daniela

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  • daniela
    Participant

    Hi, in some phones you can disable wifi in the preferences, but in others, this is not possible. I assume the OP was not able to disable wifi in preferences (or perhaps only had “airplane mode”, which also disables cellphone reception).

    I personally don’t particularly like K9. In addition, Android, but also Chrome for Windows and other platforms, will connect directly to the google websites, such as gmail. I once posted a detailed discussion, but moderators deleted it. I don’t mind rewriting what I can remember, but if it’s not suitable for the website, no problem. However it is unadvisable to rely too much on K9. Actually at this point it is unreliable to rely upon any single filter.

    A smartphone is, unfortunately, a platform where the user is the product. They need to grab our personal info (you realize our phones knows which time we wake up and which time we fall asleep, whom we call and for how long, the websites we visit, even what we are thinking – we usually write that into google) and they need to push advertising and other unwanted garbage; the aim is to keep our attention focused on the device for most of our waking hours. Of course connectivity is crucial to that “business” model.

    The Android (a unix-family operating system) has a filesystem which is hierarchical. The top directory is / (it is also called the root directory) and contains both files and subdirectories. For example typical subdirectories of the directory / are /etc /bin /usr and so on. In turn those contain files and sub-subdirectories. However, in many cellular phones, one can not even see the directory structure, or in other cases, the important files are read-only and can not be modified by the user.

    Please be careful with modifications because it’s very possible that the phone will decide to access the internet anyway, except will do that on the cellular network (at your expense).

    Please let me know more precisely what you are trying to do, and if I know how, I will tell you. Are you trying to block the web browser? Are you trying to block all connectivity via wifi? Are you wishing to keep some apps connected (such as email) and block others?

    in reply to: Vaccines in the frum community #962994
    daniela
    Participant

    What people should do is stay at home when they feel unwell, as opposed to going to work and to social gatherings.

    I respectfully ask the moderator why my, I believe, articulated comment has not been approved, while proposals of forced vaccinations as well as conspiracy-theoretical anti-vaccination tirades are published immediately.

    in reply to: Vaccines in the frum community #962990
    daniela
    Participant

    GAW:

    “The problem is that there is nothing to discuss.”

    “They are “true believers”, who similar to missionaries, are not interested in hearing the truth.”

    if that is what you think a priori, and if you assume that I have never asked medical counsel or that I have seen a quack, I am sorry that I can’t help your narrow-mindedness. By the way you do not even know so far which vaccinations we declined.

    “P.S. If you don’t vaccinate your children, I’m interested to hear why not. (Also I’d like to make sure that no one in my family has any contact with you or your children).”

    “Not really. I don’t think I asked for such personal information from a complete stranger.”

    Which one of the two?

    “As I said before, Tetanus+ (TDAP?) & Polio are the biggies. MMR is also important, as those diseases can hurt pregnant women. After that, if you don’t want to take flu or Chicken pox vaccine (and certainly HPV), I have no Tayainos.”

    Those who receive Sabin Polio should be aware that live virus is present and thus avoid contact with immunodepressed people and people not (or not yet) vaccinated for a few days after each dose. I agree with you on the rest, except for your glaring omission of arguably the most important vaccine for travelers and for people in contact with travelers: yellow fever. Polio is by now very rare even in remote countryside areas in the third world: yellow fever, which is more serious than polio, is endemic even in urban areas and due to globalization can occasionally be encountered anywhere.

    Now, if you tell me you don’t ever travel outside NYC or at most you go to NJ, and that you rarely have reason to contact travelers to Asia or Africa, that is a good reason for skipping yellow fever vaccine. As you see, good reasons for declining potentially life-savings vaccinations exist. You are proof of it.

    I can not agree with the point you make with regards to herd immunity. A child or an elderly or even a young person who can not be vaccinated (due to serious diseases such as cancer, or being a transplant recipient) is a person whose health and even life are threatened even by a trivial cold, for which there is no vaccination available at present. Anyone who has any cold-like symptoms should temporarily stay away from that person.

    in reply to: Vaccines in the frum community #962975
    daniela
    Participant

    edited for inaccurate information

    Mixing together very different issues such as polio, MMR and herpes vaccination (all that spiced with comments about child abuse and MBP) and singling out “the frum community” shows quite clearly what the agenda really is.

