Gadolhadorah

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  • in reply to: The Post Kollel Financial Crisis #1315592
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To Joseph:
    You say that “Becoming a “gadol” is not just for the brightest…”

    Well, its clear that I am living proof of your comment but that also makes my point. It is relatively easy to determine after a modest amount of time which of the guys shteiging in the beis medrash are “gadol” material and especially which ones have more than a .0001 percent likelihood of becoming a “gadol hador”. Its unfair to both baalei tzadakah and the bochur himself to use scarce resources for someone in his mid-20s to be painfully trying to understand the complexities of “shor sh’nagach shor”. In some utopian society with unlimited resources, maybe…but in the real world, have everyone find some vocation in which they can excel and move on from that in which they cannot.

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    There is something to be said about keeping the kids closer to home. While there are some exceptional mashgichim ruchani/dorm counselors at out-of-town yeshivos, there are things only a parent would be tuned in to that might provide indicators of emotional and physical issues. LowerTuition above made some great points about what to look for on home visits and thats probably great for really shartke bochurim but not for those who might be prone to get into trouble without real-time monitoring.

    in reply to: The Post Kollel Financial Crisis #1315385
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Joseph Says:

    “Being a Kollel man should not have anything to do with learning ability. Someone who is a poor learner but has a great desire to learn Torah full time has just as much right to be a Kollel man as the best learner in Brisk. ”

    If you are a “poor learner” and also poor from a financial perspective, its probably a good idea to move yourself from behind a shtender and into the workforce. Neither the taxpayers of NY/NJ nor the generous askanim who support worth mosdos have any obligation to support those who are not cut out for learning and are too lazy to get a job. Once you find employment and can support your family, than perhaps its appropriate to find a part-time chavrusah who can learn with you at your level (whatever that might be). There are several very good website that are designed exactly for the purpose of matching part time learning partners who have similar skills and interests. Some provide for meeting at some local shul/beis medrash and others create “virtual” learning chavrusahs online. Either way though, don’t become a burden on the taxpayers or wastefully suck up the limited tzadakah available.

    in reply to: Alternatives to BMG #1315354
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    For many bnai torah, the sheer size and complexity of the BMG network precludes the opportunity to enter into a personal relationship with a Rav/mentor and is simply overwhelming. It works for some but not others. Also, the BMG/Lakewood dependency culture is problematic for many families who want their children to have the opportunity to study in kollel for a few years but ultimately move on to a normal family life with one or both parents working for a parnassah while continuing torah study at some level.

    in reply to: The Post Kollel Financial Crisis #1314410
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    There are many dedicated learners who are fortunate to have affluent parents and/or in-laws or a wife who has a professional career who can provide the resources to support a family in comfort. However, in the absence of those options, one presumes that those choosing to learn full-time have developed a plan or strategy for economic sustenance beyond “the Ebeshter will provide” or “the taxpayers of NY/NJ have an obligation to support my wife and family”.

    in reply to: The Post Kollel Financial Crisis #1314369
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    The point that no one has addressed is why it is impossible for these bochurim to get basic secular education (writing, mathematics, computer etc.) training and skills so if they decide at some point to get their families off welfare and handouts, they have a reasonable opportunity to find employment (part or full time). Its this mindless refusal to consider any secular training that defies logic, even if one wishes to pursue limudei torah on a full time basis for some period.

    in reply to: The Post Kollel Financial Crisis #1314307
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    I also find it hypocritical for Yungerliet to “blame the yeshivos” for not training them and providing them the needed education to earn a parnassah. Hello??? If you are sitting behind a shtender in a beis medrash for 10 years and shteiging 24×7 what would you expect? It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand that your are not going to get hired at a good salary (outside of chinuch or perhaps as a mashgiach which itself requires special training) if you have not secular education, are not proficient on computers, etc. Its your OWN FAULT, not that of the yeshiva which you yourself voluntarily chose to attend. We have recently seen the courts throw out lawsuits filed by college grads against their schools for not adequately training them for good paying jobs. IN those cases, at least they had some training and education. For someone to metaphorically hide themselves in a cave for 10 years, then come out and cry “gevalt” about their limited options in the job market is laughable and doesn’t warrant any sympathy.

