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Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 296 total)
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  • in reply to: LONGEST THREAD EVER!! #1968878
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    If you choose a topic and start us off, you’ll have a chance. Otherwise, it’s not going to happen.

    in reply to: Hotel for Chosson and Kallah near Lakewood #1935913
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    There’s a Hilton Garden Inn on Rt 70. There’s also a Marriot Courtyard in Wall Township, about 25 min out of Lakewood

    in reply to: Public Speaking #1029385
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    scared driver delight, it sounds like you never even learnt public speaking to begin with. If you did, you would know why it’s so important and why it’s an important skill to have. I’ll give you an example. Look at Obama. He has some crazy views. However he has influenced thousands of Americans that his way is the right way. How? Through the way he speaks. The speeches that he has given has influenced thousands of Americans that he is the right man to run the country.

    I’ll give you another example. In the Book “Rabbi Sherer,” it describes how Rabbi Moshe Sherer zatzal was able to influence political figures to change the law so it coincided for halacha and so it would be better for the Jewish people. How did he do that? Through public speaking. He was an amazing speaker and was able to influence political figures that the Jewish people are important and you need to accommodate them.

    For us, public speaking is relevant as well. If someone got up and couldn’t speak in complete sentences you wouldn’t even listen to him. People would yell at him to get off the podium. If there are non jews there it could be a chillul Hashem that this person doesn’t know how to speak. (If there are only jews there, it could be an even greater chillul Hashem.)

    I have no idea if you’re a man or a woman, but how do you expect to say a dvar torah if you have no idea how to speak?

    Therefore, public speaking is very important-to know how to influence people and also if you want people to listen to you, then you have to learn how to speak so people can follow you and listen to what you have to say.

    in reply to: remove simcha from OS #1029356
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    I think they’re back in town, because they started tweeting simchas again

    in reply to: Rechnitz – There is no Shidduch Crisis #1043156
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    It seems that I’m the only one who heard this: Several years ago, BMG was thinking about changing the freezer to attempt to fix the shidduch crisis. They wanted to make a rule that you only could go to the freezer if you were 22 and a half, Pesach time. After that, you wouldn’t have to go through the freezer. One of the Lakewood Roshei yeshiva went and spoke to one of the Gedolei Hador in Eretz Yisroel about this idea. The gadol told him that the idea wouldn’t work because it wouldn’t stop anyone. If they didn’t want to go through the bmg system, they would just go somewhere else.

    in reply to: Forgetting to close the fridge light before Shabbos #1039255
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Lior, it’s a davar shaino miskaven and also it might not necessarily happen. (There’s an igros Moshe that talks about the motor running which was quoted in a previous post) In the Shabbos Kitchen on the last page, R’ Simcha Bunim Cohen shlita writes that R’ Moshe told him that you can open the fridge even while the motor is off.

    in reply to: remove simcha from OS #1029350
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    They’re probably on vacation. They haven’t tweeted any simchas since Tuesday, and I checked on the website and there have been several simchas since then

    in reply to: Dating Question….. #1028330
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Moshe kapoyer, these questions are a matter of opinion, so the best thing is to ask your mentor these questions

    in reply to: Austin,Tx has a great frum community #1029010
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Malbim, I think you should look for another city. Maybe, somewhere in montana or wyoming. 🙂

    in reply to: In Austin the Orthodox rabbi is paid $100,000 a yr #1028566
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Malbim, I don’t mean to sound mean or anything like that, but are you trying to get everyone to move to austin? You started 3 threads about it!

    and that doesn’t include the deleted ones

    in reply to: Forgetting to close the fridge light before Shabbos #1039233
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    RebYidd23, it could be that a fridge that the door opens without a light exists. But I don’t think they’re so common.

    Sam2- Usually the switch that turns off the light is right when the door enters the frame, so you’d have to be careful about that

    in reply to: Mazel Tov! #1224259
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    TBONTB, Mod 29-Thank you

    in reply to: Forgetting to close the fridge light before Shabbos #1039227
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    A friend of mine once forgot to disconnect it before shabbos. What he ended up doing is that his wife put the baby in front the fridge and the baby closed it by herself.

