yitzymotcha

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Viewing 46 posts - 1 through 46 (of 46 total)
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  • in reply to: Saw you at sinai #1879331
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I assume by “learning guy” you mean a bochur sitting in yeshiva learning and in shidduchim. Wouldn’t such bochrim be getting set up by their rebbyim and chaverim and shachanim. Especially the Lakewood types? Either way, good luck with shiduchim.

    in reply to: How was Daf Yomi studied originally? #1878658
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    DovidBt
    Maybe Rashi did quote himself in conversation. Who knows. I read last week that someone asked the Chofetz Chaim a shalyla and he told him to look it up in the mishnah berurah.

    in reply to: Straw Borsalino hats? #1875426
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Joseph,
    I don’t know if you were addressing what I wrote. I understand your marines analogy but I don’t think its the same. I think there are more important things than levush and I wish certain things such as how Hashem loves me and to have an emotionally connection to Hashem were stressed. Then again, I realize I am asking to have had a neochassidic chinuch and my rebbeyim were not neochassidim. And not a total neochosid but I do have some leanings within a litvish framework.
    I sometimes wonder if the whole emphasis on the yeshivish levush then was to build up a tzibur. Today no kid in high school has a hava amina to not wear a white shirt every day. But today’s roshay yeshiva wore stripe shirts. So does it really matter?

    in reply to: Straw Borsalino hats? #1875218
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    When I was growing up in the 70s-80s I think they yeshivish world felt more threatened than the modern orthodox world so they put a bigger stress on on outward dress? Does anyone find that to be true today? I remember taking a bchina in 5th grade for a new yeshiva and a kid there had a knitted yarmulka on. The head said :”I told you to not wear that in yeshiva” and the kid said “I forgot not to wear it” to which he replied “if you threw it away you wouldn’t forget”. You don’t want to know what scandals that yeshiva had. Its unfortunate they cared about the kipa sruga instead.
    Sometimes I wonder why when I went to yeshiva we heard about wearing a hat instead of how much Hashem loves us.

    in reply to: Straw Borsalino hats? #1875139
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    My rebby in Chaim Berlin wore a black straw hat in the summer when I was a bochur. And this wasn’t in the 1940s. He is still a rebby, but doesn’t wear the straw hat.
    The nothing “wrong” with a straw hat. A lot of the hat issue, color, up/down etc is a symbol of which group you belong to. Today its not yeshivish to wear one so people who care about that for various reasons don’t wear one.

    in reply to: African-American Role Models #1869259
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    huju,
    Being that you are an African American, I hope I haven’t insulted you. Do my comments earlier ring true to you? I am honestly curious.

    in reply to: African-American Role Models #1868871
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I do want to add imagine you are a poor black kid in the inner city. You have relatives who have been in jail. You would understandably have a lot of anger. You have two options. Rappers from your neighborhood who sing angry songs. And they wear the chains, caps, of all the people on your block. Then you have Condoleezza Rice former Provost of Stanford University which you never heard of all coifed up in the White House. Who would you relate to better? We also forget that there actually are a lot of religious blacks in the inner city who really are turned off by rappers.

    in reply to: African-American Role Models #1868869
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I hope our kids are looking up to gedolim, not singers. Do yeshivish kids (only community I really know) look up to singers over gedolim? They spend all that money on gedolim cards.
    Re who you look up to-it depends on how you are raised. I taught high school social studies in the public school system for a year as a student. The first half year was in a heavily minority program. When a black kid would say how “we blacks are better than this” the other kids would say “who are you? Rosa Parks?” Then I switched to a much better school. I had one black kid in my class-straight A student. On PTA night his father told me how they talk politics every night at the dinner table and come from a long line of politicians. This kid played guitar was cultured etc. Funny thing was he once took out a bottle of Kedem grape juice and this jewish kid said where’d you get that!