    in reply to: Jumping rope #1314032
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Just about every gym and company fitness center I’ve been to has jump ropes available. It often goes unused because it take a bit of coordination and if your not an “accomplished rope jumper (like my 11 year old grandson) I’d be reluctant to make a fool out of myself in a public gym. I expect many feel that way and most gyms don’t allow access to the younger (and more accomplished) jumpers…

    in reply to: The Post Kollel Financial Crisis #1314011
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    The point has been made here repeatedly on multiple topics and in multiple contexts. The notion of a very large percentage of chareidi young men foregoing any secular education and vocational training and instead spending 10+ years shteiging while throwing their families on the welfare rolls is a true chillul hashem (overused term) and totally inconsistent with how prior generations (with exceptions for a few future gaonim) found the time to do both. These yungerleit fully know the hole they are digging for themselves and their families by rejecting all the available options today to combine secular studies and job training with their learning so the laments about making the transition after 10 years of zero effort on acquiring the skills for a paranassah cannot be taken credibly.

    in reply to: Q&A With Rav Avigdor Miller #1313894
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    I think most of us have learned that we cannot take literally all the words of chazal and more modern-day gadolim and meforshim since most commentary and psaks have a contextual element not always apparent from the quote or attribution. Generally, most are not blanket edicts or unqualified but the conditionality is often implicit rather than explicit or inferred from the facts of the question or the identify of the questioner.

    in reply to: The Kiddush Hashem of Lakewood #1313077
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    There is a misguided notion that learning and earning a parnassah are mutually exclusive. Throughout our history, with few exceptions, there have been generations of those who lived a balanced life including limudei torah, working for a parnassah and spending time relaxing with family and friends. Its only in the last generations that the notion of learning 24×7 while throwing your family on to the public welfare rolls and private charities has become the norm in some communities. Its time to go back to basics with respect to living a balanced life. Sure, maybe a small subset of brilliant talmidim might learn full-time, but 90 percent of the shteigers in BMG, et. al. are NOT brilliant learners.

    in reply to: The Kiddush Hashem of Lakewood #1312601
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Apparently, there are still ongoing investigations that could result in even more arrests in the coming weeks. The government task force investigating this fraud is now able to access confidential tax return information and use newly available software that makes it much easier to verify information and flag inconsistencies between welfare applications and other previously inaccessible information. It would ultimately be good if the prosecutors could recruit honest frum yidden from the BMG tzibur to work on these investigations since they would be able to focus on the real fraud artists and ganovim who give the 95% of the honest citizens a bad name. Maybe also provide cash awards for a “tip line” to report those who commit welfare fraud if they can figure out a way to avoid cries of “gevalt” and “moser”

    in reply to: Discouraging Making Aliyah: Satmar Rebbe in France #1311836
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Its somewhat bizarre that a Rav who cannot even get along with his own brother feels competent to give musar to the yidden in France whose own sense of security is at risk. He says nothing about how they can resolve their security issues and instead uses his comments to exploit their fears and tell them their children will go OTD if they c’v move to eretz hakodesh where there security will be substantially approved.

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    As yidden, we have a deeper obligation to support those government services critical to providing basic life-sustaining health-care services to those truly in need and who have done all within their capability to provide for themselves. At the same time, I hear you rationalize why families of learners in Lakewood with 10 children should grab all the welfare money they can (even though the parents refuse to work), you offer bogus philosophical objections to an entitlement of basic health care for those truly in need.

    in reply to: Overturn Lawrence v. Texas #1311520
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    If I understand your perspective, any behavior or communal committment explicitly addressed in the Torah is a fundamental moral imperative….everything else is a discretionary policy choice over which reasonable yidden might disagree. I guess that works for you but what about the young child of a single mother who would like to observe the mitzvah of “u’shamartem es nofshosechem” but sadly lacks the resources to provide for preventive health care. Is it the responsibility of the tzibur to provide a social safety net or simply allow for those who want to voluntarily give tzadakah to do so and if not, the child may be at risk from fatal childhood diseases.