    Gavra at work, if you wish to know about why we did and did not this or that choice in regards to vaccination, please write TYW so that they should post a verified confidentiality statement (I assume you are a medical doctor, else you have no business to know) and a disposable email address which you can read. I will be happy to respond.

    in reply to: The Cost of Being Orthodox #960375
    daniela
    Participant

    You can buy kosher food at 2am in any town which has shops open at 2am (even the pharmacy or the gas station, if it comes to that). How much more so if one avails themselves of all the leniences you accustomed us all to.

    Now, if someone wants to buy *meat* and *wine* at 2am, that is a different story. I am, however, not sure where in the Torah it is advised as necessary, or even as healthy, to do so daily or twice a day during the week. Let alone do that regularly in the middle of the night.

    Would be interesting if you posted a similar discussion “The cost of having a computer”.

    in reply to: The Cost of Being Orthodox #960362
    daniela
    Participant

    I actually misread your quote. Only when I saw DY’s post calling your figure ridiculous, did I realize you wrote 200K per year ie about 17K per month.

    in reply to: How can I get an evil Iranian deported from America? #957952
    daniela
    Participant

    A heter? is he a yid?

    Ask your question to the rabbi who is encouraging you to get the person deported.

    in reply to: I have K9 web filter and it's blocking Ebay #953315
    daniela
    Participant

    Mods why was my post deleted? As there are readers who use K9 (I think a few posters mentioned using it) it seems to me they should know its weaknesses.

    in reply to: Rabbis and the draft #951155
    daniela
    Participant

    ZD I have hardly noticed rabbis stating it is forbidden to pay taxes to the State of Israel or to other ordinary countries, perhaps you would like to quote them to us? Even in cases it was permissible to evade such taxes if possible (USSR is an example) I do not recall it being declared forbidden to pay taxes, of course, as long as we perceive that paying taxes to the evil govt is for us advantageous. Again can you please quote if someone stated differently?

    I am not sure what compulsory draft has to do with the above, though.

    in reply to: Rabbis and the draft #951152
    daniela
    Participant

    ZD obviously one in such a situation would have first to hire someone and study the laws, in order to see if it is possible to set up a non-taxable business or enterprise, second look into evading taxes if there is a good chance this is possible without being caught (we are not allowed to help authorities with their job and cause heartache to our families, different from what “rabbi” martin luther king was quoted above), third see if it is for us possible to live in poverty so that there is nothing to be taxed, fourth, leave.

    See, we have been running since many generations, we know the drill.

    in reply to: Rabbis and the draft #951150
    daniela
    Participant

    I don’t hold by “rabbi” martin luther king (sorry if someone dislikes the quotes) and halacha allows us various recourses when we are allowed (sometimes obligated) to follow Torah and disregard the law of the land. We sure don’t have to “willingly” and “lovingly” turn the other cheek, as MLK’s religion is suggesting. By the way, a law which, if obeyed to the letter, violates the beliefs of a minority has a name: “religious discrimination”.

    in reply to: Blemished People #949920
    daniela
    Participant

    Really integral? You don’t mind that there exist heavily disabled people? I am in awe of the level you have achieved.

    in reply to: Capital Punishment #951537
    daniela
    Participant

    Avi K

    I am well aware there are halachot (let me stress, halachot) in regards to people who present a danger. The last time I know these questions being non-theoretical was in Europe during WW2.

    Equating cremation of eichmann (which I have no idea if it was done seeking daas Torah, and quite frankly I doubt it) which has no negative connotation for their ideology (many nazis chose cremation for themselves in their will, and I do not recall eichmann protesting it during the trial) with desecration of human bodies which sometimes had to take place in order to safely eliminate evidence after a person had to be assassinated, with a hypotetical deliberate desecration of bodies, speaks for itself. Moreover, the assumption that such a step would scare the aspiring terrorists into becoming meek lambs and fear the might and strength of the Jews, also speaks for itself. What will realistically happen, everywhere in the world, we all know. And, sorry to break the bubble, terrorists are not exclusively motivated by their fantasies of young ladies in the afterlife. They are prepared to do what they do because they believe that is the right thing to do.

    Public safety and order, if that is the high priority of the Israeli government, should indeed be implemented, but the statistics on violent crimes and those on vicious crime, somehow tell me that if there were miracolously a peaceful solution of the Arab problem, this would not turn the country into a paradise, would it.

