EY Mom

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  • EY Mom
    Participant

    Doomsday, the catch is in the “among reported cases” phrase. They didn’t put that in for no reason. Unlike today, when anyone who suspects his child has measles will go straight to the pediatrician’s office, then not everyone went to the doctor. They kept their kids as comfortable as possible and hoped for the best. I would also imagine that in that scenario, if a kid came down with pneumonia as a result of the measles and ch”v died, the cause of death would be listed as pneumonia – not measles. Same for encephalitis.

    As for concern, of course people were concerned. There just wasn’t much they could do about it before vaccines came along. Same for tuberculosis and mumps. And cut fingers before penicillin. You did what you could and hoped you’d be on the bright side of the statistics.

    And your car example doesn’t work. The world is very concerned about car accidents. That’s why we have so many road safety rules: Because the road is a very dangerous place and we have to do whatever we can to keep it as safe as possible. Neither you nor any of us on this thread (I would assume) ever lived in a world where measles, mumps, rubella, smallpox, polio etc. were a fact of life. If you had, you might feel differently about vaccines.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Doomsday
    1) “It is extremely rare for a child in USA or other first world country to die from
    Measles, Chicken Pox, Roto Virus, Rubella or Whooping Cough.” Of course it is. Because in first world countries, most kids get vaccines. This whole vaccine thing blew up now because someone in EY went to Russia and brought the measles back with them. And yes, children did die from measles (one was niftar a couple of months ago in Yerushalayim r”l). But the at-risk population is not only children. Pregnant women who caught measles often miscarried or went into early labor, and those who caught rubella in the first trimester either miscarried, had stillborn babies, or had babies with severe birth defects in all but 10% of cases.

    2) Why do you keep harping on that one study? You know what? Let’s say for argument’s sake that it was falsified. So what? It’s not the only study that debunked the myth of vaccines causing autism. What about the rest of them?

    3) I still don’t get why you won’t name your sources. What do you care if they get attacked? And what is a “PhD scientist?” That tells me nothing at all. You can get a doctorate in just about anything.

    4) Truth – give me a break. The CDC doesn’t “put” anyone on a quack watch list. And yes, most of the people on these lists who are associated with the anti-vaxx movement were quacks before they got on the anti-vaxx train.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    “EY, I don’t give sources because Pro-Vaxxers attack the Source instead of the FACTS.”
    So what? If you feel the sources are legit, why don’t you give them?

    Besides, isn’t that what the anti-vaxxers do, too? 2scents or whoever gives sources, and the other side says, “those don’t count because the CDC or whoever did the study is on the payroll of the vaccine companies and the results are fraudulent. And even if the results can’t be proven to be fraudulent, they shouldn’t be counted because the CDC is getting billions from the drug companies, so they results aren’t credible no matter what.”

    What can I tell you, to me the CDC still has more credibility than people on quack watch lists.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Doomsday – you are quoting one study. That’s not enough. One falsified study – if it was falsified, and there are plenty who demonstrate that it was not – isn’t enough to discredit every other study.

    As for life expectancy, yes, Shimon got his numbers a bit wrong. The average life expectancy in 1940 was 60. The infant mortality rate was 47 for every 1,000 births.
    Still, any way you slice it, average life expectancy today is way higher and both the infant and child mortality rates today are way lower than they were back then.

    Truthishidden, thank you for the compliment. The thing is…I have done my research. Again, I never weighed in on the actual vaccination issue here – i.e., should vaccines be mandated. I’m keeping my opinion to myself on that. The only thing I’ve been hammering at here is the credibility issue of the evidence being brought here in the CR.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Doomsday, you’re not giving any sources. You’re just quoting. Who are the scientists who have disproved the CDC studies? Whoever 2scents is, they’re quoting source upon source. What are your sources?

