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  • in reply to: Rebbetzin Barzam #1017646

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Does anyone know?

    Thank you.

    in reply to: Supporting your son-in-law #988596

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Please understand that my previous post was not meant to C”V denigrate Torah learning.

    Its spiritual power brings good to the world.

    in reply to: Addresses of Current Gedolim #990196

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Isn’t Rabbi Kanievsky, Shlita, at 23 Rashbam St. in Bnei Brak?

    in reply to: Tinok ben Raizel #934125

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Tinok ben Raizel passed away this morning. :’-(

    http://www.theyeshivaworld.com/article.php?p=159302

    in reply to: Song Lyrics #1155202

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    DaasYochid, I was going to ask the same question.

    At the end of “Yesh Tikva” sung by Benny Friedman,

    he uses different words for the chorus.

    Can anyone else make them out, or are they written anywhere?

    Thank you.

    in reply to: Tznius in brooklyn #1087339

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Many people don’t know that whatever we do in this world has a spiritual effect in heaven.

    If we do what we’re not supposed to do,

    or if we don’t do what we’re supposed to do;

    we suffer from our actions, as a heavenly consequence.

    choppy

    + 1

    in reply to: Jew on Americas got Talent #885378

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I never wrote that I’m better than anyone or that I wear black and white, which I don’t.

    You do not “compete” with non-Jewish lawyers in a non-Jewish court.

    Each side presents its evidence, and the judge and jury render their verdict, based on the evidence.

    Practicing the law of the land is not the same as singing songs and playing music, which have a spiritual effect on the soul, depending on their origin.

    Music is a very sublime form of expression, and a person’s music is a product of the composer’s soul. Therefore, even music without words can have an effect on you.

    The Mishna Brurah (Shaar HaTziyun) brings in the name of the Shelah that a woman should not even sing a baby to sleep with a non-Jewish melody, because it can have an affect on the baby’s Nishama.

    in reply to: Jew on Americas got Talent #885374

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    By the way, when a Jew learns Torah in Kollel;

    the world is affected in a spiritual way,

    where the Torah learning brings holiness to the world

    and brings closer the arrival of Moshiach.

    When you support a Kollel,

    you are participating in the Mitzvah and get reward for it.

    in reply to: Jew on Americas got Talent #885373

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I think that there is a misconception here which needs clarification.

    Many times, the words, “Kiddush Hashem,” are used only to denote Jews acting in a way that makes them look good to non-Jews and to non-observant Jews.

    However, it is a Kiddush Hashem only if it is done within the context of a Jew living his life according to the Torah, in agreement with Hashem’s will for Jews.

    Nobody is hating anyone here. Both Howie and Edon are lovely people; but due to gaps in their Jewish upbringing, through absolutely no fault of their own, they are in a place where they are not supposed to be.

    If a Frum Jew holds the door for an elderly person and helps him carry packages and helps him pick up items that fall onto the floor, or if a Frum Jew gives up his seat to an elderly person on a bus or a train; that’s a Kiddush Hashem.

    If Edon uses his G-d-given gift to sing Zmiros at the Shabbos table or to sing in Shul; that’s a Kiddush Hashem.

    No matter how polite the non-Jewish judges find him; a Jew singing non-Jewish songs to compete with non-Jews on a TV show is not where a Jew should be in the first place, even if, unfortunately, he doesn’t know it.

    in reply to: Jew on Americas got Talent #885354

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    The issue of whether someone is Chassidish or not is irrelevant.

    The purpose of the Jew is to sanctify the world with Torah and Mitzvos.

    This isn’t it.

    in reply to: Jew on Americas got Talent #885351

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    The issues with the “Frum Oilam” do not change the fact that a Jew does not belong on that show.

    In addition to winning a million dollars, the winner also gets a show as the headliner on the Las Vegas Strip.

    Since Season Five, the show has also made the winner the headline act of a national tour with runners-up, following the final show, stopping in 25 cities in 2010.

    Is this a Kosher environment for a Jew?

    A Jew can be refined and respectful without going on that show.

    If C”V a Jew goes into a non-Kosher fast-food restaurant and orders a cheeseburger, while acting refined and respectful to the person behind the counter,

    is he performing a Kiddush Hashem?

    in reply to: SHEVA BROCHOS JOKES/GOOD LINES #902547

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Marriage in Judaism is holy, not something to make fun of.

    Why are nasty jokes necessary?

    in reply to: Missionary tactic? #866839

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Your instincts were correct.

    If the woman really dropped something,

    why didn’t she come back to pick it up?