    in reply to: How was Daf Yomi studied originally? #1868063
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Haimy,
    You are asking a historical question. You’d need to find a written source discussing daf yomi from the 1920s. Do we have the text of Rav Meir Schapiro’s speech calling for Daf Yomi at Katowitz? Does he mention Rashi? Do we have kol koray’s from the period? In the 1980s by a siyum hashas the Kloysenberger Rebbe said one should learn Rashi and Tosfos! That sounds like a lot to me though.
    I started the most recent cycle and it has been amazing. I do Artscroll. Some days I learn just Artscrol and some days Rashi inside too. As lowercourt says, Artscrol brings the Rashi’s on the bottom. You don’t know the future but my attitude is Baezres Hashem if I miss a Rashi or even a blatt I hope I still have 5 more cycles to build on what I learn now. Each cycle will get easier. And I know each day exactly what I have to learn that day.

    in reply to: No evidence it was racially motivated. #1867559
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    After Bloomberg spoke at the Democratic convention in 2016 I heard De Blasio on the radio say that it was a good speech even though Bloomberg is a rich person and it was the rich people who caused all the problems in this country. He kept saying it over and over.
    I wonder if on some level perhaps even subconsciously, De Blasio likes it when he sees all the symbols of capitalism like the rich people’s stores being trashed.

    in reply to: Maariv Minyanim During Curfew #1867269
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Mi Kamcha Yisroel
    The mayor says there will be a curfew so Yiddin scramble as responsible law abiding citizens to determine how they can observe the curfew yet go to shul and mikva.
    Meanwhile the curfew comes and goes and thousands of protesters are on the streets.

    in reply to: Empirical data: how did we handle COVID vs our neighbors? #1865766
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I don’t know the particulars. My understanding is that poskim rely on research done on non Jews. However, there is scholarly literature arguing that the food you eat does effect metabolism and can impact test results on say the effectiveness of medication. That is why certain people call for the inclusion of minority test subjects in studies.

    in reply to: BIGGEST JEWISH DEBATE: DO YOU WASH YOUR TZITZIS??? #1865093
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Is this inspired by the recent kichel cartoon in Mishpacha?

    in reply to: Virtual chavrusas? #1862861
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Reb Eliezer,
    I’m still looking for a chavrusa but thanks. Thats a great thread. Would you know of a whatsapp group where you can ask daf questions? Daf Hashavua has one.

    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    ubiquitin basically said what I was wondering when I started the thread. All of a sudden so many Yidden died. I read that the chevra kadisha in Boro Park that does over 90% of the taharos at most gets 200 taharos a month and here in one month they did 1000! I was a real pandemic not something made up yet for some people olam kaminhago holeich when it comes to safety practices. Granted the people at the yeshiva today were wearing masks but still they all use the same bathroom, sink, we are an am navon. That’s why I wondered. Do their rabonim really tell them its Shomair pasayim Hashem? I guess I’ve beaten a dead horse though.

    in reply to: Virtual chavrusas? #1862825
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I’m bumping this up. I got a great virtual night seder chavrusa from this thread. I got a morning daf yomi chavrusa (9 am on the phone) from a separate way, not YWN, but he is BH going back to work. (I’m working remote the whole summer). If anyone wants to learn day yomi 9 am (NY time) over the phone please let me know. Thanks.

    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I hear what everyone is saying. Maybe the media is just focusing on us. It is true that non Jews are clamoring to open up.
    hachareidi-are there real poskim who paskened to open yeshivas? to crowd in the streets?

    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    That’s an insult.

    in reply to: Who (decides who) gets to be “mainstream?” #1861612
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Is there really mainstream? Mainstream for Flatbush in the 20s vs. the 30s? Mainstream for yeshivish vs. heimish? Mainstream for modern right wing vs. left wing? Mainstream for NY v. Lakewood, out of town etc…

    in reply to: Emor and Mother`s Day Dvar Torah #1858441
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Does anyone know of tshuvos dealing with Mother’s Day in halacha? Chukas akum etc. I looked and couldn’t find.

