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  • in reply to: Modern Orthodoxy, Chassidus, and the Rambam #712175

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Feif Un:

    What exactly is the definition of a Modern Orthodox Rabbi?

    How does a Rabbi qualify to be Modern Orthodox?

    What does it mean when one says that a Rabbi is Modern Orthodox?

    in reply to: Modern Orthodoxy, Chassidus, and the Rambam #712168

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Neither the Rambam ZT”L nor the Vilna Gaon ZT”L nor the Baal Shem Tov ZT”L did ever advocate women wearing pants, or short-sleeved or sleeveless shirts (uncovering the elbows and forearms), or shorts or short skirts (uncovering the thighs and knees), or low-cut shirts in front or back, or mixed swimming, or mixed dancing, or married women with uncovered heads.

    If you will ask any Jewish woman today why she does any of the above-mentioned things, she’ll answer that it’s because she’s “modern.”

    Or is it because she’s “Conservative” or “Reform” ?

    in reply to: Thanksgiving: Church Holiday #1146242

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    You’re absolutely right, Wolf. Please give away all of your money, so that you don’t have to handle idolatrous objects.

    That having been said, Thanksgiving is called a religious holiday, because Washington and Lincoln declared it as a religious holiday;

    “That we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations, and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions. . .”

    “To set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. . .”

    What does designating a special day to thank their god sound like to you?

    Besides the fact that we don’t celebrate non-Jewish religious holidays, don’t we thank Hashem every day for all of the kindnesses he does for us? Without needing a special day to do it?

    in reply to: Thanksgiving: Church Holiday #1146223

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Jews do not celebrate religious holidays decreed by Chukas Goyim.

    Jews celebrate holidays from the Torah or those ordained by Chazal.

    The other holidays, besides December 25 and January 1, are civil American holidays.

    in reply to: Thanksgiving: Church Holiday #1146222

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    The first official national Thanksgiving holiday was declared by President Lincoln in 1863. These were his words:

    in reply to: Thanksgiving: Church Holiday #1146221

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    The first time all colonists celebrated a Thanksgiving was in 1777, when they beat the British in a battle.

    In 1789, George Washington declared a national Thanksgiving day; but it met much opposition:

    First because, why should the problems of a few pilgrims merit a national holiday?

    in reply to: The Laboratory II – Try Your HTML & ASCII Art Experiments Here #1054001

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Is there a way to underline?

    in reply to: Very Judgemental #709509

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    “I’m happy to know you’ve completely passed the Torah and went straight to Shulchan Aruch.”

    The Shulchan Aruch is based on the laws of the Torah.

    in reply to: Very Judgemental #709506

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Exactly.

    When the Reform movement says that it’s OK to eat Trayf and to marry a non-Jew,

    and when the Conservative movement says that it’s OK to drive to Shul on Shabbos if the Shul is not within walking distance, and that it’s OK for a Kohayn to marry a divorcee,

    there is no “V’ahavta L’reiacha Kamocha and things like Shivim Panim LaTorah.”

    These are outright Torah violations, and speaking out against them is not Loshon Hora. It’s the violations that are being spoken against, not specific people violating them.

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755349

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755348

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    rabbiofberlin writes:

    Kashrus? Tznius? Shabbos & Yom Tov? Bris Mila? Taharas HaMishpacha? Shmiras HaLoshon?

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755345

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    rabbiofberlin writes:

    Then what exactly is the point of wanting to become a Jew, if you’re not going to fulfill the Mitzvos?

    Until when are you going to leave the practice of the Mitzvos? Tomorrow? Next week? Next month? Next year? When?

    in reply to: How Do You Handle halloween? #1108545

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I found this explanation of Halloween, elsewhere:

    *

    Halloween is a totally idolatrous celebration, which originated as a Celtic holiday, “Samhain” (pronounced many different ways), named after their Avodah Zarah who was “Lord of the Dead and Prince of Darkness.”

    Samhain supposedly took the “sun god” prisoner each year during the winter. On the day before the new year, which for the Celts was November 1st, Samhain called together all the dead people for a meeting. The dead people would take different forms, the really evil ones taking the form of a cat.