    Was there something physically wrong with her,

    that she couldn’t pick it up herself?

    in reply to: Mildly annoyed: what people call things #989579

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Almond Milk, Coconut Milk, Rice Milk, and Soy Milk are all Parve.

    in reply to: "Where Are the Men"-Article in last week's Mishpacha #844444

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Husbands and fathers are responsible for their families and must also learn the Halochos of Tznius. They are also responsible in ensuring their wives and daughters dress according to Halacha.

    How can a Jew consider himself Torah-Observant if he does not correct his wife or daughter if her method of dressing is immodest and violates the Torah, as established by Chazal?

    Especially if he sits and learns Torah all day.

    Believing in the One G-d is a Mitzvah of Yiddishkeit. Keeping Shmiras HaLoshon is a Mitzvah of Yiddishkeit. Keeping Kashrus is a Mitzvah of Yiddishkeit. Keeping Shabbos and Yom Tov are Mitzvos of Yiddishket. Keeping Taharas HaMishpacha is a Mitzvah of married Jews. Covering the Head is a Mitzvah of married Jewish women. Keeping the Mitzvah of Tznius is a Mitzvah of a Jewish woman. It’s all a package deal.

    in reply to: "Where Are the Men"-Article in last week's Mishpacha #844442

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Hashem gives a child to BOTH a mother and a father, as a responsibility;

    and He makes BOTH parents responsible for the child’s upbringing, which makes it important for BOTH parents to know the correct Halacha.

    Instilling the correct values in a child is easier when it’s started as early in life as possible.

    If the child is over Bar Mitzvah or Bas Mitzvah age and persists in violating the Halacha, even when the parents do their best in trying to teach the correct Halacha;

    then ulimately, that child will be held responsible for the sin; NO EXCUSES. Rebelliousness is not an excuse. Not liking the way that the parent reproves is not an excuse.

    Eventually, that child will grow into an adult and will be held responsible for his or her actions, because that person deliberately did not want to observe the Halacha correctly.

    If the punishment is not received in This World, then C”V it will be received in the Next World, which is much worse.

    Jews must be aware that Hashem is watching them every second and must act and dress in the modest ways, established by Chazal.

    “Shivisi Hashem L’Negdee Tamid.”

    “I keep Hashem before me, always.”

    The Yetzer Hara tries to get us to sin and to rationalize the sin.

    It is our job to fight off the Yetzer Hara.

    in reply to: Zumba=Not Tzanuah? #931319

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    The Chareidi way of life does not allow Torah violations such as mixed dancing, mixed swimming, women wearing pants & sleeveless tops, and married women with uncovered heads. Hillel, the Rambam, and Rav Moshe ZT”L did not allow these, either.

    A husband and wife must act with modesty in front of Hashem, even when they are alone, because there are rules of the Torah that govern their behavior. They cannot do whatever they like.

    ALL Jews, whether married or unmarried, must be aware that Hashem is watching their behavior, always.

    “Shivisi Hashem L’Negdee Tamid – I keep Hashem before me, always.”

    in reply to: Kiddush Hashem or Chillul Hashem? #821463

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Kiddush Hashem is sanctifying Hashem’s name and His Torah in public.

    Chillul Hashem C”V is desecrating Hashem’s name and His Torah in public.

    If something is forbidden by the Torah, it should not be done. Period.

    Whether or not Goyim will think that Jews are “backwards and not up-to-date” is irrelevant.

    in reply to: Trophy Wives #819976

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Unfortunately, what is usually seen in a “trophy wife” today is a Sheitel extending at least halfway down her back (which doesn’t look like a married woman), short, tight dresses, or tight tops that are very glittery, and stiletto heels. Pregnant women wearing extremely-tight tops. Not exactly Tznius-dik.

    People who use the excuse, “Everyone does it,” have lost the ability to think for themselves and will, unfortunately, pay for it; either in this world, or in the Next World, where the punishment will be much worse.

    in reply to: NY AIN'T RUDE?! #815060

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    If you don’t like New York, don’t come here. No one’s forcing you.

    Stay in your nice, perfect OOT, with your nice, perfect OOTers.

    in reply to: NY AIN'T RUDE?! #815055

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    So every single NYer (including the Rabbonim) is mean and evil, and every single OOTer is nice and perfect?

    Every single NYer has an attitude, double-parks his car, and blocks you in? Every single one?

    We don’t have Chesed organizations here in NY? I hope that an OOTer never needs anything from such a organization, because it’ll probably make that person ill to receive anything from such evil people.

    If you have an issue with someone, why don’t you deal with the issue and the person, instead of bashing an entire community, which is, by the way, Loshon Hora.