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Adlerstein make a cogent point with respect to the risks of “endorsement’ of any website postings since there is not the same level of “quality control” as one might assume with hard copy publications. However, that simply means we apply a higher level of skepticism and due diligence to “advice” websites, Wikopedia type sites, and other forms of social media. I’m not aware that Moshe Rabenu had a Facebook pate and was liked by hundreds of thousands of yidden in the midbar and then flamed when the maan didn’t show up on time…..somehow, the rebbe was able to communicate to the world without a Twitter account by sharing pearls of wisdom, along with his aura and a dollar bill. Every generation communicates and shares information and advice differently but one common thread is that everyone ultimately is given the power of analysis and reasoning by HKBH and failure to use that power is ultimately you own fault, not that of some “Fake Virtual Posek”

    in reply to: Overturn Lawrence v. Texas #1311476
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To DaasYochid:

    Do you really believe “the market” will provide what society doesn’t value…..if adequate health care for children is not treated as a “right” (as it is in EY and most of the world outside the U.S.) and subsidized as necessary by the government, the market will NOT voluntarily provide care to those who cannot pay (we can argue why) but run in the direction of offering higher quality service at increasingly higher prices to those that can afford it. Health care is different from any other product or service in the economy. If you insist on protecting “life” in the womb as an objectively moral requirement under penalty of law (one infamous state law would have made abortion a capital crime) than you are equally obligated to treat that life with dignity and value after it emerges into the world. As a yid, you seem to be saying that unless some social value or objective can be explicitly found among taryag mitzvos, it inherently must be assigned a lower priority.

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Yes….cannot imagine how I could have confused Meno and RebYid….my apologies to whichever of you felt the greater insult

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    RebYid23

    You clearly have a viewpoint and are entitled to hold by it ….for many of us, getting input from online sources on a subject we know little about is better than making decisions with no information. Most of us feel competent to sort out the information we get online and apply the appropriate discount factors based on the qualifications of the source, how the advice conforms with other views solicited, etc. As another post commented, ANY third-party information requires one to exercise some degree of analysis prior to using that information as the basis for decisions. As to your own challenges in virtual rehab, we all wish you a refuah shelaymah.

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To Meno:
    Getting objective and non-judgmental advice on matters of halacha online when you don’t have physical or electronic access to a rav/posek with whom you’ve established a personal relationship Is a lot better than simply not getting any advice.
    To Joseph:
    My virtual wife assures me that she much prefers our electronic relationship than having to deal with me in a physical reality. Also, while Toras Moshe is “judgmental” there is no reason why a rav who professes to be knowledge about Toras Moshe must be judgemental. In fact, one of the greatest midos shared by both Rav Moshe’ Z’TL, and the Rebbe , ZTL, was how each was known for never denigrating or disparaging someone who came to them for advice. They were not shy about offering their views of what the Torah objectively required but at the same time never verbally abused a yid who professed to not having met that ideal.

    in reply to: Overturn Lawrence v. Texas #1310840
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Both the torah and our own constitution implicitly approved of slavery, albeit under conditions requiring that slaves be treated humanely. There also are provisions for one yid to summarily execute another yid without going through a judicial process for certain violations of torah law. I’m unaware that the Ebeshter provided his yidden a mechanism to amend his torah by a vote of 2/3 of the shevatim or by a 3/4 vote of the RCA membership. There are lots of things in the torah that might seem morally repugnant today but its not up to us to question. However, as long as we live in galus, we must in most cases to dina d’malchusa and cannot invoke torah law to justify actions that are strictly forbidden under civil law. I find it bizarre how many political conservatives (including some yidden) who rant and rave about outlawing any adherence to Shariah law in the U.S. but are totally quiet (or ignorant) about the degree to which frum yidden already subject themselves voluntarily to halacha, rely on a system of beis dins to adjudicate disputes, etc. Of course, we would contend there is no “moral equivalence” betweeh Shariah and Halacha but from a legal and constitutional perspective we cannot enforce a selective prohibition on ANYONE voluntarily subjecting themselves to any religious code.