    Of course, this was all very scary to the Celts, so they had their galachim, called “druids,” offer sacrifices that day. They made a holiday out of this, to honor both the sun god and Samhain, lasting three days, where people would parade down the street in animal skins and other costumes.

    Then the Romans also had a holiday which, after many centuries, ended up being mixed in with Samhain Day. It’s called “Pomona Day,” named after their Avodah Zarah god of fruits.

    Then about 1,200 years ago, the Roman Catholics declared November 1st a holiday, “All Hallows Day,” in honor of their saints. Later, they added another day to this, Nov. 2, called “All Souls Day,” in honor of dead people. The Christians dressed up as saints, angels, and devils.

    They made these holidays in order to counteract Samhain’s Day (“Chukas Pagans” is against Christianity). But instead of counteracting it, people simply celebrated both the Christian and Celtic holidays at once.

    The Halloween that exists today has a mixture of the customs of Samhain’s Day, Pomona Day, All Saints Day, and All Souls Day.

    That’s what you’re celebrating on Halloween.

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755298

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    There is the definition of a Jew,

    and there is the definition of Judaism.

    Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionist “Judaism” are not Judaism. They violate the Torah. They are different religions.

    Therefore, their “rabbis” are not Rabbis. Their “conversions” are not conversions and are invalid.

    Please see:

    http://truejews.org/Igud_Historic_Declaration.htm

    A Jew is defined only by one of the following:

    1) Someone descended matrilineally from our forefather Yaakov.

    2) Someone descended matrilineally from a female who has undergone a Kosher conversion to Judaism.

    3) Someone who has undergone a Kosher conversion to Judaism, which includes belief in G-d, belief in the divine origin of the Torah and in its Mesora down the generations, belief in the 13 fundamental principles of Judaism, belief in ALL of the Torah – both the Written and the Oral, and the belief in every single one of the 613 Mitzvos and their performance.

    If a Jew C”V performs a sin, he is a Jew who has given in to his Yetzer Hara and performed a sin. His status is that he is still a Jew. However, the performance of certain sins (which the Jew continues doing and which he does not repent of) may cause him to lose the privileges of a Jew (e.g. being counted in a Minyan), while he still retains the responsibilities of a Jew.

    Judaism is defined as following the beliefs and rules of the Torah and performing the Mitzvos.

    Telling a Jew that he or she can eat Trayf, violate Shabbos, practice homosexuality, marry someone non-Jewish, not practice the Family Purity laws, and act and dress immodestly is not practicing Judaism.

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755291

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    To Cynical:

    You’re missing the point on the Teshuva on Tzitzis knots. It was put forward by “Rabbi” Shoshana Gelfand? A female Rabbi?

    The CJLS votes on issues which a Torah-observant Jew wouldn’t even consider as needing a vote. Example:

    Teshuva:

    “A member of the congregation, who is somewhat observant of the Shabbat and Festivals, but who is an avowed atheist, enjoys leading the congregation in prayer. May an avowed atheist serve as a Shliach Tzibur?”

    The laws of Shabbat and Festivals were given by G-d. The praying that one does is to G-d. The person is somewhat observant (what does that mean?) of the Shabbat and Festivals, and enjoys leading the congregation in prayer — but doesn’t believe in G-d’s existence, which is one of the 13 foundations of Judaism! The CJLS has to even discuss and take a vote on whether or not such a person may serve as Shliach Tzibur?!

    Teshuva:

    “Solemnizing the Marriage between a Kohen and a Divorcee.”

    The Torah forbids this. Yet, the CJLS takes a vote on this issue, and in the end, it votes that this is allowed, because one rabbi observes that “finding of a suitable mate is difficult, and we must accept the fact that an unequivocal condemnation of such a marriage and an unwillingness to officiate may present Judaism as arbitrary and indifferent to personal happiness and as placing legal formalisms above human values, with the result that such

    people would feel driven to leave the Synagogue and Jewish observances generally.”

