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  • in reply to: Bullying Smokers and vapers in frum velt #1787996

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Is it because it’s a disgusting habit as you say? Why only bully people with this specific “disgusting habit”? Maybe we should bully people who talk with food in their mouth, or dont cover their mouth when they sneeze, or leave dirty tissues behind in shul? I bet you have some habits that others might find “disgusting”, should they bully you about it?

    in reply to: learning from an artscroll #1765145

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Sara Levine,
    Perhaps you’re right, maybe before artscroll a lot of people couldn’t learn. And now they could and that’s a great zchus for the publishers. But that’s not what the OP asked and that’s not what e everyone before you was addressing. OP specifically asked why Bnei Torah dont like to use it.

    in reply to: New York State is Denying Access to Education to Anti-Vaxer Students #1764955

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Doomsday,
    There was a massive study done in 2015 the Journal of the American Medical Association, in which researchers went over the medical records of 95000 kids, including 15000 kids not vaccinated at age 2 and 8000 still unvaccinated at age 8. This peer reviewed study even had 2000 kids who were considered high risk for autism (bec they had an autistic older sibling). The study found no link between vaccines and autism and in fact found that autism rates were lower in the vaccinated sample. The study also found no difference in autism rates between vax and unvaxxed kids who were considered high risk. Yet we have doomsday saying that the AMA would never do a study comparing the populations, and that unvaxxed kids dont have autism

    in reply to: New York State is Denying Access to Education to Anti-Vaxer Students #1764944

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Abba a,
    You have the most convoluted logic. People who don’t want secular education but would vaccinate, would withhold vaccines to their children just to put them in a non secular education homeschool? Huh? Why would they have to withhold vaccines to go to this homeschool? Also, if homeschool is the way to get out of secular education, why wouldn’t they put together a vaccinated group?
    As to your next point, and this has been gone over so many times, there are children who are medically not able to get vaccines, they rely on being the exception to the rule, so that if everyone is vaccinated and can’t bring in measles, these kids will be safe in the herd immunity. Every additional kid who is unvaccinated increases the chance that someone will bring measles into the school. Additionally the vaccine is 97% effective so if someone brings measles into a school with a couple hundred kids, statistically speaking there will be a handful of vaccinated kids who also catch the disease.
    As to the AIDS point, I think you proved that you dont understand how diseases spread. If HIV spread as easily as you wrote, anyone who took a subway or played in a public park could catch HIV. That’s not how it works, it’s actually difficult and rare to catch HIV in an instance where you dont have direct contact. Even with direct contact you need very certain specific bodily fluids(saliva or sweat don’t do it, it has to be blood, etc) to come on contact with a mucous membrane or directly into the blood flow. Unless someone has an open sore in the mouth they are not catching HIV on their mouth. Measles on the other hand spreads through the air the sick person breathes. To ask if I would rather have an AIDS kid in the class while implying that that means other kids will catch AIDS is either ignorant or disingenuous.

    in reply to: New York State is Denying Access to Education to Anti-Vaxer Students #1764739

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Wow, Abba S,
    Well done. You start with a strawman and end with a false equivalency. Now I won’t blame you for not knowing that there are limits on all of our civil rights (especially when they interfere with public safety) because hey, maybe you were home schooled. As to your ridiculous comparison to AIDS, AIDS is only contagious in some very specific circumstances, an AIDS patient poses almost no public health risk by being in school. Measles on the other hand can be spread through breathing the same air as the patient. By the way, any child who is sick with any cold or flu is told to stay home, or as you call it, has their civil rights violated.

    in reply to: learning from an artscroll #1753142

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Theres nothing wrong with it but I’ll spell out 2 reasons (there may be many more but this is what I could think of right now). First of all, an Artscroll is not appropriate for anyone currently learning in a yeshiva. The yeshiva years are designed to teach boys the skill of “knowing how to learn”. Yeshiva is not meant to be a trade school for rabbis, it’s meant for bochurim to learn from a rebbi a derech halimud and acquire the skills to learn the rest of their lives. This is why the yeshivos focus on certain mesechtos which are conducive to developing these skills. Just as you wouldnt let first graders learning arithmetic use a calculator, anyone learning any skill is better off figuring it out on their own. Secondly, even for those not in yeshiva, our mesora is that Torah is nikneh with ameilus. This doesn’t mean one cant be amul with an artscroll, certainly you can, but for many people, true ameilus comes with working out the gemara on their own.