    I looked this up-I believe the best idea is to get a goy to close the door.

    in reply to: Mazel Tov! #1224256
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Mazel Tov to yeshivaguy45 on his engagement!

    in reply to: Poll: What's Your Favorite Nosh? #1027061
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    I used to like jolly ranchers (now I still like them but not as much as I used to)

    Twizzlers

    barbecue chips (especially pringles)

    in reply to: Ending it after 10 dates over text #1027182
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    I don’t think it was right of him to text it like that. He should have told the shadchan. However, I don’t know the full story. He didn’t want to answer her phone calls, or he was just busy? Maybe something happened and he wasn’t able to pick up the phone whenever she called. Even if he was deliberately not answering her, he still should have gone to the shadchan (and if he really was yeshivish, he wouldn’t have ended it that way. He would have gone to his rebbe who most probably would not have told him to text it.)

    in reply to: Are white skirts not tzanuah? #1034499
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    147, It could be you’re in Eretz Yisroel. Tu b’Av is on Monday.

    in reply to: Half-shabbos is spreading #1012726
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    I did research on this online just now to find out when chodosh starts. According to an article on the star-k website, the halachic problem is whatever is planted after the 4th day of pesach. That’s called the spring crop and it doesn’t hit the market until the end of the summer.

    in reply to: Half-shabbos is spreading #1012722
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    PBA, if this isn’t a troll thread, (which apparently the other posters are taking it like that) yoshon doesn’t apply from after pesach until sukkos because the the issur of yoshon is only until the new crop is harvested which is sefiras haomer, which literally means the cutting of the omer (bundles of wheat). Once that happens, there’s no issur of omer. The family didn’t literally say we keep it half the year. They said we don’t worry about it

    in reply to: Pasuk for name #1083084
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Little Froggie, sometimes people ask for other people. Another reason could be that she has 2 names. It could be anything. It really doesn’t matter why she needs to know.

    in reply to: best brand of shabbos tissues #1012489
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    DY- On Shabbos, you’re supposed to use things that you wouldn’t use during the week. (I have a feeling this is a troll thread)

    in reply to: Pasuk for name #1083082
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    I looked this up in the back of an Artscroll siddur: ?????? ???,?? ??? ? ?????? ??…

    in reply to: Mazel Tov! #1224252
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Yossi z, Mazel Tov!

    in reply to: YOU HAVE THE POWER TO STOP CANCER!! #1012497
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Several weeks ago, I listened to a shiur on cd from R’ Yitzchak Sorotzkin shlita on Kedushas Beis Haknesses and not speaking during davening. He said over several stories about this. One story was about an individual who’s daughter had cancer, lo aleinu. The doctors had told him that there was no hope for his daughter. A little while later, the man met another Yid and this yid told him that he had a similar problem and he went to a rebbe and the rebbe told him to be mekabel not to talk during davening. He said after several weeks of taking on the kabbala he went back to the doctor and there was no trace of the sickness left. This man heard the story and he took on to be mekabel not to talk during davening and his daughter was healed.

    No, we don’t know why things in this world happen. But we can take on extra zechuyos and those zechuyos can fight for us.

    in reply to: rav umoreh horaah smicha #1118570
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    From what I know, Rav Nechemia Goldberg lives in Eretz Yisroel. I googled Rav Nechemia Gold berg and I found a previous thread about this: http://www.theyeshivaworld.com/coffeeroom/topic/smicha-test

    in reply to: I'M ENGAGED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! #1013197
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Mazel Tov!

    in reply to: baseball games #1011722
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    R’ Shlomo Heiman was telling them that why are you watching a game like that and it’s better not to waste your time on such a thing. That’s why he was poking fun at it.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011721
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    DY, I agree with you. I personally know of someone who was smoking and it led to drugs.He was caught and expelled from his yeshiva. This guy couldn’t find anywhere to go, and ended up in a yeshiva for off the derech guys. Today he’s not frum. Does that mean that the rebbeim who expelled him are responsible? Does that mean that they shouldn’t have expelled him? No! He was doing something against yeshiva policy and disrupting other bochurim.