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Truthishidden:
    I would love to hear which vaccine studies have been proven to be dishonest, how they were proven, by whom, when and what percentage of all vaccine studies the dishonest ones represent.
    Ditto for the SIDs study.
    Really. I would. I am open to hearing other opinions, but not from conspiracy theorists and pseudo-scientists.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Because he’s a one-man show, that’s why. No one credible who is not associated with a conspiracy theory movement has ever backed up his studies.
    He’s a “medical research journalist” – whatever that means – with an agenda. Look him up in American Loons, Quackwatch, etc. and you’ll find him. You don’t see names of real researchers there. The studies he quotes have all been discredited, and by more than one person or organization.
    Also, while it’s true that some of the studies done on vaccines have been either done or paid for by individuals or organizations with conflicts of interest, the exact same thing can be said for Miller. So he’s just not someone who can be used to disprove repeated studies showing that vaccines do not cause autism, SIDS, etc.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Doomsday, at least lately, you’ve quoted studies, meaning, you’ve copied and pasted quotes from studies, but haven’t cited who conducted the studies, when, why and how. If they’ve all been lifted from Neil Z. Miller, then I’m sorry but they don’t prove anything.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Doomsday, could you please explain this paragraph you wrote? I read it three times and I still can’t figure out what you’re trying to say:
    “What the RESULTS of the study OMITS – is that the MMR was replaced with THREE OTHER Vaccines – and THAT is why Autism went. So NO PROOF that MMR does not cause Autism. FAKE STUDY!”

    And okay, let’s say for argument’s sake that this one study was faulty, fraudulent, whatever. There are a huge number of other studies that came to the same conclusion. What about those?
    The point is this: Whether or not every single study that comes to the conclusion that autism, SIDS, etc. are not caused by vaccines were all done by lying, cheating people with an agenda, you still can’t disprove them by bringing studies done by other people…with an agenda, especially when they’ve been more or less proven to be conspiracy theorists with little to no qualifications to be doing the research they say they’re doing.

    And please don’t bring the fight against smoking to prove your point. The dangers of smoking were proven by the very medical establishment and government health agencies you now say are lying about vaccines, and the top was blown off the issue by a whistleblower who worked inside the tobacco industry and was able to bring solid proof from within that the manufacturers knew about the dangers of smoking and were covering it up.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Sorry, RebYidd23. Sometimes facetiousness gets missed in typing. My deepest apologies. And no, I’m not being facetious.
    Doomsday, so you’re saying that vaccines totally cause peanut allergies, but the reason they haven’t done so in Israel is because toddlers eat Bamba? In other words, one of the reasons it’s dangerous to inoculate babies from the time they’re one month old is because that can cause peanut allergies, but Israeli kids aren’t being affected by the peanut-allergy-inducing vaccines they’re getting from the time they’re infants because at a year or so they start eating Bamba?
    Boy, if only Osem knew what a product they had…

    EY Mom
    Participant

    RebYidd23, I think you missed my point – or maybe I didn’t state it clearly. Either way, my point was totally not that vaccines prevent allergies. I never heard of such a thing. My point was that, if Doomsday is bringing the recent uptick in the prevalence of peanut allergies in America as proof that vaccines are causing allergies, then how does she (I think she, please correct me if I’m wrong) explain the lack of nut allergies in EY when the kids are getting the same vaccines?
    And if Bamba is the answer, then vaccines aren’t what’s causing the problem. I mean, Bamba’s great and all, but if vaccines were the cause of allergies I’d be hard-pressed to believe Bamba could counteract them…

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Doomsday, this is exactly what I meant by a coherent argument. If you’re not advocating smacking but just want to say that lack of discipline might be behind some cases of ADHD, then don’t….advocate smacking.
    As for the rest (allergies, etc.), if you want to say that all these things are caused by vaccines then you have to rule out anything else that might be causing them: pollutants, more chemicals and artificial ingredients in food, everything. If you haven’t, then you can’t say they are being caused by vaccines.
    And I DID (sorry for the caps, don’t know how to do italics) say that ADHD, learning disabilities, etc. are increasing. The question is why. You say it’s vaccines. I say it’s awareness. The more aware you of a problem, the more you will see it.
    You mentioned peanuts. I’m definitely old enough to remember when peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were the standard American lunch fare. But to say that vaccines are causing peanut allergies? I live in EY. All of my children, as well as all their friends, get all their vaccines. The percentage of nut allergies here? Miniscule. Why?
    Again, I am not weighing in on the vaccine debate. I am weighing in on the cogency of your argument. If you are going to have any hope of convincing anyone, you are going to have to do a lot better than Neil Z. Miller, sorry.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Doomsday, I’m sorry, but your arguments are seriously incoherent.
    ADHD isn’t determined by teachers or rebbeim. An ADHD diagnosis can only be made by a competent mental health professional. Teachers and rebbeim can refer students who they think may be presenting with ADHD symptoms, but that’s it. It’s not something “fake” or “real.” Anyone who has dealt with a child – or an adult family member, for that matter – with ADHD knows it’s real.
    And are you really, seriously advocating smacking in the classroom? Forget modern psychology, gedolei Yisroel have come out against it for a host of reasons.
    I will say it one more time: ADHD and learning disabilities grow because we are more aware of them. ADHD was only acknowledged and classified about 50 years ago. The proliferation of methods to deal with learning disabilities just means more kids are acknowledged as having them and are being helped. As for asthma, allergies, etc. – do you seriously believe that ALL these are being caused by vaccines? That makes no logical sense whatsoever and does no service to your argument.
    Mind you, I’m not weighing in on the vaccine debate. But the arguments you’re advancing in support of your position are seriously lacking in coherence and in logic.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    I am not going to discuss vaccines but doomsday, please do give us a break on the ADHD, learning disabilities, SIDS, autism et al…
    There was just as much ADHD then, just that it was only in the late 1960s that it was given that name and classified as a mental disorder. Learning disabilities were also far less likely to be identified and kids who had them were just called dumb. SIDS has gone down since mothers have been told to put babies to sleep on their stomachs and remove bumpers, stuffed animals, etc.
    Autism, when diagnosed at a later age, can almost always be detected in hindsight. Many children on the autistic spectrum are able to compensate for a while, but eventually the brain simply can’t keep up anymore. Also, Asperbergs is now considered autism (for better or for worse), which complicates any study of autism from that point on.