    If every OOTer is nice, why do so many OOTers come to NY to look for a Shidduch? Aren’t the OOTers in their own community good enough for them?

    Is the OOTer actually considering marrying an evil NYer & contaminating the family line by bringing such a person into the family? My goodness, what’s the world coming to?

    Why do many OOTers come to NY to learn in Yeshiva here? Aren’t their own Yeshivas good enough for them?

    in reply to: Girls learning Gemorah?? #810334

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I was taught that the Halachah is that the Torah designates that only Males are supposed to do the “Shaklah V’Taryah” of learning Gemorah. (for example, Shulchan Aruch 241:6, Taz (#4), Maharil (199), Rambam Talmud Torah 1:13, Sotah 20a)

    It is permitted to teach Females, the extracted CONCLUSIONS of those discussions, the Halachah L’Maaseh, so that Females will know the proper Halachah to fulfill the Torah.

    The Mitzvah of learning Torah is on Males; therefore, the concept of Bitul Torah applies to them.

    in reply to: Supporting your son-in-law #988589

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    What ever happened to the good-old-days, when a man worked full time and learned 1 or 2 Sedarim a day, and he understood about responsibility, Parnassa, and providing for a family?

    in reply to: sunglasses are not tznius?! #802612

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I don’t understand.

    If someone is wearing sunglasses to protect his or her eyes from the sun,

    why would they be considered non-Tznius-dik?

    in reply to: Teenage girls and older chewing gum on the street #800919

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Generally speaking, unless there’s a medical necessity for chewing gum (e.g. dry mouth),

    anyone chewing gum loudly, in public, with his/her mouth open, and with a “crackling” noise and/or “popping bubbles,” looks extremely disgusting and like he/she is “chewing the cud like a cow” and shouldn’t do it.

    in reply to: Tumah in Camp – we must differentiate ourselves from the Goyim #808235

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    To Concerned Parent 2:

    I’m not certain how old your son is,

    but it could be explained to him that only a male and a female can get married;

    and that it was not 2 girls getting married, but 2 girls just acting out the roles in a play, the same way that girls sometimes perform a male role in a play, even if it’s not a mock wedding.

    in reply to: Texting on Shabbos could be worse than murder #794045

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Regarding Gehennom, I believe that the heat of fire here on Earth is 1/60 the heat of Gehennom? I wouldn’t C”V ever want to go there.

    What concerns me is that some of these texting teens say that they are keeping “Half Shabbos.” I wish that there were a way to make them realize that any Chilul Shabbos is not correct.

    in reply to: Loud and obnoxious neighbors #754475

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Aries2756: you are correct, especially when the noisemakers who refuse to cooperate are Frum Jews, which also causes a Chillul Hashem.

    When I write “noisemakers,” I mean people who make unreasonable noise, and also at unreasonable hours.

    Yogibooboo: Bracha and Hatzlacha to you and your family in your new home!

    in reply to: Ladies, do you say ??? ???? ???? and ??? ???? ????? #745482

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    MII,

    can you please tell us what type of school it is?

    For example, Bais Yaakov, Dati Leumi, etc.

    Thank you.

    in reply to: bringing babies and small children to megillah reading #743017

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    1) What happens if you’re trying to calm down a crying baby or a small child who won’t keep quiet and you miss a word and can’t catch up?

    2) What happens if you have to read to yourself, more than the certain percentage of the Megillah?

    In any case, is this an excuse to bring to Shul, babies and children who make noise during the Megillah reading or Davening?

    in reply to: bringing babies and small children to megillah reading #742991

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    No, it’s not acceptable.

    In order to get the Mitzvah of hearing the Megillah, each man AND woman must hear every word. He or she certainly can’t do that if the babies and small children can’t sit quietly and not make noise, and if the babies and children have to be constantly shushed.

    There is usually more than one Megillah reading at night and in the morning. Do the correct and decent thing, and leave your children with someone who has already heard the first Megillah reading, or who will hear the Megillah reading after you’ve attended the first Megillah reading.

    The Shul today takes the place of the Bais HaMikdash (from “Praying with Fire”). Besides your being able to get the entire Mitzvah of hearing the Megilla reading, your leaving children at home (who can’t behave properly in Shul) teaches them that they can’t come to Hashem’s House until they can sit quietly and daven or listen to the Megillah, because Hashem’s Presence is in the Shul, and one must behave with Respect towards Hashem, the King of Kings.

    A Shul is not a playground or a baby-sitting service.

    If you took a child to work with you, one day; would you let the child run around and make noise?