    in reply to: Overturn Lawrence v. Texas #1310782
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To Daas Yochid:

    You say that “comparing [society’s] self-determined sense of morality to G-d’s is probably kefirah. Definitely idiocy.”…..Well, I guess you also would take exception to calling the “asseres hadibros” (aka the 10 commandments), the “The 10 suggestions”. If you cannot accept the fundamental moral equivalence of not taking the life of a so-called “unborn child” with the obligation to assure that the child has access to basic health-care and nutrition after birth, I would suggest its you who is the tipesh gamur. I could care less if zealots such as yourself consider such moral imperatives as ‘kefirah” but that is reality. I don’t look to torah moshe m’sinai to outline the required elements of national health care but would place a much higher priority on providing basic health care to all than legislating and regulating about what two consenting adults do in the privacy of their home or whether the government provides a piece of paper providing certain contractual rights to same gender couples.

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    What is necessary today are websites that provide non-judgmental, torah-based information to those with questions about lifestyles, education, workplace issues etc. but provide the opportunity for the individual to analyze information and decide for himself/herself their own hashkafah. The old fashioned guidance of finding one’s own local rav/posek is an ideal but often impractical in today’s world where younger people are highly mobile and don’t set down roots long enough to build such relationships. While having your own “virtual rav” would be second best, it also requires that individuals learn to think critically and decide for themselves how they want to live a torah-based life in the 21st century.

    in reply to: Overturn Lawrence v. Texas #1310506
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    I believe its “objectively immoral” to allow any child born in the U.S. to lack adequate health care or nutrition. Yet, these same Republican “moralists” insist that each state should be allowed to decide whether such an entitlement exists. What would happen in Monsey or Lakewood if the states wee allowed to cut off welfare benefits to families with more than 2 children because the parents were morally irresponsible for having children they could not feed or care for?? The scope of the selective morality and hypocrisy is breathtaking.

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    I don’t think the actual regents test scores are publicly disclosed for individual schools so it is difficult to make direct comparisons. On an anecdotal level, I’d believe the assumption that yeshiva grads from schools with good secular programs score better than public school counterparts in the same communities. However, I’d be skeptical about the test scores I some frum schools where secular classes are not given much priority.

    in reply to: Overturn Lawrence v. Texas #1310476
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Take the government (both federal and state) out of the business of regulating kedushin and bedroom behavior. The Republicans preach the gospel of individual liberty but seem to carve out exceptions for their right wing evangelical friends. Be consistent or acknowledge your hypocrisy.

    in reply to: The Kiddush Hashem of Lakewood #1309815
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To Joseph:

    Are you really serious about Lakewood being such a “Kiddush hashem”?? You are either trolling as usual or are totally oblivious to the fact that welfare is so widespread in the township that according to census data, more than half of all the children live in homes that receive some form of government assistance for the poor. There are 10,000 more children in households with married couples in Lakewood receiving food, income or state aid than Newark. Clearly, the BMG network did much to help rebuild the frum tzibur and support limud torah in the post-War period here in the U.S. However, do you really believe that Aron Kotler imagined that the frum community he helped establish and nurture would deteriorate to the point It has become the welfare capital of the state??

    in reply to: The Chillul HaShem in Lakewood #1308786
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Until the leading rabbonim in Lakewood speak out forcefully and unequivocally about these low-lifes who steal from the public (which means stealing from you and me), than the type of anti-Semitic vandalism we saw at the Jersey shul last night will proliferate. All of these “innocent until proven guilty” and “maybe they didn’t understand the law” excuses are simply another form of denial. These ganovim and their families who were complicit in this fraud, if convicted, should be publicly cut off from the Jewish community and treated like pariahs. Welcoming them back into the tzibur after they get out of prison will make them seem like conquering heros. If people know that they and their wives and children will be treated like pariahs, then maybe there would be some deterrent effect.