    in reply to: Dating someone whose parents are divorced #1050013
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Having come from a family with divorced parents, I have this to say:

    In my opinion, it is very important to find out if the prospective shidduch has another role model for a healthy relationship. If they are close to a mentor, i.e. a rav/maggid shiur/mechaneches etc. to the point where they spend time in the other home and have seen – not just learned about – what a healthy, beautiful relationship looks like, and that’s what they’re striving for, then I would feel much more relaxed.

    If, on the other hand, they don’t have that kind of a relationship with anyone then while I wouldn’t say you should reject the idea out of hand, I would suggest having an open discussion about the subject, in addition to checking very carefully into the person’s middos and behavior patterns.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Now for the #1 thing your sister should bring:

    A positive attitude!

    #1 thing she should leave behind:

    The weird expectation some Americans seem to have that things in Eretz Yisrael are supposed to be the way they are in the U.S.

    EY Mom
    Participant

    While shopping613 is right about the makeup (it is very expensive here), it is not advised to bring shampoo and conditioner.

    You can buy good brands like Head and Shoulders, Pantene and others here – even though they are more expensive, it is worth it because they are formulated for hard water, unlike the stuff from the States.

    As far as cream cheese – I have no idea where shopping613 is, but buying American-style cream cheese is no problem here – either stop in at a Brunch Bagel, or go to a supermarket that sells cheese by the weight – it’s called gevinat shamenet.

    Clothing is more expensive here, although I disagree about the online orders – I and lots of Americans I know buy very good quality clothing here, you just need to know where to shop!

    EY Mom
    Participant

    Vogue, have you tried the Agudah or OU? Both offer career counseling, as far as I know. I think Young Israel might have something, also.

    Do you have contacts in NY who could help you get at least enough job leads that it would be worth doing a pilot trip? Maybe friens from seminary? There are definitely a lot more options there – both in terms of jobs and of community – than it seems there are in your location. You might also be able to find a family who would give you room and board in exchange for household help and/or help with the kids.

    I wish I could help you with more specifics. May Hashem send you brachah and hatzlachah in everything you do!

    in reply to: Ten things your teenage babysitter wishes you knew #1098604
    EY Mom
    Participant

    To all babysitters and parents of them as well, a piece of advice:

    Stipulate beforehand that you only babysit/let your daughter babysit on condition that the parents either come home together or the mother comes home first. This is the only condition under which I let my teenage daughter babysit – even for close friends. I always say it and not once did anyone ever have a problem with it.

    This cannot be stressed enough! Unfortunately, in this stage of galus, there have been too many incidents. Do NOT let your daughters babysit if the father is coming home without his wife.

    I also instruct my daughter that if that happens despite our stipulation, she is to call me immediately and remain on the phone until she leaves. And yes, my daughter is very innocent – I simply told her that it’s not tzniusdig otherwise and she accepted it.

    in reply to: The Dov Lipman Response—Controversial? #955385
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Health:

    My point about the math is that not only is this stand hypocritical – the Arabs can teach what they want and still get money but the chareidim can’t – it is also a farce.

