SJSinNYC

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Viewing 50 posts - 51 through 100 (of 3,353 total)
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  • SJSinNYC
    Member

    manohman,

    Are you really trying to say that the “right” is more accepting than the left? HAHA

    And I love how safety concerns are a “problem” of the left wing. Do you know why those were implemented? Granted, I don’t agree with the entire “left” either, but as a general rule, the “left” is more accepting than the “right.”


    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Adorable, one of my critique of Charedi society in general is that they ask for tolerance from the “left” but don’t grant it themselves.

    Most people to the “left” are more likely to accept the “right”‘s right to live as they choose. Notice the “left” aren’t doing things like posting signs to alter people’s dress, whereas the “right” does. The “left” generally has a live and let live attitude. The “right” does not.


    SJSinNYC
    Member

    So I guess I’m an anti-semite right? (insert eye roll emoticon)


    SJSinNYC
    Member

    In a private domain (like a shul), I have no problem.

    In the street, I find it ridiculous. BP is not owned by Charedi Jews. I will adhere to my own tznius obligations, not someone elses.


    SJSinNYC
    Member

    When a newspaper distorts photographs, it means they are changing the version of history. How can you trust anything they write?

    What I want to know is if there is nothing wrong with altering women out of photographs, then why would it be a chillul Hashem when people find out?

    in reply to: ???? on women. Not trolling this time. #766059

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    LOL GAW

    Popa, I don’t think Ralbag was a misogynist. But he was influenced by his surrounding. Women weren’t educated in his generation and as such were ignorant in many ways. And yes, its likely that his feeling of superiority over women stems from that.

    You can’t really compare certain aspects of thought/philosophy to today.

    in reply to: ???? on women. Not trolling this time. #766040

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    All Torah Scholars were affected by the philosophy of their generations.

    in reply to: Not Looking For A Psak, Just An Opinion #770236

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    No not really.

    She couldn’t come visit on Shabbos. If she were already there, it may be different.

    She couldn’t come Shabbos morning just to say hello. She couldn’t come Shabbos afternoon to play with her nieces. She couldn’t come over to see if my sister wanted to go for a walk at any point on Shabbos.

    But yes, if she were there before Shabbos, my sister wouldn’t have to kick her out.

    in reply to: Not Looking For A Psak, Just An Opinion #770234

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    DY,

    I know the entire story. That was it. My sister was not supposed to invite our other sister because she uses the eruv, whether or not she would carry to come.

    I guess theoretically if she showed up before Shabbos, she could come for Friday night dinner.

    The Rabbi felt there was absolutely no way to allow the Brooklyn Eruv so he forbid inviting people who did use it.

    in reply to: Not Looking For A Psak, Just An Opinion #770230

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Yes DY.

    in reply to: Food Processors= Help!!!!!! #764597

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    I use a 12 cup Kitchen Aid and I’m really happy with it.

    in reply to: Not Looking For A Psak, Just An Opinion #770228

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    DY,

    If it were that they should ask guests who use the eruv not to carry when coming to them it would be a different story.

    If this had affected me, I would have been super upset and it probably would have destroyed my relationship with my sister. As it was, I felt terrible for my other sister.

    But then again, that’s exactly what Wolf and GAW were discussing.

    in reply to: Not Looking For A Psak, Just An Opinion #770226

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Wolf and GAW,

    When I lived in Brooklyn, my BIL and sister’s Rabbi told them they were not allowed to invite guests who used the eruv (even if their Rabbi told them it was mutar). It didn’t affect me because I was in the same building as my sister and we had an eruv chatzeros anyway, but my other sister lived across the street and was affected.

    So yes, it does happen.

    in reply to: How To Raise A Boy? Whats It All about? #765145

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Just raise him to be a good human being, the same way you are trying with a girl.

    You don’t need to do anything gender specific really, just personality specific.

    in reply to: Second Marriages & Hadlokas Neiros #845277

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    bbubbee, I can only speak for the people I know, but no they did not add for their new husband’s children.

    in reply to: Not Looking For A Psak, Just An Opinion #770188

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Unless it was an emergency, I wouldn’t do it.

    in reply to: Getting Married & Trying To Decide To Have TV Or Not #764364

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Mindovermatter, we may all have the same Torah, but we all get different piskei halacha from our Rabbonim. The halachic process allows for a lot of variety in interpretation.

    As I’ve said in the past, I don’t name my Rabbi online. He is NOT a pulpit Rabbi and has chosen to be private. Its not up to me to reveal it. You are welcome to trust me or not, that’s up to you.

    DY, truthfully, I wonder if “kosher” sites are often more of a problem. You get lulled into a false sense of its kashrus and end up reading lashon hara and other negative information. I have to remind myself sometimes that:

    1) The internet attracts a lot of crazy people

    2) People feel like they can insult others because they are anonymous

    3) One person (or even a few people) online rarely represent their “kind” of people

    4) Some people are just trolls

    Again, I have no problem with people restricting their TV usage. Hey, I told the OP that I recommended not getting one. But in all honesty, I think the internet is a much bigger problem than TV. Even filtered.

    in reply to: Kosher vendors at Yankee Stadium? #770644

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Yankee Stadium. It was totally awesome and I got to witness the Yankees beat the Braves in 1999.

    in reply to: Getting Married & Trying To Decide To Have TV Or Not #764354

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    DY,

    I’m not saying that we have the same standard, but that you do allow some things in your home.