    “The high intermarriage rate is of deep concern. In an instance when two Jews express their desire to marry one another, are we not beholden to remove barriers to their relationship? The high divorce rate is a reality.”

    “When a Grushah is prepared to marry a Jew, albeit a Kohen, is it appropriate for us, in this day and age, to refuse to solemnize the marriage?”

    “We, therefore, support the decision of two Jews to marry even when he is a Kohen and she is a Grushah, and a member of the Rabbinical Assembly may solemnize such marriage.”

    Yes, let’s take what the Torah says about forbidding this type of marriage, and vote to throw it away. But Cynical writes above: “The CJLS has never abrogated Shabbat, Kashrut, Taharat Mishpacha, or anything else (evidently, the ‘anything else’ doesn’t include forbidding a Kohen to marry a divorcee) . . . I still have very little problem saying that someone who drives only to shul is Shomer Shabbos.”

    Cynical also writes above:

    “The CJLS does not serve the function of a chief rabbi or rov that makes Psak Halacha. The CJLS debates Teshuvot written by its members on issues of Jewish law. After the discussion/debate, the Teshuva is put to a vote, and if it garners the required number of votes, it becomes an officially-recognized position of the Conservative Movement.”

    “The lay people sit on the committee because they can inform the rabbis of what the Jews in the pews are doing and how they feel. Lay input has always been important in Halakhic decision-making because rabbis are not supposed to pass Takanot or interpret Halakha in a way that will be impossible for their followers to carry out.”

    Yes, let’s make sure that the “rabbis” interpret halakhah only in a way that the lay people like the interpretation that the “rabbis” come up with — not necessarily in line with what is believed in the Torah. Otherwise, heaven forbid, the lay people may not want to carry it out! But wait – I thought Cynical just wrote that the CJLS does not pasken halakhah!

    From one of the Teshuvos pages:

    “The Committee on Jewish Law and Standards (CJLS) of the Rabbinical Assembly provides guidance in matters of halakhah for the Conservative movement. The individual rabbi, however, is the authority for the interpretation and application for all matters of halakhah.”

    Cynical writes:

    “These positions are not forced on anyone and simply exist to provide Conservative rabbis with multiple ways to look at issues that are likely to arise. Rabbis who step outside the bounds of what the CJLS has deemed appropriate are disciplined and risk losing their membership in the Rabbinical Assembly.”

    But if “the individual rabbi, however, is the authority for the interpretation and application for all matters of halakhah,” then how does the CJLS decide how a rabbi steps outside the bounds of what the CJLS has deemed appropriate, if the CJLS does not pasken halakhah and merely provides “guidance” ?

    Cynical wrote: “I maintained a civil discourse while many of you foamed at the mouth at the mere thought of a Conservative rabbi.”

    Whatever you wrote was “civil,” but whoever wrote objections to this non-Judaism was “foaming at the mouth.”

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755280

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Here’s are some examples of some of the Teshuvos of Conservative “Judaism:”

    “May Women Tie Tzitzis Knots?” by “Rabbi” Shoshana Gelfand.

    “Regarding the Inclusion of the Names of the Matriarchs in the First Blessing of the Amidah.”

    That’s right. Let’s take the Shmoneh Esray, which was composed by the divine inspiration of the Anshay Knesses HaGedolah, and let’s change it.

    “May an avowed Atheist serve as a Shliach Tzibur?”

    “A member of the congregation, who is somewhat observant of the Shabbat and Festivals, but who is an avowed atheist, enjoys leading the congregation in prayer. May an avowed atheist serve as a Shliach Tzibur?”

    Is anyone laughing (or crying) yet?

    Ok, folks. Let’s vote on this one.

    “Should Nesias Kapayim include Bnos Kohanim?”

    “The Status of Daughters of Kohanim and Leviyim for Aliyos.”

    “Aliyos for Couples.”

    “Placing Homosexual Rabbis in Congregations.”

    “An avowed homosexual who is a member of the Rabbinical Assembly has asked that his name be sent by the Joint Placement Commission for rabbinic placement to congregations. May the Joint Placement Commission place such a rabbi in a congregation?”

    Ok, folks. Let’s vote on this one, too!