    Lipman, Lapid et al have mentioned over and over again that chareidim are not taught basic math. That is a lie, and they know it.

    in reply to: The Dov Lipman Response—Controversial? #955371
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Two things:

    Number one, can someone please show me one chareidi school that doesn’t teach basic math? I have lived here for almost 20 years and have not come across one.

    Number two, can someone please tell me – if Yesh Atid et al do not have an agenda, how come Arab schools get to teach whatever they want and still keep their funding, but chareidi schools can’t?

    in reply to: Rabbis and the draft #951158
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Zdad and others who maintain the stance that “you live in a country, you have to abide by its laws”:

    You are forgetting one crucial thing:

    The original law of the State of Israel, the one signed by its founding father David Ben Gurion, states among other things that those who are in full-time learning are entitled to a deferment (if not an exemption, I don’t remember which) from army service. This “Status Quo Agreement” was signed on and agreed to by Ben Gurion and Agudas Yisroel, and it was against the backdrop of this document that the Declaration of Independence was drafted and signed 11 months later.

    In the current brouhaha over “sharing the burden”, it is the secular – not the chareidim – who have shown disregard for the laws of the State of Israel by declaring “unconstitutional” the only document Israel ever had that remotely resembled a constitution.

    If there is anyone showing unwillingness to abide by the laws of the country they live in, it is those who are demanding that yeshiva students be drafted, not those who are demanding that they be granted deferments.

    in reply to: Rabbis and the draft #951157
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Zdad and others who maintain the stance that “you live in a country, you have to abide by its laws”:

    You are forgetting one crucial thing:

    The original law of the State of Israel, the one signed by its founding father David Ben Gurion, states among other things that those who are in full-time learning are entitled to a deferment (if not an exemption, I don’t remember which) from army service. This “Status Quo Agreement” was signed on and agreed to by Ben Gurion and Agudas Yisroel, and it was against the backdrop of this document that the Declaration of Independence was drafted and signed 11 months later.

    In the current brouhaha over “sharing the burden”, it is the secular – not the chareidim – who have shown disregard for the laws of the State of Israel by declaring “unconstitutional” the only document Israel ever had that remotely resembled a constitution.

    If there is anyone showing unwillingness to abide by the laws of the country they live in, it is those who are demanding that yeshiva students be drafted, not those who are demanding that they be granted deferments.

    in reply to: Favorite Yiddish songs #969549
    EY Mom
    Participant

    A Yiddele by Isaac Honig is unbelievable.

    Other favorites: Kol Zman by L’Chaim Productions, Oisgetzoigen by Yonoson Schwartz.

    Actually, all of Yonoson Schwartz and L’Chaim Productions (R’ Yosef Moishe Kahane) have great songs.

    in reply to: Challah Making Appliances #949829
    EY Mom
    Participant

    I’ve never used the Magic Mill, but I have the Bosch for years and am very happy with it. I bake challah every week with 2+ kilo of flour which is about 5 pounds. If you do get it, definitely buy the stainless steel bowl. It’s also really good for big batches of cookie dough. I don’t use it for smaller batches or for cakes, though, so I can’t tell you how it performs for the lighter stuff.

    in reply to: Big Choco Chip Cookie Recipe #931030
    EY Mom
    Participant

    ThePurpleOne – no, don’t make coffee! THe cookies will be liquidy. If you have coffee/espresso powder, use that, if not then grind coffee granules so that they are powdery. A freilichen Purim!

    in reply to: Mitzvah Tantz? #1208096
    EY Mom
    Participant

    TheFrumGuy – generally speaking, only close family remain for the mitzvah tantz, that’s no stirah to the mechitzah the rest of the time. Furthermore, in many communities, the kallah’s face is covered.

    The source of the minhag is in the Machzor Vitri. But today, for all intents and purposes, it is a chassidish custom.

    Gamanit, some families have the chosson and kallah with a gartel as well, although they usually fold it up so it is shorter.

    OP – this is not a NY thing. Come to EY and you will see it, too. The chosson and kallah do not really dance; either they sway a bit from side to side or walk around in a circle.

    BTW, as far as I remember, this is not the first thread on mitzvah tantz.

    in reply to: Big Choco Chip Cookie Recipe #931024
    EY Mom
    Participant

    If I were you, I would just use a regular chocolate chip cookie recipe and make the cookies large. If you want the coffee flavor, just add coffee powder (not granules!)to the recipe, or use coffee-extract instead of the vanilla extract.