    in reply to: Marrying a Bas Talmid Chochom #1308724
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Avi K is right….if chazal were to opine on the issue today, they would be considerably more careful to qualify their statement so that CR readers would not take it as a blanket statement. Its intutitive that the daughter of a talmid chacham is more likely to have good midos and make a good wife and mother but everyone can probably cite examples where that is not ALWAYS the case.

    in reply to: Dead men give no hashgachos #1308086
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Lowertutition: I get your point….if there is simply a loss of confidence by the mashgiach for a variety of reasons, it might be difficult to be transparent. There are obviously going to be subjective determinations in hashgacha where thee might not always be a “smoking gun”. However, my concern is that in some communities with only one hashgacha or vaad, a purely personal matter can literally destroy a business overnight. Self-monitoring would not be a viable alternative where hashgacha is withdrawn arbitrarily.

    in reply to: Shidduchim Stigma’s isn’t the way to go. #1307530
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Perhaps its time to place less empahasis on shiduchim and focus more on allowing our young men and women to meet and get to know one another without all the stress and pressures of the current system where parents, grandparents, family and friends create a sense of near-hysteria if a date for kiddushin is not fixed within a short time of the first date. There is no “shidduch crisis”; there is cultural crisis where we push marriage on children not ready of marriage and make them feel like damaged goods (especially the girls) if they c’v reach the age of 20 w/o a chooson and baby carriage. In the context of young men and women with some physical illness or emotional disability, they have every obligation to be transparent as to their condition, even if it means taking longer to find their beschert. To do otherwise is deceitful and more likely than not to result in a breakup of the marriage or serious marital disfunction.

    in reply to: Dead men give no hashgachos #1307516
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    In matters like this particular incident, and many others, confidence in hashgacha in general would be enhanced if the parties would stop using “code words” for the underlying issue and be more transparent. Absent some legal constraint (e.g. allegations of criminal activity under investigation where the authorities have requested that information be withheld) or important matter of personal privacy, providing the real reason why a hashgacha is being suspended or withdrawn should be the rule, not the exception. If yidden have patronized a restaurant or market or purchased a product for a period of time based in part on the hashgacaha, they are entitled to know why it suddenly is no longer applicable. If a product, should they worry about having to kasher and toivel their entire kitchen?

    in reply to: Dead men give no hashgachos #1307463
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    In today’s world, any mark or symbol of “hasgacha” has great commercial value since it conveys the sense that the product is produced under higher standards, with higher quality ingredients, etc. In some respects, its a second tier version of “organic” or “natural”. You can credit this to a few brands such as Hebrew National (whose hashgacha gets low grades here on YWN) because of their national TV marketing about “we report to a higher authority”. There are various studies, but some estimates indicate that more than 2/3 of the market for specialty kosher products are purchased by goyim for the reasons noted above, This does not include such generic products as nationally marketed baked goods, breakfast cereals, canned tuna fish, etc who have a kosher certification.

    in reply to: Government Jobs #1307444
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    OPM data shows that there are thousands of federal employees “fired” annually for a variety of reasons ranging from poor performance to violation of ethics rules or simple workplace issues such as threats of violence, theft, etc. Yes, its more difficult than in the private sector but it was meant to be so that a new administration could not arbitrarily create some “trumped up” excuse (bad pun) to fire those whose politics they disagree with. Every democratic government in the industrialized world has a career, non-political government workforce.

