ipchamistabra

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Commemoration of the 20th of Sivan #1868913
    ipchamistabra
    Participant

    Polish antisemitism was a result of the Germans! in 12-something the Polish King (Kuszmirz?) invited Germans to settle in Poland and granted then a bill of rights. Jews and non-Jews flocked there, and settled in the cities. The king’s plan was to create a class of traders and build up the country. The Germans formed into guilds, as they had in Germany, and worked hard to exclude their Jewish rivals. The Priests that came with them also had what to say against the Jews from the pulpits. Eventually the Jews were expelled from many cities (in Krakow, that meant moving to a new suburb) and many took up employment with the aristocracy. This separation worked, and at least kept the two side physically apart. BTW, the Germans didn’t all assimilate. Many retained their language and customs and were called volksdeutsche. Nazi German radio broadcasts into Poland attracted a massive following amongst this group and this incited serious antisemitism. All that said, there must have been underlying antisemitism – perhaps again fostered by the volkdeutsche and their priests – for it to have taken hold so quickly and so strongly, but excessive overt signs do not appear to have been historically present during the two or three centuries of separation. During the Chmielnicki massacres, the besieged Poles sold out the Jews a few times in return for their lives to the cossacks, but that is only to be expected.

    in reply to: Being a Ger and BT #1848762
    ipchamistabra
    Participant

    I converted to Orthodox Judaism two years ago and it went well up until I went on Birthright. I felt silently judged for being a convert even though everyone was outwardly friendly and it had a lasting impact.

    I’ve been thinking about you post over yontev, and finally decided to add my few cent’s worth.

    I can see two contradictions in your story: Orthodox/Birthright; outwardly friendly/silently judging.

    I can imagine plently of readers screaming blue murder over this but I see a disrepancy between someone who claims to have been orthodox and then accepting a Birthright trip. That group is not made for Orthodox people; it is an Israeli front to indoctinate youth with zionism – nothing to do with Judaism. I’m pretty sure the group you were with were not only not orthodox, they were all/mostly/irreligious. No wonder they were judging you.

    I am also a ger. When I once attended a university symposium attended by many non-religious students, they couldn’t get over the fact and insisted on quizzing me on subjects totally unrelated to the symposium. Since I am reasonably learned (both in the subject of the symposium and in Torah) they couldn’t very well judge me, but I also felt that several of them resented me, and I’ve come across that iwhen meeting other non-religious people. Some are genuinly interested; some are genuinly surprised (why shouldn’t they be?!) and some are resentful. Occasionally virulently so.

    But none of that is sufficient reason to abandon Judaism. I really think you should look a bit deeper inside your own reasons and go beyond the reason you are presently selling. I doesn’t add up; it doesn’t compute.

    Best of luck for the future.

    in reply to: Adama Veshamayim – Avoda Zara #1712555
    ipchamistabra
    Participant

    Comment on reply #1712357 – yeshivarockstar

    Amil, all the names for the life force, be it Chi, qigong, reiki, or prana, are all Avoda Zara, as they’re designed to worship the world itself over the creator. (Read Rav Belsky’s Alternative Medicine books, for example.)

    AMil: From wikipedia
    In Hindu philosophy including yoga, Indian medicine and Indian martial arts, prana (प्राण, prāṇa; the Sanskrit word for “life force” or “vital principle”)[1] permeates reality on all levels including inanimate objects.[2] I Five types of prana, collectively known as the five vāyus, are referred to in Hindu texts. Ayurveda, tantra and Tibetan medicine all describe praṇā vāyu as the basic vāyu from which the other vāyus arise.

    It’s a deity.
    ———————————————–
    This line of argument is signature of the group that published Rav Belskys thoughts on alternative medicine. How does the final assertion follow from the quote from Wikipedia?

    in reply to: Studies on vaccines you might have missed.👨‍🔬💉🚫 #1629270
    ipchamistabra
    Participant

    It doesn’t happen immediately – as on the spot. It can happen 24 hrs later. I personally know a family in Jerusalem who have a 20 yr old (approx) child in permanent vegatitive state. That child was a beautiful lively boy – until he was vaxxed. Not too long after they got home he started having seizures, and he slowly deteriorated till by the time was about 10, he was hospitalized full-time.

    Seeing something like that is a very quick and simple way to have the greatest fear of those vaxxes.

    And for the idiot who asked: why doesn’t it happen to everybody? The researchers (even pro-vaxx) recognize that there can be a genetic predispostion – just no one has bothered to invest in trying to discover what that could be.

    in reply to: Studies on vaccines you might have missed.👨‍🔬💉🚫 #1629258
    ipchamistabra
    Participant

    To all those discussing studies of vax vs non-vax: Sure studies have been done – by a doctor who served the Amish community for many decades. Haven’t got my sourse material to hand (it’s packed away cause I’m moving house, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find.

    in reply to: Rabbi Aharon Lopiansky on Modern Othodox/Dati vs. Chareidi #1421205
    ipchamistabra
    Participant

    To Avi K:
    So I guess Rambam and all of the other Rishonim who embraced Philosophy were MO

    This really just demonstrates how little of the Rambam’s philosophy you have studied.

    in reply to: Is A Jew Permitted To Celebrate Halloween? #1392559
    ipchamistabra
    Participant

    Very easy to sell kano’us. Makes one feel all good inside. The connection to avoida zoro is tenuous – check in wikipedia: it involves remebering the dead, and perhaps the end of the harvest in celtic times. Moreover, if there was a real connection with idolatry, it would not be permitted to participate on the grounds of eivah. so some rather weak logic at the base. Add to that the multiple testimonies of Rav Pam and Rav Kaminetzki’s participation, it would appear that a reconsideration is in order.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)