    Here is my sister’s chocolate chip cookie recipe, it is yum! It makes about 70 small cookies, so depending on how many cookies you need you might have to multiply the recipe:

    1 cup margarine

    3/4 cup dark brown sugar

    3/4 cup white sugar

    2 eggs

    1 tsp. salt

    1 tsp. vanilla extract

    1 tsp. baking soda

    2 1/4 cups flour

    1 package chocolate chips

    Cream the margarine and sugars. Add the eggs one at a time and beat, then add the vanilla extract and beat. Add salt, baking soda, flour and mix, then add chocolate chips.

    These need 8-10 minutes at 350 degrees for smaller cookies, so if you are making huge ones they probably need 12-15. I am paranoid about baking times, so I would probably still check them after 10. Make sure not to crowd them on the cookie sheet because they spread.

    If you are in EY, so 1 cup of margarine = 1 Israeli package. Increase the flour to 2 1/2 cups, too, because American flour is heavier. 350F = 180C.

    Hatzlachah and a freilichen Purim!

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927194
    EY Mom
    Participant

    RBS Jew:

    Chareidim don’t make anyone pay more. You would be paying the same amount of Arnona regardless of whether I get a 90% discount or none at all.

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927183
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Miriam, because part of being in society means that some of your tax dollars (or shekels in this case) are always going to go for things you don’t necessarily agree with. Our tax dollars go to subsidizing the theater, the opera, and other entertainment we don’t participate in or even feel is right. (And the kollelim get a lot less government money than the entertainment industry.)

    Mdd, I don’t know what you are referring to when you say that staying in kollel in EY is the same as US is a big chiddush. If you’re saying that you always thought that in EY there were more benefits than in the US, then now you know that’s not the case, for sure if you’re talking about NY. The counterbalance to that is that the lifestyle in EY is of a much lower material standard.

    And again, as the OP stated in his last comment – chareidim work!! I work, and so does my husband. But we still do not cross the threshold of having to pay income tax.

    In Israel, there are NO tangible benefits that are given on basis of income – no food stamps, etc. Kitzvat yeladim is the same for everyone. There are only discounts on taxes like Arnona. Why am I taking advantage because we have a certain amount of children and a certain income?

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927174
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Zahavasdad, there are no food stamps or Section 8 in Israel. The basic Kupat Cholim “sal” is free for everyone. If you want more extensive coverage, you pay, and everyone pays the same amount up to 4 kids. Over four kids, the rest are free. Bituach Leumi payments are also the same for everyone. If one is working than it is deducted as a percentage of salary, if not then it is a flat rate.

    Englishman: exactly. No family can live off what the government gives unless 1) at least one spouse is working at a nice job or 2) they are being supported by someone else. The myth of chareidim “living off the government” is just that – a myth. That is why in most chareidi families with 6 kids, the father is not in kollel. He may be a maggid shiur, a cheder rebbe, a rosh kollel, etc. – but he is working.

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927166
    EY Mom
    Participant

    mdd:

    I am assuming that you are asking how much they get from the government per month.

    If the husband is in kollel, then he gets 750 shekel a month.

    Kitzvat yeladim: Same as any Israeli family with 6 kids, I think it comes to somewhere between 1200-1400 shekel a month (that’s an estimated guess based on the amount of children I have).

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927153
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Mdd, “the chareidim” are not on the government’s payroll, at least not anymore than anyone else in this country. That’s the point you’re missing.

    Men who learn in kollel are not the equivalent of a university student. They would be the equivalent of people who are in research or who are part of a think tank. Are they considered people who are not working? No. Why not? Because what it comes down to in the end is that the secular establishment views Torah learning as a waste of time, but research as a valid pursuit. So the secular establishment has no problem with the government supporting research and think tanks, but has a major problem with kollelim.

    The kollel stipend is the only one that can be classified as benefitting chareidim alone. The child subsidy benefits anyone who qualifies. It is not based on income. If you make 5,000,000 shekel a year and have 2,3,4 or 5 children, you will get the same child subsidy as one who makes 5,000 shekel a year and has the same amount of children.

    And I have another bit of news: The average Bnei Brak housewife might work as a programmer, but her husband is not in kollel. He is working, too – and most likely still does not have to pay income tax because they are not making enough to cross the threshold. And the kitzvat yeladim is not what is going to make the difference.