    in reply to: what will post covid-19 look like? #1856883
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Akuperma,
    You make good points. I’m finishing a second masters and its totally online from a reputable university. Very convenient. (They taught us to say- you make good points online 🙂 but you did make good points….
    If NYC loses its status as such an important place (NY Times said it could take years to regain prominence) would housing prices drop? Would frum people stop moving here as much for jobs if they can telecommute? That would drop housing prices.
    Hi froggie,
    Very inspirational. I will say one thing. I’m not hugging or even shaking hands with anyone until I know this is over for a long time!

    in reply to: COVID-19 Vaccine & Anti-Vaxxers #1856816
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I expect anti vaxers to claim that COVID-19 was invented to force them to vaccinate. I don’t believe that of course. I do wonder if we would be forced to vaccinate but I believe the medical establishment so lmaasa I’d do it. But I admit that the potential overreach of govt can be concerning. (This from a guy who hasn’t left house in 6 weeks since I live with my older parents).

    in reply to: what will post covid-19 look like? #1856558
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Rosh Hashana? Forever?
    Right after Purim I told a lady at work I couldn’t shake her hand because of corona. She responded by saying her husband was in a hospital and they found a corona case. I had no idea what would become…

    in reply to: Refund For Seminaries Due To COVID-19 #1856453
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Re colleges. Because the governor in NJ required colleges to clear out the dorms the college I’m in offered students a prorated refund for dorm, dining, and parking charges so they did give somewhat of a refund.

    in reply to: Vishnitz philosophy #1854577
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Is there an idea in chasidus that the rebbe can look at you and read your mind? I found an academic article about that and Viznitz but it was in Hebrew so I didn’t want to break my head on it (save brain for a Rashba).

    in reply to: Vishnitz philosophy #1854476
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    rox-is there an inyan behind this?

    in reply to: Vishnitz philosophy #1854396
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    What are tnuos? Physical movement?

    in reply to: Vishnitz philosophy #1854112
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    There was a Viznitzer Rebbe in Shotz Romania before the war. He was a member of the Hagar family. Not many people know about that. My great grandfather was his shamas or gabay. I’m named after him. I think Seret Viznitz in Eretz Yisroel might be a continuation of Shotz Viznitz. I am not sure. I am not chasidish.
    Back to your topic-how many pages is this?

    in reply to: Virtual chavrusas? #1842778
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Achsameach,
    Thanks. Is there a way to exchange information without posting it here publicly?

    in reply to: Are you a bechor? #1842167
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Its true that you don’t need a minyan. I once overslept so I called my rov and asked if there was any heter to eat. Instead he told me to come over and he made a siyum for me. He finished Rosh Hashana. Then he told me the rema says the minhag is to redo the eiruv chatzaros Erev pesach so he had me be zoche in the matza for his block but he said we won’t make a bracha because itsa a safek if there’s an eruv in Flatbush.

    in reply to: Are you a bechor? #1842025
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I’m a few blatt behind from finishing Brachas in daf yomi so its working out perfect.
    Can you do this live stream?

    in reply to: Is coronavirus BAD?? #1841440
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    In the beginning I also thought COVID-19 was exaggerated. Afterall, “don’t X amount die from the flu every year!” (I don’t remember the number). But I watch Dr. Fauci, who is the gov’ts dr. but says it is it is, and he explained that if you look around you can’t see how bad it is because untill it peaks we are always two weeks behind since a person can have the virus yet not show symptoms for two weeks. So we walk around thinking “gee I’m ok” and keep infecting each other.
    It’s been pretty stupid the way people continue to spread it around. I got my parents to no longer have our cleaning lady. Instead I’m cleaning for Shabbos and Pesach.