    Finally I am well aware of the correspondence between Rabbi Moshe Feinstein and Ronald Reagan on the subject of death penalty in USA. We do not know if nowadays Rabbi Feinstein would pasken the same way (I am sure we all remember the first death penalty trials i.e. frank coppola etc. where the legal debate was not superficial, attorneys studied the papers and the sentence was not written before the trial even started), what we do know is that at this time, multiple poskim in USA say it’s forbidden for observant Jews to be on juries when the death penalty is involved – period.

    in reply to: Blemished People #949913
    daniela
    Participant

    thegra: even though I am unable to see the connection between physical appearance and spiritual essence, I believe there is one. I do not believe physical appearance to be an incidental quality / property.

    Also, I think the situation is more complex than how you discussed. I think your example should be expanded.

    1) Yossi

    He is a Cohen and he is fit, he can duchen, but he can’t do any service in the Beit Hamikdash as there is none.

    2) Shlomo

    He is a Cohen but he has a minor blemish and is disqualified

    3) Binyamin (and Reuven, and Daniela, and John, and Bob….)

    Binyamin is a Levi, Reuven is a Yisrael, Daniela is a female, John is a convert, Bob is non jewish. They are all *forbidden* from serving in the Beit Hamikdash (I repeat: forbidden. Our problem is not that we can’t.)

    4) Shimon (and …..)

    Be them Cohanim or not, be them males or females, be them Jewish or not, we suppose they have ALS or similar. They *can not* serve in the Beit Hamikdash, they can’t even walk or talk or wash themselves. Let us think about it for a moment.

    5) Yaakov (and ….)

    These people, be them Cohanim or not, be them males or females, Yidden or goyim, have a difficult disability. They have no awareness. They can not even wonder if they would like to be the Cohen Gadol.

    None of these people serve in the Beit Hamikdash. There is no practical difference.

    Are we really bothered by the fact that #2, who looks fit enough to us to serve, is instead disqualified by Torah?

    Personally I am very bothered by the fact there exist people like #5 whose suffering is beyond human understanding and by the fact there exist people like #4 whose suffering is instead very obvious to their friends as they are aware and thanks to computers etc. can interact with everyone else. While I do not have an answer and I think no one does, I think most people who are bothered by #2, by a G-d who could have allowed the person with a small physical problem to serve (which now is theoretical, and when Moshiach will come, we may hope that blemishes will be immediately healed) — how so much more will they be bothered by #4 and #5, especially when it is an obviously innocent person who have been suffering since birth.

    Maybe Golda will prove me wrong, but that’s how I see it.

    in reply to: Capital Punishment #951532
    daniela
    Participant

    Thank you, oomis, for your flattering words, but I have not been young (much less “very young”) since a long time.

    I had already read you attribute the opinions to an Israeli cousin of yours. Two questions remain: why you decided not to challenge his position (possibly you agree with him, if it weren’t for the detail you do not believe it would be a “deterrent”? am I misunderstanding your clarification?) and why you decided to post such a statement in public, in fact, presenting it as an opinion shared by a sizeable number of Jews, including – according to you – some (unnamed) rabbis.

    Torah allows killing either in immediate self-defence or, under precise conditions which nowadays it’s questionable if they ever can be fulfilled even for nonjews, within the framework of death penalty. The person condamned to death, gentile or Jew, is executed immediately to minimize their suffering and then the body is treated with the respect which is owed to every human body. I happen to find it very strange that a Rabbi would state something against Torah. Stating that “Jews” would approve, much less suggest, desecrating human remains, sounds to me eerily similar to a blood libel, if I may say.

    You are correct however, it is not your cousin’s original idea. Large-scale desecration of deceased Muslims enemies was pioneered by mussolini and graziani in Libya and later adopted by hitler in his north african campaign. They even made sure to hang any enemies who were still alive or who were sentenced to death, before dirtying the deceased with pig’s carcasses, because according to Muslim beliefs, strangulation or hanging prevents the soul from exiting through the throat.

    in reply to: Blemished People #949899
    daniela
    Participant

    It seems to me the story you posted furthers my point: the Rabbi’s genius, again for reasons we can not fathom (I believe we are taught some Rabbis were very handsome and others were not) caused him to look ugly (at least in the eyes of vain and rude people; we surely should assume the rav’s wife found him attractive, should not we?) Also, I believe in the future world we will have a resemblance to our appearance in this world, correct me if I am wrong.