    in reply to: See It For Yourself #1752868

    too geshmak
    Participant

    I’ve come across the stumptherabbi YouTube channel before. It’s quite comical, they tackle questions such as, “can the rebbe make a mistake?” (Spoiler alert: the answer is no). Most of the questions are answered using only the rebbe as a source. So for example, “how do we know that the rebbe cannot err? Because the rebbe said that a rebbe cannot err”. I hope that this channel represents a very small minority of Chabad. The videos are not long, each one is about 5 or 6 minutes long, its worthwhile to see them because when you see the cognitive dissonance and how far they are from normative Judaism, you’ll realize arguing and engaging in discussion is hopeless and you’ll save yourself the aggravation.

    in reply to: Kosher shaver? Phillips One Blade #1752398

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Shmuff,
    2 questions. Who did you ask? And did you show it to the Rav or explain it to him?

    in reply to: Where Are All The Commentators About The Ethiopian Protests #1751719

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Wow, Old Crown Heights, it sounds like you are justifying these riots.

    in reply to: Kosher Restaurant Review Lashon Harah #1747844

    too geshmak
    Participant

    I think gadol and some of the others have a point in that the customer has a right to spend his money wisely. However, these are subjective opinions which vary from person to person and if I was a newspaper publisher or an influential food writer I wouldn’t want to take it on my pleitzas to disproportionately affect someone else’s parnasa based on my opinion alone

    in reply to: What would it take for you to move “OOT” ?? #1745113

    too geshmak
    Participant

    When people from OOT talk about quality of life, they need to understand that that is a subjective measurement. Personally I feel the quality of life IT is far superior. We have minyonim for shachris starting before 6 oclock and running till as late as you want to daven, mincha from half hour after chatzos till the latest chasidishe zman continuosly, maariv till 2 in the morning. There are choices you can make like which of the 5 to 10 kosher supermarkets competing for your business you will shop, or which school to send your kid, or which hechsher you want to eat, or which shul you want to daven in, and the list goes on. Then there is the convenience. Take my situation, a 10 minute walk from my house is the country’s largest seforim and judaica store. On my way there I pass 7 banks, 3 dry cleaners, 5 pharmacies (including a walgreens), 3 bakeries, 2 bagel stores, 3 barber shops, a kosher grocery, a kosher butcher, kosher fish store, 5 fleishig restaurants, 3 kosher pizza stores, an ice cream store, 7 tznius womens clothing stores, kosher wine, and Jewish owned hardware, electronics, housewares, and discount stores. Quality of life can mean many things, it doesn’t only have to be defined as large houses, yards and less traffic. These are personal preferences.

    in reply to: Is Israel part of galus? #1743091

    too geshmak
    Participant

    I read a really interesting explanation of this topic in the name of Reb Mottel Pegrimansky, one of the great thinkers and baalei musser of pre and post war Europe. He asks, why is there no reference to the establishment of a Jewish state, before moshiach comes, anywhere in tanach, chazal, the zohar or similar places where we find descriptions of moshiach’s arrival. You would think something so momentous would be mentioned if it was part of the geulah OR if it was part of the pre messianic suffering, both of which are described in great detail. His answer is that the state must simply not be part of either one. Rather it is a nisayon, can we stay true to the Torah in a Jewish state. It’s not mentioned because by definition a nisayon cant be revealed ahead of time. However before we can get to the ikvusa d’moshichusa, we need to go thorough many nisyonos and Israel is one of them.

    in reply to: Sports #1727725

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Rebbitzen golden, to compare kashrus and shabbos to sports is disingenuous. There is no way you actually consider those 3 things at the same level. And if you do, well that is the height of daas bal habayis, you’d have to lack perspective completely and I would say you would probably be raising some confused children. When we confuse feelings with halacha, and we can no longer show our kids logical reason why something is wrong, they put the idea in their head that the whole religion is illogical because they cant separate hashkafa from halacha either. Maybe that’s what happened to you when you were younger, and that’s why you confuse sports with kashrus or shabbos. And you can answer that I just dont understand how serious an “issur” following sports is, but I would challenge you to find any issur to follow sports, or even to watch. Going to a stadium may be problematic but even here there are many who would allow it just as they allow taking your children to the circus on chol hamoed. Just a few months ago a well known rav in eretz yisroel was seen on a viral video learning at an English soccer match. He clearly had no interest in what was going on, but felt this was a kosher way to spend quality time with his children and grandchildren.

