem? #1568703

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Since someone mentioned how in some circles, Work is a 4-letter word, let me quote from a recent edition of Rav Miller’s Q&A from the Toras Avigdor foundation. It is one of my favorite responsas:

    Q: The Rav has spoken to us often about common sense being an important part of how we approach certain questions. Wouldn’t common sense tell us that one has to work in order to make a living? So is sitting in kollel common sense?

    A: You have to know that you have touched on a very important subject. If a person has funds or his wife is an idealist and she prefers to work so that her husband can sit and learn, then as long as she prefers that, it will be a mitzvah to continue to learn in the kollel. But if she does not want or is not able to work, then he is michuyav, he is obligated, to support his wife. He made a kinyan when he got married. He committed himself. “Ana eflach.” I am going to work. “Ana eizan.” I am going to support my wife. He’s michuyav to go to work.
    It’s impossible for a decent man who doesn’t have any income to continue learning when he doesn’t have any way to support his family. Certainly he’s a choiteh! Certainly he’s a sinner; no question about it. And those people who dodge their responsibility and they therefore live in poverty and they’re suffering all kinds of troubles – just because they’re not willing to go out and support their families – those people are “asidin li’tein es ha’din.” No question about it. To be in kollel when it’s possible to be in kollel is a beautiful ideal. But when it’s not possible, it becomes a cheit, a sin.
    TAPE # E-189 (June 1999)


    yitzyk
    Participant

    There were some great tzaddikim that bought lottery tickets. Not everyone agrees, but certainly Yesh Al Mi Lismoch, so it can’t be totally assur or a P’sul.

    Certainly it must have only been occasionally, because Leis Man D’Palig that buying it regularly is a waste of money.

    There is a Chassidishe legend about a certain tzaddik who learned and did chessed every minute of the day. Once every few months when funds ran low, he did his ‘Hishtadlus’ by buying a lottery ticket (and winning apparently.) But I think no one today is on that level of bitachon and Melumad Binissim (a Baal Mofes).

    in reply to: Greengrocers are hypocrites! (T) #1567977

    yitzyk
    Participant

    See tosafos, who posits that perhaps ballet slippers are not shoes. Thus we can reconcile the two views by the greengrocers. But we should also consider whether one of the greengrocers was a talmud of Shammai and the other of Hillel…

    Or one of them came from a town that has non-slip sidewalks, so public safety was not diminished by allowing personal freedom.

    in reply to: How important is it to you to have a nice mailbox? #1560901

    yitzyk
    Participant

    I am not complaining, I enjoy your detailed explanations. Especially because of your profession and education, you include details that no one else would, with legal and historical reasons.

    in reply to: Question on Brachah of a certain Derivative of an Unspecified Plant #1560855

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Swallowing something does not mean it’s a ‘consumable’. You can swallow tissues too. The purpose of swallowing unflavored tablets or capsules is to get it inside your stomach, without providing any enjoyment or benefit to your mouth or throat. That is why we don’t make a brocha on medicine. If oral medication has flavor and sweetener, it might indeed need a brocha (and a hechsher too.)

    Salt is not eaten by itself, and if eaten by itself for health reasons (?) will indeed need a brocha – unless it is harmful. in which case it is not ‘supposed to be consumed.’

    In any case, my point was just that the OP was so vague, that I failed to understand what he meant. I proposed a few possibilities.

    in reply to: How important is it to you to have a nice mailbox? #1560496

    yitzyk
    Participant

    “My neighbor broke my mailbox with a screw driver.” – Shulem, you had a mailbox with a screwdriver? I can’t picture that. It’s a shame that your neighbor broke it. How did it happen?

    This innocuous thread has had me laughing all the way from the start. Sorry CTL, but Joseph was funny, even though not very polite. And your response did not disappoint, at least in the depth of detail and history, even though it was modest. You even managed to get the word Grandfather in there!