    The myth that all chareidi men are in kollel is ridiculous. Among young couples, it might very well be that the majority of men are in kollel. But not in the chareidi community as a whole.

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927146
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Mdd, you are making the same mistake by characterizing the entire chareidi population as not working.

    Let me ask you something: If a chiloni husband works and his wife stays home, are they considered a working family?

    The answer should be yes.

    Then by the same token, if I am working and my husband is in kollel, then my family is also a working family.

    And if like most chareidi families, the husband is either working or working and learning, and the wife is working, then why are we not considered working families? Because many of us don’t make enough to cross the income tax threshold?

    I will reiterate: Any chiloni family is more than welcome to have the number of children we have, and make the same income. If they do, they also will not have to pay income tax.

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927142
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Zahavasdad, then your relatives are not at all typical of the average Israeli family, or even of the average American family that actually lives here on their own without family support.

    Income taxes paid by chiloni families do nothing to support chareidi families. If anything, you might say that in cities like Yerushalayim, chilonim pay municipal taxes that fund services from which chareidim benefit. True. So what? Our municipal taxes fund things like the Batsheva Dance Troupe and the Israeli opera, tickets to which are heavily subsidized by the government.

    My taxes funded the bailout of the kibbutzim, too. So?

    What you are not getting is that 1) any chiloni family is welcome to have the same amount of children we have and get the exact same subsidy. They are entitled to it. It is their choice not to, and 2) That the average chareidi WORKING family makes far less than the average chiloni family, and the income tax breaks we get are the same they would get were they to live in our income bracket.

    There is no subsidy that benefits chareidim specifically except for the $200 per month that is given to the kollelim. Period. Those who can afford to jet back and forth to the US are being jetted by their families, and if their parents can afford it, may Hashem bless them.

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927121
    EY Mom
    Participant

    And to zahavasdad:

    To call the chareidi community a “non-working segment of the population” is to buy into the lie that the secular Leftist media is trying – successfully – to market.

    Most chareidi women work. They work as teachers, speech therapists, graphic designers, interior designers, accountants, computer programmers, marketing writers and more. Suddenly, when it comes to chareidim, working women don’t count anymore.

    And I’ll tell you a secret: Most chareidi men work, too. Are many of them cheder rebbeim and maggidei shiurim? Yes. So what? If male teachers and professors in Israeli public schools and universities are considered working, then so are their chareidi equivalents. And if cheder rebbeim and maggidei shiurim are not considered working, then neither can male teachers and professors be considered as such. It works both ways.

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927120
    EY Mom
    Participant

    There is a lot of confusion on this topic.

    The approximately $200 a month is correct. That is what is referred to as “datot”. That is what the government gives married men who are learning full time in kollel. Not one penny more. Kollelim that pay more are doing so with funds that the roshei kollel raise privately, and that have nothing to do with the government.

    There is something else called “kitzvat yeladim”. This has nothing to do with being chareidi. It is an across-the-board monthly stipend that goes up according to the number of children the family has. It is not major money, but it helps. A family with 8 children gets about 1850 NIS per month, which is about $425-$450.

    Obviously, chareidi families on the whole get more kitzvat yeladim than their secular counterparts, because they have more children. This stipend only goes up to age 18, by the way, meaning that for every child who turns 18, the stipend gets reduced.

    Then there are tax breaks. These also apply equally, based on income and the number of children. There are income tax breaks, and then municipal tax breaks. These, too, have nothing to do with chareidim.

    Is it true that chareidim pay less income tax than the rest of the population? Yes, obviously, because our income bracket is much lower and our birthrate is much higher. Any chiloni family is welcome to make the same income and have the same amount of children, and they will get the exact same tax break.

    in reply to: Keeping Challah fresh from Friday night to Shabbos morning Seudah #925743
    EY Mom
    Participant

    If you’re talking about store-bought or freshly baked challos on Friday that you want to stay fresh for the seudos on Shabbos day – so if they’re store-bought then yes, shrink-wrap them if you can. If not, then as soon as you get home – for home-baked, when they have cooled off somewhat but are still nice and warm – wrap them tightly all around in a few layers of plastic wrap, and freeze.

    For leftover challah, as soon as you are finished eating the challah, wrap it as tightly as possible in a food storage bag, then twist-close (not tie) that in another food storage bag, and then in the freezer. Unless you eat challah with the soup, chicken, etc., just leave a slice on the table for bentching and wrap up the rest right after the fish.