    So would you let your children run around and make noise in the Bais HaMikdash, the House of the King of Kings?

    So why would you bring to Shul (which is in the place of the Bais HaMikdash today) or a Megillah reading, babies and small children who cannot sit quietly?

    in reply to: Loud and obnoxious neighbors #754414

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    The Goq, I sympathize with your situation. Children should not be playing in a hallway and making noise at any time, even when it’s not Shabbos.

    Have you tried speaking to the children’s parents, in a nice way?

    in reply to: Loud and obnoxious neighbors #754410

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    “My problem is different. I live in a large apt building, and many of my young Frum neighbors think the hallway is their rec room.

    They let the kids play out there all day.”

    The Goq is correct. A hallway is just that; a hallway. It’s not a playground, where children can run around and make noise.

    If the children want to play; then let them play in their own homes, or else let them go to a playground.

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #731017

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    “You seem to imply that wearing pants is not allowed. WRONG. Check the Bach and other Poskim.”

    If you would please give me the exact quotes of “the Bach and the other Poskim,” which say that women are allowed to wear pants, I would appreciate it.

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #731007

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I guess that I had better not mention the laws of Kashrus or keeping Shabbos; because if I do, then I’m denigrating every Jew who doesn’t keep them, right?

    Dealing with the issue of what Halacha allows and doesn’t allow has nothing to do with judging specific people or their character, whether they’re nice or not nice.

    If a woman unknowingly reveals a part of the body that is supposed to be covered, or if she wears a garment that she’s not supposed to wear (even if she doesn’t know that she’s not supposed to wear it), like shorts or pants or a too-tight outfit; then according to the Halacha, she is in violation of Tznius, no matter how nice a person she is.

    An “Isha Tzadekes” is someone who keeps ALL of the Mitzvos that a woman is supposed to keep, including Good Middos AND Tznius.

    For example, if a Jew was raised without a Jewish upbringing and is a kind person, but he violates the Halacha of Shabbos; is he a Tzadik?

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #730992

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    From Tznius book:

    “All women and girls must cover all parts of their body which Chazal have classified as Ervah. These parts include: the main body (torso), including the hip area; the upper arms, including the elbows; and the upper legs, including the thighs and knees. Their status of Ervah has been established by Chazal and is not dependent on the custom of the local women. . .

    The hair of a married woman must be covered with non-see-through material (Kesubos 72).”

    If people didn’t do so years ago or don’t do so now because they didn’t know or don’t know that they were or are supposed to do so; no one is judging them, but that doesn’t make it alright to do.

    There is no such thing as “Tznius-dig by the accepted standards of TODAY.” There is only Tznius-dig by the standards of the Torah and Chazal.

    If someone didn’t keep Shabbos years ago because he was told that he would lose his job on Monday if he didn’t come to work on Shabbos; we don’t judge him, because we’re not “in his shoes.” But the action is still Chillul Shabbos.

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #730983

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Having Good Middos and acting like a Mentsh is a Mitzvah.

    (Derech Eretz Kadma L’Torah.)

    Keeping Tznius is a Mitzvah.

    Keeping Shabbos is a Mitzvah.

    Keeping Kosher is a Mitzvah.

    No one is disparaging previous generations, because they did not know any better or because they had to deal with issues that we don’t have to deal with today. No one is saying that a person does not need Good Middos and is allowed to C”V commit a Chillul Hashem.

    All that is being said is that for a Jew to keep Yiddishkeit properly, ALL of the Mitzvos must be observed.

    Acting in a Tznius-dik manner while dressing in a non-Tznius-dik manner does not make a girl Tznius-dik. Both types of Tznius must be observed.

    IY”H there should be a way to educate girls and women about Tznius, in a non-confrontational manner that teaches about the rules and rewards of Tznius, and the punishment for the lack of Tznius, C”V.

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #730973

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    “Mock” shock and horror?

    Why does it look like the concern expressed here is not genuine?

    It’s like the parable of someone who drills a hole under his own seat in a boat;

    and when the other passengers see what he’s doing and ask him to stop,

    he replies, “Mind your own business! I’m drilling only under my seat, not yours.”

    The others answer, “Even if you drill a hole only under your seat; the entire boat will sink, along with the rest of us!”

    Kol Yisroel Arayvim Zeh L’Zeh.

    If a woman dresses, speaks, or acts in a way that is not Tznius-dik; she harms not only herself, but others, too.

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #730963

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Thank you to all those who posted in support of Tznius being Halacha D’Oraisa. It is a Mitzvah, which must be kept. IY”H there should be more education in this area, so that women and girls will know what they are supposed to do and what they are not supposed to do.