    See, the point is, we have people without eyesight, we have people without limbs, we have tetraplegics, countless diseases – we correctly say – along with Western culture – we should help them live to the fullest. To that aim, we scream against work discrimination (even though we are well aware that, say, a healthy employee’s productivity is different). We promote sports and other activities, nowadays there are many athletes among them. We even become angry at words such as “blind” or even “disabled”, we mandate words to define them and enforce that with laws and with social stigma. However the main point remains: no one wishes upon ourselves and our children to be like that. While we can (and should) try to support every human being – disabled or not – to live to the fullest and to fulfill their wishes, the fact remains that they are different and we don’t know why and we can’t help it. This is the real, serious problem. We can say, I do not know why. Or we can try to rationalize, although I have the impression that the very few persons who are at such a high level they’re able to, do not discuss this with unlearned people.

    in reply to: Brand Names�Wasting Money #948673
    daniela
    Participant

    DaasYochid I do not perceive a difference. People buy certain goods paying handsome money if they are convinced the goods are worth the price. It does not matter if their returns are in the form of financial gain, perceived satisfaction, higher social standing, valuable business connections, or something else. Of course if we buy machinery for a workshop we can expect the balance to be tilted very differently from (even the same person) buying a lady’s handbag, but all those elements coexist to a point in every purchase.

    in reply to: Blemished People #949894
    daniela
    Participant

    I do not think it is possible to avoid confronting the fact halacha focuses on the external, which we thus learn it’s indeed an intrinsec and essential property and not simply an outward cover or a screen which hides reality. Lehavdil in other religions they have debates which in Judaism would not even make sense. Most Western thinkers and philosophers, despite tremendous diversity, debates and disagreements, share that outlook, and it seems to me this is true for contemporary works all the way to the Greeks and Romans, and I have found it hard to explain to others, because it’s very much taken for granted in western culture.

    in reply to: Capital Punishment #951530
    daniela
    Participant

    Hi oomis

    I wonder if you have ever considered what would be the consequences for Jews worldwide (especially in Muslim countries, but also in Western countries with strong Arab or Muslim minorities) should your misguided plan be implemented. Or is that an intended consequence of your plan, to make life impossible for Jews outside the Medinat?

    I would also like to ask what you propose to do, when it comes to the consequences for the Medinat itself, given that we can expect the Arab citizens, the PA citizens, and the citizens of the neighbouring countries will “react” to your proposal. Are you going to demand that, after having been kicked out by the countries we lived in for centuries (and losing whatever belongings we have there) we “donate” our children’s life to the IDF so that they may R”L suffer a futile death?

    Finally, given that your proposal is unlikely to pass unnoticed in the international community, I wonder if you would be delighted in the event R”L the hospital and police services of countries worldwide would deliberately make sure that Jews who are determined (by their legal systems) to be guilty of something and die in custody, should suffer autopsies and afterwards be cremated.

    Thank you for clarifying for all readers the difference between Torah and Zionism. That is the same difference between Zaka respectfully washing and recomposing every deceased, including the terrorists, and the proposal you stated.

    in reply to: Blemished People #949887
    daniela
    Participant

    A few days ago you posted about your students (or you?) being bothered by a supposedly “demeaning” statement. In that topic I suggested the question is deeper than any simplistic answer. For reasons beyond human understanding there exist males and there exist females, there exist jewish people and non jewish people, fit people and blemished people, poor people and rich people, people who have many children and people who can’t conceive, and so on and so forth.

    I hope you can reconcile with that. However I can’t accept you saying about Torah that R”L “it does not seem Jewish”.

    daniela
    Participant

    Hi, of course you can. You have to change the settings of the wifi antenna – just make sure you have a copy of the settings in case you need in the future. If it’s a recent smartphone you have do it for both 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz bands. Please go to system/etc/wifi and have a look what’s there, such as nvram_mfg.txt and nvram_net.txt (the exact details depend on what device you have and what android version) That’s where the parameters are, rx and tx power, frequency etc. You can change them or as someone else suggested, rename the files or the whole folder.

    I advise after doing that, you manually disable wifi in the phone preferences, because some terminals might attempt anyway to find a lock to the signal and waste battery power.

    in reply to: In defense of correct spelling… #947798
    daniela
    Participant

    – Hello, am I speaking to Intelligence Service?