    And actually, its very easy to make sure my kids don’t watch TV – our cable box has a card in it. Remove the card and nothing is accessible. Take the card with you.

    Filtered internet can actually let in some inappropriate content. How do I know? We recently added filtering because I was getting some ridiculous popup with internet explorer (my husband uses Opera, so no problems LOL) and some things still come through.

    I acknowledge that your rabbonim have assured TV, but mine have not. Therefore, it is kosher for me.

    Anyway, this is way off the point of the OP 🙂


    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Did anyone ask him if this is what he meant?

    in reply to: Kosher vendors at Yankee Stadium? #770633

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    I used to work at the kosher hot dog stand!

    in reply to: Getting Married & Trying To Decide To Have TV Or Not #764348

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    DY,

    I’m going to assume that with your sarcasm you understood my point. And hey, even you admitted you do allow some secular media in your home (pre-screened books).

    As kids get older, they dictate more and more where their chinuch is. Now of course, there are absolute limits, but every parent knows that some kids need different boundaries. You may allow some children to read more secular books than others. You may allow your child at some point to eat a hechsher which while technically kosher is not something you buy for your home.

    This issue is neither black nor white. But letting my son watch Mickey Mouse vs reading the book is virtually the same (and I mean that literally – they right the Mickey Mouse Clubhouse books in the same format) is not harming his spiritual health. [Which is not to say you are doing anything wrong by not allowing your kids to]

    in reply to: Suggesting Shidduch for………yourself?! #913809

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    My ultra-yeshivish neighbor met her husband while she was in seminary in Israel.

    I don’t remember the whole backstory (it was kosher), but they are happily married for 15+ years. She came home for Pesach and told her parents she was ready to get married to this guy.

    in reply to: Getting Married & Trying To Decide To Have TV Or Not #764339

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    DY,

    In general, in Chinuch you have to strike a balance. Sometimes, its better to expose your kids moderately then have them exposed some other way. Knowledge is power and that’s different for every child. Some children do better totally isolated. Some do worse.

    Mod80, I’ve been to plenty of bars and was not surrounded by debauchery. Its a matter of knowing which ones and going at the right (or “wrong” LOL) times. My office does Happy Hour rather frequently and let me tell you that at 5 pm, most bars are filled with men and women in their business suits having a beer or two.

    in reply to: Getting Married & Trying To Decide To Have TV Or Not #764308

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    DY, you have television capability but have it disabled. Like Ned Flanders 🙂

    Weighing in on the kids from no-tv homes watching – my friends who didn’t have TVs came over and obsessively watched shows I would NEVER have watched, but their overall volume of TV was less. Friends with TVs came over to hang out more rather than watch TV.

    in reply to: Resume #763804

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Unless you have a long track record, keep your resume to 1 page.

    I reject a lot of resumes because they are long, drawn out and have little substance. No one cares if you were a dog walker at age 12.

    in reply to: Camp Sternberg Dress Code #764054

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Wow, things have changed since I was there!


    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Don’t feed the troll.

    in reply to: Do u have a deep dark secret? #767777

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Jewish Unity,

    I self edited. It was a joke. I just wrote EDITED instead of an actual secret.

    I thought Mod80 would get a kick out of it.

    in reply to: Diamond Wedding Rings #763466

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    shlishi, women wore white on Tu B’Av.

    in reply to: Getting Married & Trying To Decide To Have TV Or Not #764299

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Spoiler,

    This is really a personal preference thing. You don’t need to think long term – you can start in the short term.

    I lived without a TV for a few years and its really not a big deal. I view a TV as a nice to have (we have one now).

    Are you going to have internet at home? If so, you have a TV.

    Your first year of marriage should NOT be boring 🙂 If you are having adjustments to marriage, you should be proactively working on them. There are plenty of things to do so you won’t be bored.

    Either way is fine though. Good luck with your decision.

    in reply to: best of both worlds? #763164

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Why is it unheard of for a girl to be a stay at home mom?

    Tuition generally requires 2 working parents.

    in reply to: best of both worlds? #763157

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Interesting that engineers are being lumped in with Doctors and Lawyers (when engineering salaries are much closer to accountants and take the same or less schooling).

    I know plenty of intellectual learners who are engineers, doctors and lawyers. Perhaps you are looking in the wrong places? (most are married now though)

    in reply to: Yom Hashoah…why do charaidim/right wing orthodox not "celebrate"? #762655

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    I never said people SHOULD observe Yom Hashoah, just explaining a bit why it was pulled out.

