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    ooking for the zivug that is best for your child, irrespective of whether the age-difference is 6 months or 20-40 years.

    That adds a whole new dimension to grandparents suggesting shidduchim! I can hear the calls coming in now, “So, Dovid’l, as soon as your Roizy gets back from the seminary plane I vant her to come right down to Boca and meet my neighbor Alter Chaim who nebach just lost his vife a few years ago. She vould be poyfect for him!”

    in reply to: OK, MODs – Do You Really Want To Know What Mommy Called Me? #782334

    veteran
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    Health is exactly right. My mother says that all the time.

    in reply to: slow down- you move too fast #782023

    veteran
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    I saw no difference


    veteran
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    the point is not to just get people married off, but to get them happily married off.

    And as of now, “happy” marriages are legal in NYS.

    in reply to: Should The Wife Have Total Control Of The Home Internet? #973331

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    klach aitzel moireh

    in reply to: Getting Rid of the Status of Moser #780508

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    DaasYochid

    I believe it’s an exact quote. I do not believe that it applies here.

    Count ’em yourself.

    in reply to: Flatbush- why are the streets so empty after dark? #780447

    veteran
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    @Wolf- point taken. Yet you cannot deny that it was a very Wolfish response on my part. The fact that you chose to overlook the opportunity to misunderstand OfCourse’s question is worth a thought.

    in reply to: Getting Rid of the Status of Moser #780506

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    It is not an exact quote, and the Rambam says it does apply. Two strikes. Open up a hilchos chovel umazik perek 8.

    in reply to: Kohen Godol and Chalitza #780251

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    Pardon me. What I meant was that the chiddush is because you might think he is aino btoras. As you said, Wolf and gavra answered it clearly.

    in reply to: Kohen Godol and Chalitza #780243

    veteran
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    Because he is “aino btoras yibbum”.

    in reply to: are ur posts reflected by ur mood #780206

    veteran
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    Real men don’t have moods.

    in reply to: Getting Rid of the Status of Moser #780487

    veteran
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    Wolfish-

    What klach said is a paraphrase of the Rambam’s endorsement of killing a moiser. It means “whoever kills him first gets the merit”.

    in reply to: Flatbush- why are the streets so empty after dark? #780441

    veteran
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    WolfishMusings

    The Wolf

    Wolf, have u been drinking today?

    Absolutely not. I don’t drink.

    So how do you stay hydrated? Intravenously?

    in reply to: THREAD REMOVED WITH NO WARNING OR ANYTHING! #780133

    veteran
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    Your user name seems to say a lot about your opinion on jewish music on its own.

    in reply to: Getting Rid of the Status of Moser #780480

    veteran
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    Why do you think they even got a ticket? When police are summoned to get involved in a “disturbance of the peace” such as loud music or crowds gathering on local streets they generally do not give tickets. If someone resists it can lead to arrest, but I’ve never heard of giving tickets to solve the problem. So you didn’t cause him a financial loss and you are not a moiser.

    in reply to: AC Split Unit?!? #779916

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    I think you are talking about the ductless wall units. They’ve been around quite a while, but I have noticed them gaining popularity recently.

    I have a pair of them. There are quite a few advantages: It is almost completely silent since (like central AC) the compressor is outdoors away from the windows, unlike noisy window AC units. A relatively small indoor unit cools a very large area, since (almost) everything depends on the size of the outdoor compressor. It does not block up a window. Leaving it installed over the winter will not create a freezing draft. Compared to central, it is a lot cheaper to install because there is no need for duct work, and it is a better option if you don’t want to give up space for installing ducts for the same reason.

    It is also quite a bit more energy efficient than a window unit, with the EER running in the area of 14 as compared to window units that max out at around 10 or 11. (EER is the ratio of BTU over wattage, e.g. a 10,000 BTU that draws 1,000 watts has an EER of 10. You can find this information on the side sticker).

    Disadvantages that I am aware of are 1) the cost of purchase and installation, which is more than buying a number of individual window units and 2) I find that they do not operate as effectively when turned on and off – it works best when left on thermostat 24/7. This makes operation more costly than window units which I was accustomed to turning off when not using the room.