    – ….eeerrr……….. uhhh?

    in reply to: Trolling Wikipedia #1048101
    daniela
    Participant

    LOL It took me a few minutes to stop laughing…..

    in reply to: Weird, but I don't know if this has any halachic implication #1146955
    daniela
    Participant

    Thank you to both, I thought so, somehow I misunderstood ubiquitin’s post the first time I read it, my apologies.

    in reply to: Weird, but I don't know if this has any halachic implication #1146949
    daniela
    Participant

    Thank you a lot ubiquitin and Sam2.

    If the cow is shechted and found treif, then can it still be mevatel by intentionally mixing it?

    I maybe used the wrong word “worse”, I meant to say that standard tests and chemical analysis is a good method for detecting blood (actually I think there is a max concentration allowed for that), I think it is not as good in detecting a mixture of milks from different species, especially if the nonkosher animal’s milk is not extracted mechanically and there are few cells and few species-specifics bacteria in the milk (yet perhaps it’s good enough, say, could a 1% threshold be detected? I am not sure about it), but in regards to finding traifa milk it seems to me it’s useless.

    in reply to: Weird, but I don't know if this has any halachic implication #1146944
    daniela
    Participant

    Thank you a lot ubiquitin. Thus the treifa mixing is actually even worse than mixing with camel’s milk or blood, if I understand correctly. Not to mention that the latter are a remote possibility and very likely less than 1/60, while not so the treifa. I have heard many or most cows have the procedure at some point. Perhaps there is a majority of kosher cows in industrial farming, but it is not obviously nor overwhelmingly so.

    in reply to: Weird, but I don't know if this has any halachic implication #1146941
    daniela
    Participant

    Ubiquitin, Benignuman, correct me if I am wrong but I believe that a kosher liquid mixed with a nonkosher liquid has a much less stringent rule than the nonkosher unwanted taste being nullified in 60. I believe it is 1/6. Also, I believe I heard we do not have to worry that perhaps our particular container that we bought in the store, is nonkosher due to unfortunate coincidences which caused it to have a percentage of the nonkosher liquid larger than 1/6 (thus no bitul): given that the milk for sale is intended to be mixed at the processing plant e.g. for pasteurization, as long as the majority of USDA milk is kosher enough, we do not have to worry about a specific container. Again please correct me if I am wrong.

    Many cows get their stomach punctured, it is a routine practice, but there is a high turnover of milking cows and young cows have not yet needed the procedure.

    in reply to: Weird, but I don't know if this has any halachic implication #1146938
    daniela
    Participant

    Milk from a kosher animal which has treif status is no less a transgression than pig’s, horse’s or camel’s milk, and USDA is totally uninterested in the presence, abundance, or even totality of milk from such a cow in the carton we buy. Of course under proper conditions it is nullified – so is pig’s milk, so is blood – and of course halachot bitul are very serious stuff and denying them is apikores, and in addition there are other leniencies, such as relying on the majority. This does not mean people should make light of those who point out problems, especially given that, as others pointed out, there are so many CY products available.

    in reply to: Obama is crying because his gun law didn't get passed #947956
    daniela
    Participant

    I can’t understand. Does anybody think that requiring mandatory background checks and other common-sense regulations will increase the number of victims? I don’t think anyone can argue that. No one is stating this is the perfect solution to all problems, this is obvious. But, will it prevent some murders? Possibly only a few events, or some victims in the same mass event? I think it’s very hard to deny it will prevent some murders, especially given the worldwide statistics, and we all have seen how much of a dissuasion is the simple fact of making it complicated (e.g. smoking laws) even when something is totally legal.

    Since we can’t do everything, should we give up and do nothing? What about medicine? Since we can’t help the fact that everyone eventually dies, should we shut down hospitals, doctor’s offices, and medical schools? Or should we do what we can and after that, try harder at it and try to improve even a little bit?

    in reply to: Weird, but I don't know if this has any halachic implication #1146912
    daniela
    Participant

    “100% USDA Grade A milk is not permitted to contain anything other than cow’s milk.”