    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    My meds are for bipolar II. But people act out of ignorance (I am not saying you). They don’t even know the difference between Bipolar I and Bipolar II (not that they are expected too).
    Being married to someone with a mental illness that is not controlled is a serious problem.
    But why would you worry that a guy would stop taking his meds if he hasn’t stopped taking them for the last 23 years? True, the body can change and meds can need to be adjusted but lets say a girl is 40. The guy she marries may develop many other physical problems too. Gosh, I meet girls under 40 who are almonos so their husbands died! People can get cancer at any time.
    But I’ve had enough therapy and I’m studying to go into a second career as a therapist to know that everyone is entitled to their feelings 🙂 That actually is the one thing I can think is a “maalah” of what I’ve gone through. It’s made me more compasionate.

    in reply to: Keeping Mental Illness A Secret In Shidduchim🤕 🤒🤐👰🤵 #1481835
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    So I called a girl tonight and she says, a great guy like you, why aren’t you married. I get evasive and ask her, why aren’t you married? She sighs and says how hard it is to fimnd a guy who isn’t divorced OR ON MEDS
    Ok. So I’ve proved my point. Truth is, evberyone has their pekel.
    How do I get positive?

    in reply to: Keeping Mental Illness A Secret In Shidduchim🤕 🤒🤐👰🤵 #1480827
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Many poskim say to tell on the 3rd date. Others say there no “vort davka” in the 3rd date. Its an inyan that you can’t get the girl to fall for you and then tell her you have a mood disorder. 3 dates 6 hours each is different than 3 dates 2 hours each. I think we’d all agree on that. And a 22 year old bochur’s 3rd date is different than a 40 year old baal habos’s 3rd date.
    That being said, of course I’d tell the girl about my mood disorder before it gets serious.

    I wish there was a book of stories of people on medicine who got married.

    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Is there a way to respond to each post separately? I’m relatively new here.
    Mrs. Most told me she doesn’t work with mental illness only physical issues or people in their 40s. She was nice when I spoke to her.
    RebYidd-you make a good point. Certain meds are problematic during pregnancy. Not all though.
    Shopping-I think you are making two points. 1-You seem to be not looking for a guy in kollel who will be supported by others. That seems separate from struggling with issues. I can understand that. Then 2-a person can struggle without it being mental illness. I understand that too. I agree with you that not “everyone has issues”. I hate when people say that. But in a sense, the older I get and the more I see, I start to see people really get issues! I think its a statistic. Every day is a potential for an issue.
    When I was in yeshiva I was mkana the two best guys in my shiur (good friends of mine). I was depressed and they were the top learners. Well what happens? One nebuch loses a child to cancer and the other survives (bh) cancer. When I was having kinah did I know what was going to happen to the people I was having kinah on? Of course not. And terribly there are people younger than me who I have watched pass away. So in a sense I can count my blessings that I am alive. But I still so much want to get married and fear rejection for taking meds.

    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Thanks for understanding.
    I didn’t really mean she had to take meds. I meant she should have an issue so we could understand each other and support each other. Of course a marriage isn’t about common challenges. I once almost got engaged to a Russian baalas tshuva. I think we understood each other. But people look at me and don’t see that I take meds etc (which is a good thing) so they don’t red me the shiduchim that have a higher probability of working out.

    in reply to: Keeping Mental Illness A Secret In Shidduchim🤕 🤒🤐👰🤵 #1479831
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Can anyone tell me how I could find a great girl who is on meds like myself? All I get are girls who have “no problems”. I want someone who struggled a little like me so we’d understand each other as strange as it sounds. There are shadchanim for this but they have no one.
    When I am married I will be a shadchan for people on meds. I would do it now but I am not sure how.

    in reply to: What’s a girl to do if her father is not a Talmid Chacham? #1348602
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    If a girl has a brother in yeshiva he can look around yeshiva and get her va shiduch with a good learner even if her father isn’t a talmid chochom. That’s what I did!
    Now, if the girl has a good job like being an accountant, pt, ot (you know the drill) then she’s upping her odds of getting a guy who wants to learn in kollel too since she can support him.
    I’m not saying she needs to do this. There are many fine working guys. But it can be done.