    I also know someone who was starting to go off the derech in yeshiva. He was talking to girls and skipping seder. Then slowly his life started changing. He stopped talking to girls as much and started learning more. Then his cell phone got taken away. That was a big disappointment for him and he started going back to the way he was before. He eventually left yeshiva and went to a drop out yeshiva and went downhill from there. (I haven’t seen him for awhile, but I heard he’s getting back on track.)Does this mean that the Rebbeim were wrong for doing something like that? No! They were doing something that was against the policy of yeshiva and it was disrupting other bochurim. (This bochur had several friends and so the Rebbeim knew that his cell phone was disrupting others.)

    zehavasdad, I know burning out can happen. I have a friend who snapped because he was learning too much. I know what it’s like. However there are ways how to deal with it. If you’re in that situation, you should talk to a mashgiach, or a rebbe who understands you. Don’t decide something like that on your own.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011711
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    jbaldy22, in this case you’re right. I concur with that. My point was that rebbeim do understand sports, more than you think they do.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011710
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    zahavasdad, I believe the end of the story was that the bochur was on time from then on. He took the message to heart. Bli neder, I’ll check it up again. If that was the case, then that couldn’t have been the bochur was burned out, otherwise he wouldn’t have come on time after that

    in reply to: baseball games #1011707
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    jbaldy22, the point that these Roshei Yeshivos made when they said this is that you shouldn’t look at what the goyim do for enjoyment. I’m not going to deny that it’s enjoyable. Going to movies is enjoyable and yet it’s not exactly the most kosher entertainment out there, if you know what I mean. Going to a baseball game is enjoyable, however, it’s something that shouldn’t be done, especially on chol hamoed. As I noted before, it’s not a kosher atmosphere to be in, as well as chukas hagoyim.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011704
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    old man, the point is not to intermingle with goyim. Therefore, their point is not to go to stadiums and intermingle with goyim and follow in their ways. That’s why these Roshei Yeshiva are ridiculing how the game is played to show you how stupid watching the game is. Not necessarily are they ridiculing the actual sport, but they’re ridiculing the fact that you’re watching such a game, watching how the goyim play.

    There’s a story about a bochur that missed night seder several nights in a row. His Rosh yeshiva went over to him and asked him why he was missing night seder. He said that the soccer championships were on and he didn’t want to miss it. The Rosh Yeshiva asked him, “Tell me, how do you play soccer?” The bochur answered, “There’s a net and you have to kick the ball into a net.” The Rosh Yeshiva said, That’s easy. I can kick the ball in thousands of times.” The bochur said, “No, Rebbe there’s a goalie who blocks the ball.” The Rosh Yeshiva said, “He’s there 24/7? Wait until he goes home and kick the ball when he leaves and you can win easily.” The bochur said, “No Rebbe, there are obstacles in the game. This is an obstacle and you need to overcome it.” The Rosh Yeshiva answered, “In learning, there are also obstacles, like learning when there’s a soccer championship. The same way you need to overcome the obstacles in sports, you also have to overcome the obstacles in learning.”

    (No, the point of that story is not to show you how the goyim play, but you see how Roshei Yeshiva can take sports and make a mussar shmuz out of it.)

    in reply to: baseball games #1011701
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    old man, you missed my post after that. I said that if you want to disagree with a rav, you should say it in a nicer way. Don’t say straight out that they’re wrong, because that’s not true. Say in a kavodik way that you hold differently because of x. Don’t say they’re wrong and you hold differently. Nobody needs your comments on if they’re wrong. It’s not needed, motzei shem ra and not kavodik. You need to have kavod Hatorah. It’s because of comments like that why people in the world are against the CR.