    If you are telling us that we should not be concerned because we do not want or like horse milk or treifa milk and that if there were any, it is bitul, and even if we were to buy a carton where it’s not nullified, we acted correctly by buying USDA certified milk and it has a presumption of being kosher and we go by the majority since the very vast majority of cartons are fine, I agree with you. I do not agree on your remark of lashon hara / motzi shem ra — which, however, you do not qualify as slander, thus it appears you too think there is truth to it.

    in reply to: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 3:8 #947764
    daniela
    Participant

    Thank you T613T and I am glad the answers satisfied her.

    in reply to: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 3:8 #947762
    daniela
    Participant

    Of course we know why she is asking you. She did not ask you why some details of a neurosurgery are not performed in a different way, nor did she ask you about altering the definition for a topological manifold, because (1) she is well aware she does not master either topic and would make a fool of herself (and a secular teacher would *not* react nicely – which I do not advocate, I am merely stating a fact) and (2) this is not the whole story, as she has understood all there is to understand: a woman should not pass between two men and a man should not pass between two women. She is not asking you a halachic question (such as how distant may two woman be, to be permissible for man to walk between them), she is asking you why the Torah counterposes two women and two pigs. There is no answer to that which will satisfy her. It is my opinion that the more you try to answer, the more you will fuel her misplaced feelings of being demeaned. I actually wonder if it is the quote who bothers her, or viceversa if she is bothered and seeks quotes to rationalize why she is bothered. Are you bothered by this quote? I am not. If there’s a large sign at the border “animals and diamonds must be declared at customs” I think everyone, even a fool, will figure out the obvious, the animals are subject to health checks, the diamonds to taxation. No one will think we are entering a country that does not value diamonds! Most important, someone who is bothered by this quote is likely to be bothered by plenty of other quotes in the Torah. In such a situation I think only extreme honesty and sincerity on both sides can help.

    in reply to: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 3:8 #947760
    daniela
    Participant

    That’s precisely the point, in my humble opinion. I do not think the young lady’s familiarity with Shas is too great, and I also notice that she is asking a woman, she did not ask her father / brothers / Rabbi (or she asked and they did not answer; possibly there is a reason for that). I think you might tell her you asked and were given this answer (print it out): if she understand it, awesome, she will have her answer (BTW thanks Popa for sharing this beautiful insight). If, as I suspect, she can’t, she will be forced to reach the correct conclusion, ie that she is ignorant – and that’s the very reason she asked the original question. Yet, if the question was sincere, she will go to her father or brother or Rabbi and ask them to please explain what does it mean, admitting that the various cases when the halacha is according to Rabbi Abaye and someone who lost hope about a lost object and a mumar etc. don’t seem to her to have a relation with her question, and will ask them to please explain why is this supposed to be an answer to a question of hers – which she will respectfully state. In the event the question was insincere, now it is her problem, you have quoted her from the Talmud, which to a woman is unusual and yet you promptly did, and there is nothing more she can ask for.

    If you are her teacher, I find her statement you quote “As a ‘feminist’ I believe it is the men’s sacred duty to look up interesting Midrashim, meforshim and halachos for me, answer all my random hashkafic questions, and tell fascinating Divrei Torah. In return, I have to keep tznius.” if that is quoted correctly, quite disrespectful and not the proper way to address anyone, let alone a teacher.

    in reply to: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 3:8 #947746
    daniela
    Participant

    I am not sure why you can’t show her the answer of Popa.

    Given that not even that answer seem to you it will convince her, I do not think you should answer because I do not think you can provide her with a satisfactory answer (an answer she will find satisfactory). If she is bothered, we are entitled to have feelings (are we not all bothered, say, by innocent suffering? personally, that bothers me much more than hearing shelo asani eisha). I think you should tell her that we don’t understand everything.

    Are you her teacher?

    in reply to: Kosher Email #946365
    daniela
    Participant

    Yes, adblocking plugins should also work (we have to download a plugin for every browser we use). They all have basic blocking lists and in addition it’s possible to block any unwanted content for future navigation.

    in reply to: Kosher Email #946363
    daniela
    Participant

    I never had a yahoo mail account and I had no idea it is problematic. I assume those who say so are referring to webmail and free accounts and (questionable) advertising. Which anyway one can deal with. Most unwanted garbage (ie the sort that arrives on the screen without a user looking for it) is removed by using a hosts file, such as mvps (you can google mvps hosts).