    As I quoted before from “Daughters of Dignity (subtitiled: Hashkafa and Halachic Guidelines in the Noble Mitzvah of Tznius), Third Edition,” authored by Mrs. Chana Toby Friedman (who is part of the “Kol Kevudah Movement,” an organization which promotes modesty awareness and education), and which has the Haskama of such Rabbonim as Rav Pinchas Scheinberg, Shlita; Rav Ovadia Yosef, Shlita; and the Belzer Rebbe, Shlita:

    From the Introduction:

    “Dear Jewish Daughters:

    We are living in times of increased immodesty. Impure influences are threatening the sanctity of Jewish women and girls and of our entire people. The Jewish principle of modesty is under attack and in danger. . . When modesty is weakened, the Holy Shechinah disappears from Israel, Heaven forbid, as it is written:

    ‘ V’Lo Yay-roeh B’cha Ervas Davar V’Shav May-acharehcha. ‘

    ‘ In the event that Hashem will see immodesty amongst you, He will turn away from you. ‘

    It is of supreme importance for us to be particularly meticulous regarding the observance of this Mitzvah. One must vigorously pay attention to its details, lest one violate the fundamental laws for which a woman – in but a brief moment – may cause others to commit thousands of sins, thereby destroying many generations.”

    The Mitzvah of Tznius encompasses both the external (dressing properly and covering what should be covered) and the internal (modest speech and modest behavior).

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #730951

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I don’t see this matter as confined to a specific neighborhood.

    It’s an issue in the tri-state area, in general.

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #730948

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    “Also it’s a horrible thing to single out and, especially to name a school!

    b careful next time…”

    Where was a school named, in any of these posts?

    Did I miss something?

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #730946

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Tznius includes both properly covering parts of the body that are supposed to be covered (external Tznius), and also modest speech and behavior (internal Tznius).

    in reply to: tznius to wear skirts that just hit the knee or are above the knee? #730940

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    From the book, “Daughters of Dignity,” about Tznius, P. 54:

    “Immodesty drives away the Shechina. . . For when Hashem leaves us, we are left with no protection against enemies, tragedies, illnesses, Lo Alaynu. There exists no other place in the Torah where such a harsh consequence occurs as a result of sin.”

    I think that all girls’ Yeshivas, both elementary schools and high schools, should include in their curricula, guidelines about what Tznius entails, including the benefits of Tznius, and the consequences of what happens when C”V there is a lack of Tznius.

    I believe that many girls and women don’t know or don’t realize that their elbows and knees are Ervah and must be covered.

    in reply to: No Women On The Seruv List? #746799

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    It is the man who has to give the Get, in order to dissolve the marriage.

    Halachicly, if a man remarries without giving a Get to his 1st wife, the 2nd wife is not considered a bigamist, and his children from the 2nd wife are not Mamzayrim.

    However, if C”V a woman remarries without a Get from her 1st husband, she’s still considered married to her 1st husband, and any children from the 2nd marriage are Mamzayrim.

    in reply to: Marrying Out! #718307

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    So Ralph Lauren’s wife is not Jewish?

    in reply to: Shaitle Fraud Chillul Hashem Video: Sha'ar haTumah haChamishim #717849

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    The bottom line is that whether or not the plaintiffs were lying, or whether or not the dry cleaner should have washed the wig,

    this case should never have tried in front of a judge on TV. It perpetrated a huge Chillul Hashem.

    If the plaintiffs were actually lying, then they perpetrated an even bigger Chillul Hashem.

    If a Jew has a case, he should go to Small Claims Court, and take care of his claim in private, not in front of the entire public. End of story.

    in reply to: How To Avoid Handshakes #714740

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    I say: “For religious reasons of modesty, I do not shake hands with the opposite sex.”

    in reply to: Thanksgiving: Church Holiday #1146312

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, and Veterans Day are all civil American holidays, established to either honor Americans who gave outstanding service to the United States; or, as in the case of Independence Day, to celebrate the independence of the U.S. from Britain.

    Thanksgiving Day was established to specifically give thanks to their god, not just to mention their god in the proclamation.

    in reply to: Modern Orthodoxy, Chassidus, and the Rambam #712189

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Did the Rambam, Vilna Gaon, and Baal Shem Tov advocate or permit mixed dancing, mixed swimming, or married women with uncovered heads?

    in reply to: Modern Orthodoxy, Chassidus, and the Rambam #712188

    QuestionForYou
    Participant

    Feif Un:

    What kind of lifestyle do Modern Orthodox Rabbis live and teach others? Example?

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