    In any case, the important thing is to get all the air out.

    in reply to: Sherut Leumi… I don't know what to do #926101
    EY Mom
    Participant

    You can also call 144, hatzlacha with everything!!!!!

    in reply to: Sherut Leumi… I don't know what to do #926099
    EY Mom
    Participant

    I hear, snowbunny. So let’s do this. I’ll give you a clue so you can look up my SIL’s number in either the Newcomer’s Guide or the Madrich HaChareidi. It’s not like she’s not listed or anything, I’m just nervous about info on the Internet. So here goes:

    Her last name in gematriya is 2-200-10-10-50-60. They are the only ones with that last name in Moshav Mattityahu. You can tell her that her SIL suggested you call. I already spoke to her about this sweet seminary girl I met online!!

    If you do speak to her, please ask her for my phone number; I would love to say hi to you in person!

    in reply to: Sherut Leumi… I don't know what to do #926097
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Hi Snowbunny!

    I am so sorry, I did not see that the mods can’t give you my information.

    Rabbi Leff lives in Moshav Mattityahu. He is the Rav there, my SIL lives there, too.

    Mods, can I give you the info and you will pass it on to Snowbunny? Or is there some secure place I can post it? I just do not feel comfortable posting my SIL’s information on the Internet.

    in reply to: Sherut Leumi… I don't know what to do #926079
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Snowbunny, please don’t make any decisions yet. Nechoma is right that THIS is the time you have to learn, grow and build yourself.

    I just spoke to one of my sisters-in-law who is Rabbi Zev Leff’s daughter. She will be more than happy to put you in contact with her father, who teaches in Pninim and knows Rabbi Meisels very well. She cannot promise to what extent he will be able to help you, but he is a wonderful, warm person and a very good contact who will do what he can. They also have girls for Shabbos almost every week.

    Mods, please give snowbunny3318 my personal email so that she can contact me, and I can give her my SIL’s name, phone number and other information.

    in reply to: Gemachs in Israel #917278
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Hi there -regards from your other post! πŸ™‚

    I don’t know about Yerushalayim, there is one in Beitar called Yad Leah. I know that there is supposed to be a great one in Mattersdorf; unfortunately, I don’t know what it’s called but maybe another poster will help jog my memory.

    If you can get a hold of a Madrich HaChareidi there is a whole gemach listing there in the orange pages.

    Hatzlachah!

    in reply to: What did the dirty diaper-throwing individuals hope to accomplish? #917397
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Chalilavchas, whether they daven in shuls or not is irrelevant. If they would be thrown into jail, they would be regarded as martyrs by their very few admirers.

    Besides which, the poster about civil disobedience happens to be correct. These things upset us because of the chilul Hashem involved. But in terms of protests, if this would be any other population it would go quietly into the night. In terms of doing anything illegal, what is it – disturbing the peace?

    Please be aware that there is a HUGE double standard here in EY. Chareidim can be arrested for incitement when they compare police chiefs to Nazis, but when Leftist columnists compare Netanyahu to a Nazi no one says boo. I am not defending Nazi comparisons of anybody, but if it’s grounds for arrest then it should be across the board – which it never is.

    The same goes for this kind of stuff.

    in reply to: Sherut Leumi… I don't know what to do #926069
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Snowbunny, you sound like such a special person! I wish I could get to know you – really! It is unclear from your post (or at least I didn’t “chap” it) – are you currently in EY or in the US?

    Please forgive me if giving outright advice seems forward of me, I am only doing it because I care: If you are here in EY now, and you can find a Rav here who can guide you, I think it might make your life and your decision-making much easier. There are Rabbonim like R’ Zecharya Greenwald and R’ Meisels who are very caring people and who have experience with a very broad spectrum of girls (so you won’t have to feel that they might box you in). Their numbers can be found in any Yerushalayim phone book and probably in the Newcomers Guide, as well.

    If helping and giving are what you are looking for in Sherut Leumi, there are plenty of places like Ezer MiZion, Yad Sarah and Zichron Menachem who are happy to get volunteers. As far as room and board, there are also families who have girls board with them in exchange for help with the kids, something that might also have the added advantage of getting an “inside look.”

    Again, you sound like a very special person who has a tremendous amount of potential. May Hashem bless you with hatzlachah in all you do!!

    in reply to: Sherut Leumi… I don't know what to do #926062
    EY Mom
    Participant

    To 147:

    I am sorry, but your post makes you sound just like those whom you are slamming – claustrophobic, sinas chinam, etc.