    Perhaps we all should realize that jumping to conclusions does not necessarily bring us to the correct conclusions. Even though k9 is quite good (but requires powerful hardware and is not very suitable for budget machines) it has false positives, even in categories that one would think are well-defined. Monitoring software can have false positives as well: an example? Someone beyond suspicion had in their log a connection to a well-known website we do not use (I do not mean FB or twitter or yahoo). Turns out someone had ran on the machine a utility for choosing a fast DNS. That utility measures the times it takes for various public DNSs to resolve a list of “most frequently used websites”, including some of those we don’t use. To do so, of course, it connects to the domain name.

    in reply to: No more college? #947201
    daniela
    Participant

    let’s not feed the troll….. oh wait, it’s too much fun to resist. Dear troll, if you are convinced it works, please by all means feel free to lie on your resume, I am not going to stop you.

    in reply to: PHOTO: Orthodox Jewish Man Covers Himself In Plastic Bag On Plane #945895
    daniela
    Participant

    Making Halachah look like a joke or like a yoke?

    I have not been hired to eliminate foolish behaviour in public among those who are (or claim to be) observant Jews, and cause people to make a mockery of Judaism and Torah, but actually I would support that. It might not be a bad idea if some people were in charge of that: a good-manners and common-sense police. Say, they could start with silencing those on the trucks who chant Na Na. Ohhh but that’s not politically correct, we must not hurt the delicate sensitivity of our Baalei Teshuva brothers. Wait, is the man in the picture not a Baal Teshuva as well? See, as I said all along. Only a certain (very specific) sort of people are suitable targets for nastiness, everyone else can do whatever they see fit and no one objects.

    PS I wish some of the effort expended in attempting to ridicule the person in the photo had been diverted towards real and serious problems such as the burka ladies.

    in reply to: PHOTO: Orthodox Jewish Man Covers Himself In Plastic Bag On Plane #945883
    daniela
    Participant

    I don’t think a bus is comparable to this discussion. If the bus drives over a road, or even a dirt road and the like, that means there is no recognizable cemetery and tombs. I recall there is some park in NYC where we have documentation that a Jewish cemetery existed and if I recall correctly, we are also aware that construction did not take place after proper removal and reinterrment in another area. Someone told me Cohanim are not prohibited to walk there. But in this case it’s impossible to rely on any sort of doubts.

    in reply to: PHOTO: Orthodox Jewish Man Covers Himself In Plastic Bag On Plane #945862
    daniela
    Participant

    It is interesting that the photo is about 10 years old, in those days there was the 2nd intifada and disruption to air traffic. Cyprus air space and Larnaca airport were highly overcrowded as well (stopover and refueling for foreign airlines that still flied to TLV were moved there) which had a domino effect in addition to the route modifications for security reasons.

    My guess is that there is no problem elsewhere, because there are not that many Jewish cemeteries which are close to approach corridors, El Al probably avoids them as policy, and in the very rare case an observant Cohen is flying another airline at an airport where this is a concern (some mentioned La Guardia, which sounds possible) he will ask before check-in. Personnel are helpful with these issues, why shouldn’t they be helpful to a paying customer? Ground desk is there to help passengers give away more money to the airline, why should they not assist him and if requested, reschedule him, no matter how wierd his reasons?

    I would think possibly this passenger did not think of the problem (a problem likely connected to disruption in Israeli airspace which was a constant of 2002-2003) and boarded the flight, realizing the problem after takeoff, maybe while looking at the flight route on the entertainment screen. At that point perhaps he did not know what to do and may have asked staff in the cabin, and the cockpit called the ground on his behalf, relayed the answer to the passenger, and bagged himself he got.

    Those of us who fly regularly see all sort of wierd people doing wierd things, so many of them that wierdness hardly gets noticed. What I deduce from this fact, is that the world is huge and populated by many different people with different outlooks. What others deduce is that everyone has a right to be themselves, except for the “ghetto jews” who give a bad name to (insert here whatever you prefer). I can’t accept this. Did he made himself ridiculous? I don’t think he did, but – whatever – people are welcome to think so, if they must. Did he make someone else ridiculous? Someone else! Seems to me that statement is ridiculous, actually, too ridiculous to be debated.

    in reply to: PHOTO: Orthodox Jewish Man Covers Himself In Plastic Bag On Plane #945822
    daniela
    Participant

    ah, so it’s a public relations issue. I wonder if you people feel embarrassed that the Torah commands us something you find absurd (“what’s with this difficult concept of tuma, anyway”). If so, please by all means do whatever you see fit, the world is wide and there’s all sort of people including the frei, the reforms etc, just please don’t mislead others by falsely suggesting it is a “stringency”.

    in reply to: PHOTO: Orthodox Jewish Man Covers Himself In Plastic Bag On Plane #945818
    daniela
    Participant

    It is not about being machmir. It is a leniency and a big one.