    No one thinks Yom Hashoah has a specific religious significance. Its a day of commemoration. It doesn’t take anything away from Tisha B’Av and no one I know who observes Yom Hashoah observes Tisha B’Av differently because of it.

    DY, perhaps things have changed, but my RW school didn’t discuss the Holocaust very often and certainly less than once a year. I was exposed to it greatly from my grandparents, relatives, books, trips to Yad Vashem etc. My camp didn’t really do much either.

    I do wonder if the reluctance of the RW/Charedi camp has more to do with politics than hashkafa. (Although, we could debate on how different they are, but different tangent really)

    in reply to: too yeshivish #762879

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    “too yeshivish” (or “too anything”) can be a negative.

    Sometimes, people miss the forest for the trees. This often happens to younger people who are still solidifying their hashkafa.

    in reply to: Yom Hashoah…why do charaidim/right wing orthodox not "celebrate"? #762649

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    I believe the difference is how fresh the Holocaust is.

    Mourning the Bais Hamikdash is a different type of mourning than the Holocaust. Hearing stories from survivors and passing on direct information is different than reading kinos.

    I think its also a comfort to survivors and their decendants.

    in reply to: Job Interview/Shave/Omer/Beard #762727

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Will your beard be a real beard? Or will it look like a bad version of 5 oclock shadow?

    in reply to: Do u have a deep dark secret? #767751

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Yes. Here it is:

    EDITED

    in reply to: Boro Park Eruv #761301

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    I used to be mainly a “pocket carrier” (all I needed was really a key or random item), but since having kids its pretty obvious with a stroller or baby carrier.

    Popa, what you said about “MO Rabbonim” can be said about every sect of Judaism.

    I asked a shaila when I moved to Brooklyn and I follow it. In general, its a lot easier for men not to carry in Brooklyn than women.

    in reply to: 1 MILLION FRUM JEWS IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK #760595

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    what kind of people are you considering frum? Just people who keep Shabbos???

    What’s wrong with using that as your major criteria?

    There is no person who observes mitzvos 100%. Everyone has their weakness. So there is really no “frum” if you look for 100%.

    Generally, “frum” requires shabbos, kashrus and THM/mikvah.

    What would your criteria be?

    in reply to: marrying an only child #762218

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Hashem grants children – there is no amount of trying or preventing that wil stop Hashem.

    in reply to: who are you #760105

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Reminds me of “We” by Ayn Rand.

    in reply to: whats it take to get a screename subtitle? #759361

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Thanks for changing my subtitle. I hope its sincere and not ironic 🙂

    in reply to: anyone going to isreal soon or to Teaneck b4 sunday? #759313

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Can you get them to Manhattan today? I’ll take them back to Teaneck and deliver them.

    If so, the mods can give you my email address.

    in reply to: very funny shidduch story #762275

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Popa,

    When my husband was commuting from Brooklyn to NJ, we talked about bridge vs tunnel. It would have saved us a lot of money but at that time of day would have added on at least 45 minutes. His commute was already between 3-4 hours. He paid for the tunnel!

    One time we decided to take the bridge since there was no traffic. That was the time someone rear-ended us :-/ Sign from Hashem – take the tunnel.

    If I were the guy I would have made up some stuff about yichud issues with tunnels 🙂

    in reply to: Basic english #759120

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Let’s start with Talmud Bavli – not written in lashon hakodesh.

    Do you think its important to learn Gemara?

    in reply to: The Bernstain Bears and Too Much Pesach Vacation #759380

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    While I sort of agree with aries (complaining about the teachers is the wrong way to go), I also think yogi’s attitude is ridiculous.

    Yes, parents expect teachers to teach their children regardless of distractions. A good teacher will harness the energy of the students into something productive.

    No kid is really thinking “I want to help Mommy clean the toilets.” They are thinking “Yay another day off from school!”

    And yes, plenty of jobs are really 24 hours a day. I get called all the time at home, on my cell phone etc to deal with issues. I work for a company that runs 24/7/365.

    I don’t buy the argument that teachers have it so tough. I have a lot of friends who are teachers and they’ve told me that after the first couple of years, its rather easy. The base of the curriculum is pretty set, you have good experience to guide you and its rewarding. Time off is good too.

    GAW, no complaints from me LOL. I’m not a union employee. They have their benefits and drawbacks.

    in reply to: Basic english #759113

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    I became an engineer to avoid needing proper grammar and spelling skills 🙂

    in reply to: How to remain neutral with the boys in college #758847

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    If a girl knows she will be marrying a worker, not learner, than you would be maskim she should not go to college?

    Its important for both spouses to have the possibility of a liveable wage.

    My father got very ill when I was a few years old. My mother went back to work – her health care is what kept my family from going bankrupt. Then, when he died, it meant there was food on the table.

    in reply to: ???? ???? ???? Extreme Chumros #760539

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    Not using soap is a minhag shtus IMO. For many reasons.

    I don’t quite understand why many Lubavitch won’t use lettuce products but will still use Romaine for the sedarim.

Viewing 50 posts - 51 through 100 (of 3,353 total)


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