    “The Committee on Jewish Law and Standards (CJLS) of the Rabbinical Assembly provides guidance in matters of halakhah for the Conservative movement. The individual rabbi, however, is the authority for the interpretation and application for all matters of halakhah.”

    So the CJLS decides halakhah by vote. But if the individual rabbi disagrees with the CJLS, he can interpret as he pleases!

    So, Conservative “Judaism” follows Halachah? Whose Halachah does it follow?

    in reply to: YWN Asks Rav Moshe Shternbuch About R' Yehuda Levin #703125

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Just curious: Did you check Berayshis, Perek 19, Posuk 5, the Rashi commentary? The one where Rashi ZT”L specifically states regarding, “Bring them out to us, that we may know them,” the words, “Mishkav Zochor” ?

    I wonder why the act is called Sodomy?

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755267

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Cynical writes:

    “For example, the (misquoted above) Teshuva about driving on Shabbos was passed in the early 20th century, and we know it is weak on Halakhic grounds. It is a reflection of the time when it was written, a time when it looked like people would live too far away from synagogues to attend, and it condoned driving ONLY to the synagogue, but nowhere else.”

    “I still have very little problem saying that someone who drives only to shul is Shomer Shabbos.”

    So if it was a reflection of the time when it was written, and if it is no longer relevant, and if the CJLS knows that it is weak on Halakhic grounds, why doesn’t the CJLS revoke the Teshuva of allowing someone to drive to “shul” on Shabbos? How can someone who is being Mechalel Shabbos be Shomer Shabbos ?!

    “Gays and gay marriage? Are homosexual acts permitted by the Torah and rabbinic Judaism? Clearly not. Would I stand up on a soapbox and lecture people? No, not only would I look like a fool, but people wouldn’t listen, and I would turn them off to Judaism even more. Would I perform Kiddushin for a homosexual couple? No, I don’t think that’s what Jewish law defines as a marriage. I might be able to be convinced to perform some kind of Jewishly-influenced commitment ceremony without the word marriage attached.”

    You don’t want to look like a fool in front of people. You only want to look like a fool in front of G-d, who has proclaimed the practice of homosexuality as an abomination.

    How can even a “commitment ceremony” between 2 gay people be “Jewishly-influenced,” whatever that means, if Judaism prohibits the practice of homosexuality ?!

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755252

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Cynical writes:

    “Would I perform a gay marriage? I’ve never been asked and probably not. Would I fight for their rights under American law? I haven’t been involved with this, but if push came to shove, I probably would because they deserve the same tax benefits, medical benefits, legal status, etc as a man and woman who have committed to each other in a permanent way.”

    You “probably” wouldn’t perform a gay “marriage” ? Probably?! How are you going to decide whether or not you are going to perform a gay “marriage” ? Flip a coin?

    You would fight for the rights of gay “marriage” ?

    The practice of homosexuality is considered an abomination by the Torah.

    And then you wonder why Conservative “Judaism” is not considered Judaism and why its “Rabbis” are not considered Rabbis, and why it’s “lumped” together with Reform “Judaism” ?

    in reply to: Are the Reform and Conservative Still Jewish? #755249

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Here’s the bottom line:

    Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionist “Judaism” are not Judaism. They violate the Torah. They are different religions.

    Therefore, their “Rabbis” are not Rabbis. Their “conversions” are not conversions and are invalid.

    Please see:

    http://truejews.org/Igud_Historic_Declaration.htm

    A Jew is defined only by one of the following:

    1) Someone descended matrilineally from our forefather Yaakov.

    2) Someone descended matrilineally from a female who has undergone a Kosher conversion to Judaism.

    3) Someone who has undergone a Kosher conversion to Judaism, which includes belief in the divine origin of the Torah and the performance of the 613 Mitzvos.

    If a Jew C”V performs a sin, he is a Jew who has given in to his Yetzer Hara and performed a sin. His status is that he is still a Jew.

    Judaism is defined as following the beliefs and rules of the Torah and performing the Mitzvos.