    in reply to: Sports #1726900

    too geshmak
    Participant

    I’m not sure if we are talking about adults or children. Certainly it would be better for an adult not to be involved in this shtus. But I would say, and my Rav agrees, that when it comes to children, sports is the lesser of most evils. Certainly something like woodworking would be more kosher, but not every kid will be grabbed by that. Besides sports there are so many other temptations kids can fall into from online gaming, to movies, to the apikorsus and worst things you can find on the internet. We have to think long and hard what the ramifications are before we say no to an outlet. Will saying no lead him to something better or worse? Besides kids who play ball naturally want to follow the professionals because they like the sport. So if I want my kids to be active and healthy, I would let them follow the pros and hope they grow out of it as they mature. Many of our gedolim in America grew up following sports, i doubt any of them grew up in the other schmutz kids could easily fall into nowadays

    in reply to: Answers for the tuition crisis #1687360

    too geshmak
    Participant

    I know this would never happen but there would be big savings in multiple yeshivos merging together to form very large institutions. The rebbeim for the most part wont be the ones to lose jobs because you would still need x amount of rebbeim and moros for y amount of students, but all the administrative costs, the building costs, operating costs, transportation costs would decrease significantly. Its extremely inefficient to have multiples of small size schools as some of our larger communities have. As I said I know it wouldn’t happen but people said they don’t want holes poked into ideas, they want ideas, so here’s an idea. What do you think?


    too geshmak
    Participant

    There was no big meeting amongst the yeshivos where they decided to require white shirts. This is a situation that has evolved over time. Our gedolim from Europe who came to America all wore white and this has slowly trickled down. Now we are where we are and a boy who is on yeshiva is making a statement by wearing colored. A statement that he doesn’t want to be part of this community. There is nothing inherently wrong with blue. There are many communities in Klal Yisroel and many of them have some sort of exterior “levush”. If someone finds themselves moving towards MO they may put on a suede kippah, if someone starts relating towards a more chasidish life they may start wearing a bekiche, mizrachi, a kippa seruga and these are all modes of dress that have evolved over time.

    in reply to: Should YWN report on …. #1674296

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Zehavasdad,
    I’m not sure what you mean that his life is a Kiddush hashem, his home life has been trashy tabloid fodder and he missed a quarter of this season because of a steroid suspension. So off the field he’s no role model and on the field he looks for cheap shortcuts over hard work

    in reply to: Is it healthy for yehiva bochurim to learn from a artscroll? #1674138

    too geshmak
    Participant

    Should a 3rd grader use a calculator to do his homework? Most would agree that he shouldn’t. I, as an adult use a calculator for most of the arithmetic that I perform on a daily basis in my field of work, despite the fact that I could do it almost as quickly on paper. However it’s still important that I learned all the basic concepts of arithmetic in my early school days. A yeshiva bochur is learning how to learn. Yes as a balabus he will use the artscroll to learn his daf yomi, even though he doesn’t need it and there’s nothing wrong with that.
    Additionally his skills that he honed in yeshiva will help him with every other sefer he may open for the rest of his life, where there may not be an English version, whether hes looking up a halachah, preparing a dvar Torah for his shabbos table, or any other topic he wants to learn.

    in reply to: Pre-paid Cell Phone Plans #960964

    too geshmak
    Participant

    I heard a couple horror stories about lycamobile. Terrible customer service, they didnt even answer the phone some of the times, and no roaming whatsoever is a problem. There are holes in every company’s coverage but they have roaming deals with other networks that allow them to fill it. On Lyca, if t mobile’s towers dont reach you for a minute, you have no cell phone. Overall, a lot of the issues my friends had were probably due to it being such a new company (in america), so I’d only take the chance for a month if I already had the t mobile phone

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)