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To “rational jew”

    You didn’t get the memo…at least for the past few days, the Trumpkopf-in-Chief has been listening to his lawyers and calling it an interim suspension of visa issuances to residents of high risk countries” rather than a “Muslim Ban”. If he reverts back to his old language, even the Supreme Court will tell him to go back to Mar a Lago and take a cold shower. Logical security safeguards are essential; those based on optics or nominal association with a religious belief will never pass muster here in the U.S. or Europe.

    in reply to: Marrying a Bas Talmid Chochom #1306624
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To Dass Yochid: That may be a better way of saying it…every rule of general applicability still has some exceptions….especially when it comes to people.

    in reply to: Marrying a Bas Talmid Chochom #1306289
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To Joseph:

    You ask “You’re saying Chazal are wrong? ..”

    Answer is they can be wrong in some cases…..it is beyond foolish to believe that Chazal meant this in ALL cases. Obviously there are exceptions where a bas talmid chochom goes OTD, has personality issues, or any of a dozen good reasons why in a particular case she would NOT be a good choice as a wife. Obviously, most cases one would expect a bas talmid chochom to be someone with wonderful midos, etc. but nothing I 100 percent

    in reply to: Government Jobs #1305654
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    There is a centralized job listing website managed by OPM for most federal agencies (except for certain SES jobs, and excepted service jobs along with schedule C political slots) ….the hiring process has gotten somewhat better but still plan on at least 3 or 4 months and sometimes 6 months to a year. There are hiring preferences for veterans that trump (excuse the expression) merit based hiring decisions.

    in reply to: Kosher Sushi ✡️ 🍣 #1304844
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Assuming most YWN readers are not pregnant, there is no reason you cannot eat fresh fish once a week without worrying about mercury et. al. You fail to mention the cardiac benefits of fish along with the protein and absence of material amounts of bad fats. Like anything else, with moderation its fine. If you are going to eat fish once or twice a week, much better fresh than canned. Substantially more people get sick from poorly handled and prepared chicken than fish according to the CDC. If you know a commercial insurance broker, just ask if a sushi restaurant would pay a higher premium to cover potential customer claims versus a pizza restaurant or chicken rotisserie takeout.

    in reply to: Kosher Sushi ✡️ 🍣 #1304626
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To lowerourtuition1121

    With regard to an expensive steak, properly “cooked” does not mean well done….you can find a better valued piece of leather at the shoe store. Most of the top restaurants won’t even accept orders for a “well done” steak. As to the price of canned tuna versus fresh tuna, most of us don’t purchase food for our families based on finding the cheapest option available, unless of course, that’s also “your preference”. For a casual lunch sandwich perhaps but who would choose canned tuna for a dinner when fresh is readily available. If you live in the boonies where fresh fish is not available, than of course you are right.

    in reply to: Kosher Sushi ✡️ 🍣 #1304565
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    With fresh tuna so readily available in most cities (especially the NYC metro area) its hard to understand why anyone would eat cooked tuna from a can, frequently packed in oil. I guess its the same mindless gourmands who pay $40 or $50 for a good steak and then mindlessly ask that it be served “well-done”.

    in reply to: Kosher Sushi ✡️ 🍣 #1304328
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    It seems everyone agrees that food preferences were NOT dictated via torah moshe m’sinai nor does the very limited (and grossly unhealthy) pantry of food choices available to yidden in the Alte Heim 75 or 100 years ago have any relevance to what we choose to eat today based on having access to an almost unlimited set of choices that provide much greater nutrition, are healthier and satisfy even the kashruth requirements of the “mega machmir” crowd. Of course, every segment of the tzibur and every family may have its own minhagim which may guide their menus, especially for Shabbos and yom tovim, but otherwise there really are no limits (other than kashruth) for a frum yid today living in any large metropolitan area. Also, today, there are many more families where men share in the cooking with their wives so that introduces a totally separate range of food choices and preparation options. Finally, it was not that easy in the Alte Heim to push a few buttons on your iPhone and have your chulent delivered to your door within 30 minutes. It took that long to walk down the street to the rebbe’s house with a chicken you were fortunate enough to have for Shabbos but about which you had a sheilah.

    in reply to: Kosher Sushi ✡️ 🍣 #1303880
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To Joseph:

    Now we know you are a troll?? The Ebeshter gives us fresh fish as a great source of protein and fresh flavors of the sea; Chazal bring down that he did not intend for his creation to become a condiment for Hungarians to serve sugar etc.

    in reply to: Kosher Sushi ✡️ 🍣 #1303837
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Most good sushi bars (kosher or otherwise) will not serve that yucky fake shrimp stuff made from ground up and processed trash fish. Sushi and sashimi are the prime example where “less is more”. Fresh fish with minimal handling and simple presentation are the best and raise the fewest issues of kashruth. The more “stuff” you add to sushi rolls (an entirely American meshugaas) to make them more attractive to the less adventuresome palettes in the market (aka its not schmaltz herring or zeese Ungareshe gefilte fish), the more issues the mashgiach has to focus on and the less tasteful the outcome.

    in reply to: Marrying a Bas Talmid Chochom #1303757
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    There is probably a rather old but reliable metric in considering a potential kallah….does she (herself) act in accordance with daas torah….do her midos and demeanor reflect the family’s yichus….and MOST importantly, does she show she cares for and cherishes her potential chassan and look forward to building together with him bayin ne’eman b’yisroel.

    in reply to: Are Rebbeim getting paid enough? #1303745
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    The same proliferation of educators was a problem in the public sector in the 80’s and 90’s where kids who had no clue what they wanted to do when they graduated college became “education” majors. The teacher pipeline was flooded with mediocre teaching grads and compensation was flat or went down. Only when other lines of work became more attractive did the pipeline slow and the laws of supply/demand pushed up salaries (along with powerful teachers’ unions in some states). For a kollel yungerleit who wants to study full time for several years and then go out and work to start a family, chinuch is likely the only real option in many areas, given their lack of secular job skills. Its not clear the really top student want to go into chinuch. Most prefer to stay and learn 24×7 and in some cases, will find financial sponsors if they are truly the top 1 percent. Most roshei yeshivos do not have programs to systematically evaluate their yungerleit to determine which ones will make the best teachers. A top learner is not necessarily a top teacher.

    in reply to: Kosher Sushi ✡️ 🍣 #1303685
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    The Sushi Tokyo location in 5T…..even better than the original location in Brooklyn. Service is a bit uneven (but with one or two exceptions, that seems to be the norm in most Kosher restaurants). Fish quality is excellent and turnover is high so freshness is not a concern.

    in reply to: Government Jobs #1303447
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    While  Trump and his chevrah run around disparaging government employees and “unelected bureacrats” and using them to scapegoat all of the government’s problems, the vast majority are dedicated workers who have a public service ethic and really are committed to their work. Studies show that compensation is slightly above market at the lower wage levels but substantially below market at the higher levels where most government employees could be earning substantially more for doing equivalent work in the private sector. While there needs to be more efficient hiring and firing practices, the system overall works reasonably well. Also, the number of federal employees is actually lower today than 20 years ago, notwithstanding an enormous increase in federal agency responsibilities. If anyone thinks it would be cheaper to hire a private contractor to do the work of a Department of Defense analyst, just look at the few studies that have examined so called “outsourcing” programs.

    in reply to: Are Rebbeim getting paid enough? #1303309
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    The most talented rabbeim will find their ways in to the top yeshivot where the compensation is higher. Chinuch is a free market. No one forces a Rav to teach for a non-compensatory wage. He can move on to another school if he feels he is not earning enough for his family. This is not a unique problem Public school teachers are also complaining that society doesn’t value their work correctly and in some cities, the trash collectors earn more than the teachers.

    in reply to: Court ruling against El Al #1303302
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    If there are lots of empty seats, than asking a woman to voluntarily relocate to a comparable seat across the aisle or a row or two back is obviously not a big deal. However, the burden should be on the man who doesn’t want to sit next to a woman to relocate, NOT the woman. In any event, its NEVER ok to require a woman change seats if she doesn’t want to move, unless its a matter of security.

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