    Telling a Jew that he or she can eat Trayf, violate Shabbos, practice homosexuality, marry someone non-Jewish, not practice the Family Purity laws, and act and dress immodestly is not practicing Judaism.

    End of story.

    in reply to: MISHNIOS FOR SHELOSHIM OF Shlomo ben Kayla z"l #709655

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    To Agent Emes: You’re welcome. The post was meant to be informative. No offense was intended.

    To Oomis1105: I agree; I wish that the story would have ended differently. May Mr. Mayer Z”L rest in peace, and may he be a Maylitz Yosher for Klal Yisroel.

    in reply to: Does anyone know when the Shiloshim is for Shlomo ben Kayla z"l is #701166

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Shlomo ben Mordechai, Z”L

    in reply to: MISHNIOS FOR SHELOSHIM OF Shlomo ben Kayla z"l #709652

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    As Mr. Mayer Z”L passed away,

    please refer to him by his father’s name, from now on.

    So when you learn for his Iluy Neshama,

    please refer to him as

    Shlomo ben Mordechai, Z”L

    Thank you.

    in reply to: Segulos #1050831

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I could be wrong; but I may have read somewhere in the past,

    that if someone gives Maaser,

    then instead of making someone rich in money,

    Hashem could make him rich in something else, like good health.

    in reply to: Does a BTL help?? #700277

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Which colleges and/or Yeshivas in the USA offer BTL’s?

    in reply to: Shidduchim for Children of Balaei Teshuva #699157

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    As “myfriend” says, the problem is even seeing the mixed dancing or improperly-clad women.

    Men looking at women dancing or at improperly-clad women should be avoided whenever possible, even in the street, as it is damaging to the Neshama.

    A man who watches women dance violates the prohibition of Histaklus (observing immodesty), which is termed by the Mesilas Yesharim as Znus Ha-Aynayim.

    It’s also a shame that Pascha Bchochma’s father had to come up with an excuse for not dancing. If an Torah-observant person chooses not to join in, he should not have to make an excuse to less-observant people, if he’s not stopping anyone else from dancing.

    in reply to: Donating a Gemara to a Catholic College #698929

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I never received an answer from Kars4Kids and Oorah.

    I also emailed Jeremiah Sullivan, who wrote the article.

    He emailed back that the gift was provided by the Kars 4 Kids Literacy Initiative; but Clifford Meth did not identify which Rabbinical Adviser of his organization permitted the donation of the Talmud to the University.

    I agree with the concerns of rebdoniel and ANONYM613.

    in reply to: Shidduchim for Children of Balaei Teshuva #699143

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Nobody said that “the frum family is stuck up, and that everyone who doesn’t wear exactly the same type hat as us isn’t good enough to stand in the same room with.”

    You didn’t answer my questions.

    1) Why is it permissible to attend a Simcha in a non-Orthodox venue, according to Halacha?

    2) As “a family of many Yeshivish cousins,” which you write above that you are (and you do use the word Yeshivish);

    then when you’re at a non-Orthodox Simcha;

    how do you handle the men in your group not watching the women dance at the Simcha, without a Mechitza to maintain Tznius (which is why I asked if the men in your group sit with their backs to the dancing);

    and how do you handle the mixed dancing at the Simcha? Do you join in the mixed dancing?

    in reply to: Donating a Gemara to a Catholic College #698916

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    There’s no problem with using money intended for Jewish outreach and Kiruv, to buy a Talmud for non-Jewish priests of an idolatrous religion to learn from, that they have no business learning from?

    There’s no problem with a master’s degree in Jewish-Christian studies? What does the holy Torah have to do with an idolatrous religion? Are non-observant Jews C”V supposed to learn the New Testament?

    I emailed Kars4Kids and Oorah this morning, asking about the Talmud donation. Let’s see if I ever get an answer.

    in reply to: Shidduchim for Children of Balaei Teshuva #699137

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    1) Why is it permissible to attend a Simcha in a non-Orthodox venue? Because the Kashrus supervision is one that you accept?

    2) If you’re Yeshivish, what do the men in your group do in the Simcha room when the dancing starts? Sit with their backs to the dancing?

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