    And Lightbrite’s question, though innocent, just made the joke that much funnier.

    All this was only funny because I knew exactly what the joke was making fun of, right from the title.


    yitzyk
    Participant

    Maybe you mean chocolate. Chocolate is widely accepted as Shehakol, even though there are some good arguments that it should be a Haeitz.

    Or maybe you mean beer. Tosofos asks why we don’t make a Mezonos on beer, but concludes that we make only shehakol on liquids (except for wine.)

    Perhaps you meant instant mashed potatoes or Pringles. These are a machlokes, Rav Moshe holds that they are Ha’adamah, while many others hold that they are Shehakol.

    Besides, you said “There is a certain consumable good upon consumption of which a brachah is required.” – what ‘consumable good’ DOESN’T require a brocha?


    yitzyk
    Participant

    IDK why the first part of my post never made it here. I found a news report from Lakewood in October 2013 that warned about kids playing with these radios. The picture here on YWN of the radios is the same one used in that article. The title was “Kids on 2-Way Radios Interfere With Emergency Calls”.

    So it is not a new problem that Hatzolah has to start telling the world about.


    yitzyk
    Participant

    Of particular significance, the news reporter says “Police say the radios were taken away from the kids and later returned to their parents”.

    in reply to: Inventions that Matter #1538966

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Ah – the age-old question that was addressed in Pirkei Avos. How did they make the first set of Tongs, without Tongs! The Mishnah teaches us that Hashem created them (Yesh Meiayin) and presumably gifted them to mankind.

    Then again, even given Tongs, would you know what to do with them? How did they know to add salt to their food? or bake bread, grind wheat, or even to eat the fruit and not the wood and leaves of the tree?

    Animals are born with a certain instinct for whatever they need to survive, including what type of food they eat and where and how to find it. My guess is that mankind was also created with a certain amount of necessary knowledge. It must be, because they were created as full-grown adults and never had parents to teach and care for them.

    Bowls and lids were around at the earliest times of man. They are even mentioned in the Torah. I assume the other basics like rope and buckets came along with the tongs.

    in reply to: Inventions that Matter #1538150

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Air Conditioning
    Indoor plumbing
    Flush toilets (or toilets themselves)
    Toilet paper

    Snaps, Elastic (socks!), Plastic anything, razor blades, electric hair clippers & shavers, sneakers, dish soap, water filters, ballpoint pens, eyeglasses, telephones,

    You really ought to define some narrower parameters, such as inventions of the last decade / century / millennium. The list is really endless. If you went back 1,000 years in time, you would not recognize anything and would almost not be able to function. OTOH, if people from then came to our time, they would think we are wasteful and pampered.

    in reply to: Who Originally Recorded “Ribono Shel Olam”? #1535591

    yitzyk
    Participant

    LittleFroggie – Moshe Rabbeinu didn’t Record the RBSO. He transcribed his words. But I had the same thought when I saw the tile.

    Seriously though, if the OP still needs the answer, my son will have it. He is a ‘musicologist’, studying the origins of old Jewish music, especially anything originally released on Record.

    in reply to: Oorah Shmorg #1518487

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Is it okay to put your kids in a cage – if there are no (other) wild animals there?

    in reply to: Complaining about poor people not being poor enough #1518484

    yitzyk
    Participant

    Halevai the mispalelim would wait until the end of davening!

    If someone wants to make an appeal and asks the Gabbai for permission, he is told to wait until after davening. By then there is barely a minyan left. The rest of the collectors just walk around freely. That is typical for a busy shul in the middle of Brooklyn.

    Note that locking the door is not an option, because just like there is barely a minyan by the end of davening, there is also barely a minyan at the beginning. People continue to walk in late, and very late.

    The saddest part is that the first 10 to arrive and the last 10 to leave are mostly the same people!! To paraphrase Shabbos Zemiros – Hameachrin Lavo U’Meharririn Lotzais…

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