    My original discussion was NOT about following sports. You (and other posters as well) brought that in as a side note. I, and the Roshei Yeshiva who I quoted were talking about GOING to a game, not necessary FOLLOWING sports.

    I agree with jbaldy22 and OURtorah. I said earlier that this is the way I was brought up, and I was saying this whole time why I think it’s wrong to go a baseball game.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011693
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Personally, I am shocked at people’s posts on here. If a rebbe said something, fine you may not agree with it, but there are ways how to say that you don’t agree. These rebbeim (R’ Shlomo Heiman zatzal etc.) are people that know what they’re talking about. Give them some respect. Say it in a way that’s respectful.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011692
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Can you go to the Mall and shop at Macy’s or must you shop on 13th Ave in BP?

    Does it mean if you can ride the Subway?? Goyim ride the Subway

    See my previous post about what my rebbe said, “At the same time, you have to live. You have to be able to live and enjoy life.”

    To live- if you need to go to macy’s then go.

    I suggested museums or zoos because it’s you can walk around and look and see things. If you see something not tznius you can walk away and go somewhere else. You’re not confined to one space, as opposed to a baseball game, which you are.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011690
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    There are ways to show that you are different without making it look like you’re better than everyone else. You can respect others, and tell them that my religion doesn’t allow certain things. I would certainly not do it in a way that makes it look like you’re being rude.

    I would advise you to look into Sefer Mekadshei Shemecha, by Rabbi Shraga Freedman, available through Feldheim. I personally know the author. He researched the topic of Kiddush Hashem for 10 years and he has haskamos from Rabbis Shmuel Kamenetzky Shlita, Yitzchak Sheiner Shlita and others. This sefer talks all about the importance of making a kiddush Hashem and how to do it.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011686
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    benignuman, I agree with you on that point

    in reply to: baseball games #1011681
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    ourtorah, I do feel like I’m being attacked. I’m trying to go through each person’s comments one by one.

    My Rebbeim explained that to make a Kiddush Hashem, you have to show that the Jews are different from everyone else. If you show people that you are different and do things in a different way, then people will respect you. It sounds like you’re doing the best you can.

    If you know me, you’ll know that I’m not the type to sit in my home and do nothing because of pritzus. There are things to do. I go out and do things. I am definitely not ignorant of the fact that there’s pritzus out there. I live in an out of town community, I know what it’s all about. The way I was raised is that you should be a frum yid even where there’s tumah.

    You have banned Beaches, Waterparks , Amusement parks,Sporting Events , The Mall ..And other thingsthat werent mentioned but Im sure they are not good either

    I haven’t banned it, the Torah has banned it.

    You can go out to a park where people usually don’t go to and take a walk. You can go hiking. You can go to museums, the list is endless of what you could do.

    There’s a story of a family who went to the airport on chol hamoed to ride the train for several hours. A pilot saw them and told them, “I fly all the time but I barely ever see my family.You probably barely ever fly because you have a big family but you guys spend time together as a family. I fly, but I’m going nowhere, and you don’t fly but you’re going places.”

    old man,Makcklemore-I’m not talking about playing sports. I happen to be athletic. I’m talking about going to a game in general. I happen to like playing sports. these Roshei Yeshiva are talking about watching a game at a stadium.

    old man, an added note. I heard a shmuz from a rebbe at the current yeshiva I am in. He spoke about daas Torah and If a gadol says something, you listen. He said, “On Yeshiva World News, sometimes they have a statement from a gadol, and on the bottom, they have comments about it. People just write their comments on what the gadol said, whether it was right or wrong to say such a thing. It’s daas Torah! If a Gadol said it, then listen to him. We don’t need your comments!”

    in reply to: baseball games #1011674
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    akuperma, if your account hasn’t been hijacked, the way my rebbe explained it to me (or rather to my parents who asked him what to do as an outlet) is that yes there is pritzus out there and there are places you shouldn’t go (beaches, waterparks, amusement parks that have waterparks attached to them, etc.) But at the same time, you have to live. You have to be able to live and enjoy life.

    yes, I am aware that there are Jews who play on professional sports teams. But they’re not frum. In any case, I wasn’t talking about playing for a professional team. I was talking about going to a game in general.

    benignuman, I see that I have a typo. My last post should have been, If you’ve ever been to a baseball game, you’ll see that it’s NOT the most clean place entertainment you could possibly get.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011670
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    benignuman, I posted before I saw your post. I went to an elementary school which was mainly run by chassidim but most kids in the school were litvish. They would never go out to a baseball game. On lag b’omer, we either went to the zoo or went to the park and played baseball and had a barbecue.