    To those who make jokes about the moon: perhaps you are unaware there are already lunar cemeteries, and a Jew is there. His name is Gene Shoemaker. You can look it up.

    in reply to: PHOTO: Orthodox Jewish Man Covers Himself In Plastic Bag On Plane #945817
    daniela
    Participant

    YYtz you seem oblivious to the fact that this IS the leniency a genial posek came up with. A huge leniency that not everyone accepts, and which incidentally I believe to be valid only for pressurized aircrafts. On top of that you and other posters are trying to paint us as fools via reductio ad absurdum. Tumah is definitely a problem for cohanim at “thousands of feets” or a few hundred meters. It is not a problem at jets’ cruise altitude, on spacecrafts, or with the moon.

    True, I take everything you write with many grains of salt. I don’t mind if you eat macrobiotic, this is a personal preference. I have issues about people advising (a very young person) before thinking twice. Some speak very well about that place and some others did not enjoy it (to use an euphemism); it is a controversial place for a girl or woman to be, and one should at least recommend to hear many opinions.

    in reply to: Contest: How Long Can You Go Without Chometz? #944704
    daniela
    Participant

    achosid: sorry for late reply, I was not on the CR for a few days. Thank you a lot, I had no clue. I was aware one can do a melacha if necessary (such as ripping leaves from herbs if one does not have any spices) but I was under the impression that if we have wine available, we don’t go and buy beer. Of course for a woman it’s unusual to do at all, so most of us are ignorant. I’ll make sure the topic is brought up on motzei shabbat, so that everyone will listen, including the girls and ladies. Thanks again.

    in reply to: Getting a Doula for Childbirth #944778
    daniela
    Participant

    I can’t believe what I read in this thread. The dr recommends what is in his best interest and bad for you? because he is lazy? That must be why he graduated medical school, he was too lazy to drop out. And what about “doctors and nurses are busy”, yeah guess what! Are busy assisting us! Integral I thought you said you are 14yr old, I am curious about your knowledge about labour and childbirth, can’t help wondering where does it come from.

    Dear OP, use that money for a cleaning lady, take-away restaurants meals, and some nice gifts to your wife, after she has given birth and left the hospital.

    daniela
    Participant

    Oh!

    BDE, he is very much missed already. What tragedy at such young age. May we only share good news.

    in reply to: PHOTO: Orthodox Jewish Man Covers Himself In Plastic Bag On Plane #945809
    daniela
    Participant

    I think the bag had no hole. Also, flight attendants can help witn hermetically sealing (they have those devices that melt plastic and that some of us have in the kitchen). One can stay in such a sealed bag without much discomfort, let alone danger, for a good amount of minutes, well over the 2-3 minutes I am told they do. Someone I know saw that about ten years ago. I wonder if it’s unusual that Israeli air traffic routes a plane over the cemetery.

    yytz is that what they teach in the organic macrobiotic community? That tumah is nullified in 60? Please, share with us the name of the person who suggested such a “brilliant” solution, is he the one you have already repeatedly mentioned here?

    in reply to: Visually impaired 12 year old #944542
    daniela
    Participant

    When is it going to be? Still during the Omer? I was thinking about an iPod with music. Perhaps an iPod touch which is quite versatile and yet is pocket-sized.

    in reply to: How to tell the Shadchan that the girl's too heavy #946223
    daniela
    Participant

    What about “I don’t think we are meant for each other”?

    in reply to: PHOTO: Orthodox Jewish Man Covers Himself In Plastic Bag On Plane #945788
    daniela
    Participant

    I think zahavasdad et al. are correct and the same thing is written on a kikar shabat article, that the passenger being a Cohen is the reason, the plane route was above Gush Dan cemetery, and that Rabbi Elyashiv paskened the plastic bag is OK. You can look up the article on kikarhashabat.

    I heard that problems with cemeteries depend on the height and I recall being told it is a possible problem only with hot-air balloons and other low altitude sports, or, for commercial flights, only close to takeoff and landing, which looks like was the case here.

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