    Are there people like that in the “right wing” (btw, how are you defining that?)? I’m sure that, however defined, there are. There are also people like that who are Modern Orthodox, Reform, Conservative, Mizrachi, Chardal, Sephardi, Ashkenazi, Litvish, Chassidish, Yeshivish, and any other label you can come up with.

    in reply to: Sherut Leumi… I don't know what to do #926061
    EY Mom
    Participant

    I think that the poster who asked what the goal is behind Sherut Leumi was asking a good question. Is there a reason you would rather do that then continue your education?

    I am asking because from what I hear, unless I am reading you wrong (if I am, I apologize), Peninim has a seminary that sounds as though it might be right up your alley. I have a niece who also does not fit a real mold, she is now at this sem and she is thrilled. She is not typical Beis Yaakov, yet MO is not for her, either. They are very accepting, very open-minded, very encouraging of questions.

    If you think this might interest you, post me back and I will ask my SIL for info.

    Whatever your decision, may you have much hatzlachah!!

    in reply to: What did the dirty diaper-throwing individuals hope to accomplish? #917382
    EY Mom
    Participant

    First of all, don’t necessarily believe everything you read, certainly not before checking it out. There was once a report of people throwing dirty diapers at the Women at the Wall. Pray tell, where did they get dirty diapers at the Kosel? It later turned out to be false.

    But assuming that this story is true, the answer to your question, unfortunately, is that they do not hope to accomplish anything at all. These are people who have a very long history with the establishment in EY, and they are not forgetting it. It is warping their worldview. They are angry and expressing it in what is obviously a highly negative and destructive fashion.

    Will they be punished? Go find them first.

    How can they be taught to stop doing things like that? Probably, they can’t. Realize that these people are not the ones sitting in the beis midrash learning with hasmadah, or who have regular jobs.

    Who can stop them best? No one. The Eidah HaChareidis condemns these things on a regular basis and it doesn’t help. The only thing that might stop them is if the press – chareidi and otherwise – would begin to totally ignore them and act as if they don’t exist. But since the secular press LOVES these stories, I wouldn’t bet on that happening too soon.

    Probably all we can do is make clear that they do not speak for or represent the mainstream chareidi community, however defined. Truth to tell, they don’t even represent Yerushalmim. They represent themselves.

    in reply to: Working and Learning #916681
    EY Mom
    Participant

    I have no idea of specific shadchanim, but –

    You might be able to find that type of boy in Ner Yisroel, and there are frum boys in YU – like ones from MO backgrounds who became more shtark but whose parents didn’t want them going to a black-hat yeshiva – who might fit into that category. If you can consider a boy who wants to learn for a few years and then work, you will probably find a larger pool in either NI or YU.

    I have no idea how old you are, but maybe looking at an older age range might help?

    May Hashem send you your bashert soon, and much hatzlachah!

    in reply to: Infertility treatments – Tzedaka?? #883784
    EY Mom
    Participant

    Because these two organizations are trying to help couples fulfill a mitzvah.

    HaQer has a good point, and it can be taken further almost ad infinitum.

    People who can’t afford a real Shabbos could technically buy a few whole loaves of bread, make kiddush and hamotzi on them, and they’ve fulfilled the mitzvah of seudos on Shabbos. Does that mean that organizations trying to give needy families a real Shabbos aren’t worthy of our donations?

    The same thing goes for medical relief organizations. Not everything they do is pikuach nefesh. Should we say, hey, if these people can’t afford it, why should we have to pay for their medical needs?

    Couples can get married without having a traditional wedding. All you need is a chosson, kallah, two eidim and a mesader kiddushin. Just because they’ve decided that they want to have a semblance of a real wedding with music, a seudah and dancing, does that mean the tzibbur has to pay for it?

    I would like to honor your request about not telling you that you’re being insensitive. I think I would be able to, if not for your comment about the pool, the requisite “lehavdil” notwithstanding.

    Perhaps you are not yet married, or, if you are, you have never undergone the yissurim of fertility/secondary infertility, and perhaps you don’t even know anyone who has. It would seem to me that, if you had any inkling of the excruciating pain these couples go through, you would never have been able to use installing a pool as a legitimate mashal.

    If you personally have a question about these organizations, the best thing to do would be to ask your personal Rav if you should donate.

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