    in reply to: When Yossi’s depression was mistaken for Atzlus by his mashgiach #1341265
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Many many years ago, way before the frum community could ever dream of such a thing as Relief (they barely had meds in those days like today), my menahel told me to go to a psychologist for my depression. (I went, he was a lousy psychologist but that’s beside the point).
    When I did poorly on my bechina my menahel explained to me how in the stock market there is something called a correction which means the stocks are artificially undervalued but will rise in price any day. A good investor knows where to invest then so he can buy low and sell high. My rebby told me how “I’m a good investor and I know you about to have a correction so I am investing in you and giving you a 100 based on the future”.
    My rebby was from those that understood. There are others that understand too though but definitely not all. I feel for those that had rebbeyim that didn’t get it.

    in reply to: Anxiety, Bitachon, and Morons (Dah mah shetashiv l'moron) #1341000
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I think there is merit to what gavriel is saying.
    Is anxiety purely neurological? I’m not an expert, just a simple fellow. The way I explain things to myself is that there is something called a biopsychosocial aproach to mental health. So there are 3 parts. Biology, psychology, and the social context. If anxiety was purely biological then all we could do is take medication. But most people with anxiety are open to medication if needed and psychology/therapy. Albert Ellis was a famous cognitive behavioral therapist who stopped using the word anxiety. He said people were anxietizing themself by the beliefs they were telling themselves. He was an atheist but he’d agree that if telling yourself you have a strong G-d walking next to you helps you then by all means do it.
    I also don’t think OCD is the only way anxiety can manifest itself. How about, OMG, if I make a wrong turn while driving I’ll end up in a bad neighborhood and the people will mug me. Is that OCD?
    What I don’t like about using G-d to allieviate anxiety is that what if the anxious person then starts asking, “yes, but who says G-d esists…” We just went from one doubt (maybe I’ll be harmed) to another doubt. So, if there are more effective ways of dealing with the anxiety I’d go with them. But if bitachon works, do what works.

    in reply to: Anxiety, Bitachon, and Morons (Dah mah shetashiv l'moron) #1340701
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    I think that bitachon may help some (I stress some) people with anxiety.
    Anxiety can be irrational and bitachon can be rational (if properly understood) but being rational actually can help one deal with irrational thoughts. In CBT or cognitive behavioral therapy one looks to replace irational thoughts with rational thoughts. I could potentially see bitachon incorporated into this.
    Now, you do what works and if it wouldn’t work then definitely don’t do it. And you can’t just say, have bitachon. When you use CBT you are taught how to use it, not just told, think rationally.

    in reply to: Hamentaschens: Open or Closed? #1244274
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    It’s supposed to be closed because of hester but then we’d never know the flavor when we buy them.

    in reply to: What yeshiva should I go to? #1244273
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Are you open to going out of Brooklyn?

    in reply to: need kiruv advice #1244272
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    rebshiduch,

    You can definitely choose that.

    in reply to: need kiruv advice #1244239
    yitzymotcha
    Participant

    Rebshiduch,
    Where do things stand? Are you going to speak once more on the phone to say good bye?
    If it was me
    I’d start by respecting their decision
    I would thank the person for learning with me because of how much I gained from the experience (new insight to my own Judaism, thinking about great questions they rose).
    I’d ask for feedback on what they found most interesting/enjoyable from the learning.
    I’d ask if they were to consider continuing or restarting what time would they see working best and topic they’d find most interesting.
    Of course I’d talk to the group who sponsors the learning.

    A guy I know told someone not frum a hashkafa vort and the guy got interested in learning. I was set up with the person to learn through an organization and told that “gemara works better than hashkafa” so we learned brachas for a few weeks and the guy really was uninterested and dropped. In hindsight I would have learned fascinating hashkafa with him. The truth is that would have been a lot more work for me at that time but it would have worked I believe. There may be packets made by smart organizations for kiruv. I recently participated in a one night session through Ohr Sameach and they had a fascinating packet. Wasn’t hashkafa but it was done top notch intellectually for college kids. It traced the gemara about yaharog vaal yaavor to questions like abortion, when to give over a person in a city etc.
    Hatzlacha in your kiruv.

Viewing 46 posts - 1 through 46 (of 46 total)