    Overall I give them thumbs up. If you have any other questions I will try to answer them.

    in reply to: GOP debate #779929

    veteran
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    The DNC, without a doubt

    in reply to: The Riddle Thread…. #1069723

    veteran
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    What in the world is spud pudding?

    in reply to: Password Security #779384

    veteran
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    Get an IronKey and store your password manager on it. Wherever you go you will have all your passwords in your pocket. If you ever lose it, the drive will self-destruct.

    in reply to: If I won the Lottery… #779203

    veteran
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    I missed your second point – the publicized jackpot amount in the US is the sum of the annuity payments. If we publicized the actual cash value instead nothing would change except that we would have lower jackpot amounts on the ads.

    in reply to: If I won the Lottery… #779202

    veteran
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    minyan gal- I agree with you that taxing the winnings seems unjust. The tickets are purchased with after tax dollars and a portion of the ticket price is taken by taxing authorities (supposedly to fund education, but that’s probably as true as saying FICA funds social security) so that only about half is factored into the jackpot calculation. I think it is an inconsistency in the tax code to also tax the winnings.

    I guess that there is no demand for “fair play” since it is considered gambling winnings. Why should we be fair to degenerates?

    in reply to: Worst Joke Contest #1004617

    veteran
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    This horrible joke is a real winner with the 4-6 year old crowd:

    A: Knock-knock

    B: Who’s there

    A: Interrupting Cow

    B: Interrupting co…..

    A: Mooooooooooooooo

    in reply to: The Riddle Thread…. #1069713

    veteran
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    Esteemed Mod-

    Is in not likely that in Riddle World there are some narrators who always lie?

    Even if we assume the narrator is completely objective and truthful, what evidence do we have against the maid? I would argue that her lie points to the state of her mind affected by the tragic news and not to habitual lying. I would guess that upon investigation her true alibi will be discovered. On the other hand, the butler and the cook displayed shocking coolness under the circumstances. The callousness could indicate premeditation or the fact that they are habitual liars.

    Everyone knows that the butler always did it, so it makes sense that he would be unaffected by the murder- much like a homicide detective is completely desensitized. Thus, the cook is the most likely culprit.

    in reply to: The Riddle Thread…. #1069708

    veteran
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    A family lives in a round house, they leave there daughter there alone one day, and shes murdered. Working at the house is the butler, the maid, and the chef. The family asks the chef “did you kill the daughter?” He said “no, i was preparing dinner”. They asked the butler “did you kill the daughter?” he said “No, i was hanging up the coats on the coatrack.” They asked the maid “did you kill the daughter?” she said “no, i was in the corner reading a book.”

    Who killed the daughter?

    We don’t know who killed the daughter. All we know is that the maid is a liar. In fact, I bet no one killed the daughter – the narrator is probably a liar too. And once we determined that the narrator is a liar, there is no reason to believe that the house is round, either.

    I can’t believe I didn’t visit this thread before!

    in reply to: Day Camp/Sleep-away Camp Tuition #981729

    veteran
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    “Hello elicpa,

    Are you new here? (relation to the famed eclipse?) “

    Haha- I also made the mistake of reading his name as eclipse. I am slightly dyslexic. The name is (I believe) Eli CPA, which has nothing to do with an eclipse.

    Are you also dyslexic? It would be good to get diagnosed now, so that if you have problems reading in 2nd grade you will be able to deal with them.

    in reply to: SMILE CLUB :) #1100205

    veteran
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    “I only smile when I’m standing on my head”

    in reply to: things to do in Israel #779302

    veteran
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    The Grand Canyon? I always wanted to see it! I didn’t know that they have it in Israel now, I’m much happier going to see it there than in Mormon country.

    in reply to: The Riddle Thread…. #1069690

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    binahyeseira-

    my brain has no clue what pi is

    Pi is a number between 3 and 4. A convenient number, but just a number.

    so first question that comes to my brain is what does pencils falling on a table have to do with pi.

    You know that a circle’s circumference is 2*r*pi. You also know that a full circle has 360 degrees. Putting the two together, you get a convenient way to measure angles without using degrees called radians. Mathematicians use radians instead of degrees as a way of further alienating the non-mathematical population. Also because it can be more convenient.

    A full circle has 360 degrees and 2*pi radians. If you want to say 90 degrees in radians, it would be pi /2 (because 90 is 1/4 of 360). Now you know how any problem that involves angles involves pi.

    in reply to: Encryption A Simple But Practically Unbreakable Trick #792524

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    “The effort to crack Enigma had two prongs – the Bletchley Park computers were working to decrypt it, and others were trying to capture a machine intact. Both groups succeeded. Polish codebreakers actually get the credit for first cracking Enigma.”

    The Polish codebreaking is an interesting story, and I believe (IMHO) it is also the origin of the term of “doing something the Polish way”.