    If you ever went to a baseball game, I think you would agree that it’s the most clean entertainment you could possibly get. Baseball itself is not bad, it’s the atmosphere around it that is.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011668
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    Hashkafically, football has issues. As a rebbe in a yeshiva that I attended (yes that same yeshiva) put it in a shmuz “You go to a game to watch 22 goyim beat up another 22 goyim.” (That yeshiva wasn’t against sports, they were against going to sports games.) I agree that people need breaks, but you can definitely find kosher entertainment.

    in reply to: Why Do We Jump? #1016460
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    No, it’s still part of kedusha

    in reply to: baseball games #1011666
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    akuperma, if you noticed I raised the issue of cheerleaders by football and basketball, not by baseball. There are other issues by baseball, as I mentioned. You’re right, it’s fewer issues, but if you ask your local hashkafic rabbi, you’ll realize that there are still issues. As for pritzus by baseball games, the people sitting next to you aren’t exactly dressed the way a regular bais yaakov girl would dress, to put it mildly. If it’s cold, then that takes care of that problem,. but there are other issues as well.

    in reply to: Pesach Recipes! #1012345
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    oomis, there’s a cookbook for vegans that someone made for pesach. If you want eggless recipes there might be some desserts and side dishes in there. It’s called Vegan Passover recipes and it’s written by Nancy Berkoff

    in reply to: baseball games #1011662
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    L’maaseh it’s not a kosher activity. You’re telling me yeshivish people do go. Personally, I was brought up to not go to baseball game. I went to a baseball game when I was in camp about 15 years ago. That was about it. However, it’s not a kosher activity, being with non jews like that and the people there aren’t exactly the type of people you’d want to hang around with. There are also issues with Lo Selech B’chokos Hagoy.

    zehavasdad, there are other issues besides for the ones I just mentioned when going to basketball and football games and that is that there’s definite pritzus as there are cheerleaders.

    It’s definitely not in the sppirit of Chol Hamoed. In major cities, they try to have a big attraction on Chol Hamoed so people won’t get bored.

    in reply to: Why Do We Jump? #1016458
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    The things you need to hear are the divrei shebikdusha-Kaddosh until Kevodo, Baruch Kevod until Mimkomo and Yimloch. After that (Mimkomcha, Mimkomo, etc.) you can sing

    in reply to: baseball games #1011658
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    zahavasdad, that’s unusual because most yeshivish guys that I know would never go to a game. My Rosh Yeshiva (I call him my Rosh Yeshiva even though I’m not in that yeshiva anymore) always says over from R’ Shlomo Heiman, (It’s a line in Yiddish. I’ll translate) Ein mentsh varft a pilka, noch a mentch shlept a shteckin, un fiftzig goyim shreiin Eiy! (One person throws a ball, Another person drags a stick and fifty goyim scream Eiy!)

    in reply to: baseball games #1011656
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    jack777, Boruch Hashem, you obviously never went to a baseball game or even imagined what it looks like. However, the atmosphere is definitely different than a zoo. There’s no comparison whatsoever

    in reply to: Why Do We Jump? #1016456
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    oy, now I understand.No I never heard of that before, sorry. I did hear that if you know that you won’t hear the chazzan, (like you’re in a big place and you won’t hear the chazzan say kadosh kadosh etc.) then you can just continue davening.

    in reply to: baseball games #1011653
    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    zahavasdad, your average yeshivish family doesn’t go to baseball games.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 296 total)