    Poland was anticipating an invasion by the Nazis and was therefore extremely motivated to crack their coded messages (more so than England and other countries who were also working on it at the time but were not in imminent danger of invasion yet). They set up teams to crack the Enigma code, and succeeded initially. The irony is that the supervisor of the code breaking team had a copy of the book containing the daily “keys” but did not let anyone know. He felt that if he let it be known that he had the code book the code breakers would not learn how to crack the code and he needed them to learn those skills just in case his spy stopped providing the keys.

    Sure enough, the source dried up and breaking the Enigma code was only possible through the brute force method. Unfortunately, this happened at the same time that the Germans increased the difficulty of the Enigma encryption (out of paranoia) and the code breakers were unsuccessful from that point on.

    (As told by Simon Singh)

    in reply to: Chumras #792656

    veteran
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    “Don’t confuse chumras with OCD. “

    OCD = Obsessive Chumra Definitions

    The two are one and the same.

    in reply to: Chumras #792655

    veteran
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    1. Availability of inappropriate materials, e.g. an unfiltered internet connection as well as certain books, magazines, and newspapers.

    2. Loitering in a public space that is often used (especially by younger boys and girls) as a meeting place or hang-out. Your presence may make you seem approachable.

    in reply to: Ywn on Firefox #784661

    veteran
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    Either disable AdBlock or add a filter to your list to exempt YWN.

    in reply to: Do They Know Too Much? #811447

    veteran
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    …or anyone who has access to Google. I realize that somewhat limits things, but not as much as you may think.

    in reply to: Barnes and Nobles #778638

    veteran
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    Nobles? Is that a yeshivish bookstore?

    in reply to: Im Going Into…. #778522

    veteran
    Member

    Proof positive- a principal would spell it correctly.

    in reply to: have a grrrrr8 shabbos!! #777724

    veteran
    Member

    “What is the purpose of this thread?”

    To remind her parents to get Frosted Flakes for “shabbos cereal” this week.

    in reply to: Re Female Only Job Ads In Frum Community #777557

    veteran
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    gaw- there are size exemptions to the EEOC laws. Small offices may be allowed to do this legally. Larger offices and businesses would be breaking the law unless there is a business reason to do so (e.g. your business provides surrogate mothers- men need not apply for that position).

    in reply to: Who wants to be a Tzadaikes like Rus? #1180139

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    coffee addict-

    Thank you and kol hakavod to you. You are a worthy opponent, zein gebentched.

    in reply to: Business travel #776516

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    shlishi-

    An example of maaras eyin is serving a parve cheeseburger in your home, without placing proof of its parve status on the table. Walking into a treife roadside store is not, since it is well known that there are acceptable reasons to do so (e.g. use the restrooms, purchase a fountain soda/coffee perhaps). Note that I mention roadside as a way of avoiding the issue of a formal restaurant that probably would not allow such use of its premises.

    in reply to: Who wants to be a Tzadaikes like Rus? #1180121

    veteran
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    “we also know that Yisro was an adviser to Pharoh even before Moshe was born “

    This further hurts your credibility. If anything, it shows that Yisro married when he was quite old and presumably to a young (child-bearing age) woman. Similar to Moshe/Tzipporah and just about every other marriage in the Torah.

    in reply to: Who wants to be a Tzadaikes like Rus? #1180120

    veteran
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    I am aware of a gemara that puts Levi at age 13 at the time of the maaseh Shechem, but I would ask you to cite a source that puts Dinah at age 3. If you will recall, at the time of the incident where Yaacov met Eisav, his youngest son (Yosef) was 6-7 years old (we know this because Binyomin was in utero). Dinah was older than Yosef [as we know from Chumash, where Leah prayed for her 7th pregnancy not to result in a son since that would shame her sister Rachel]. Hence, according to any opinion, Dinah would have to have been a minimum of 8 at the time.

    In any case, combining the two opinions would present a serious difficulty. If you will take the opinion that she was 3 (pending citation of a valid source for that) you will not be able to claim that Osnas was born of that union. Correct me if I am wrong.

    As far as Tzipporah, I have no proof one way or another. But the account given lends itself to the assumption that she was not as old as Moshe (nearly 80). Aside from the way we are told about them as “daughters” indicating their youth, the fact no meforshim remark on her bearing children as miraculous indicates that it was ordinary (i.e. not an 80 year old woman). Beyond that, I will hark to Wolf who believes the burden of proof rests on you.

    Just out of curiosity, what gave you the idea to randomly choose these two marriages as close in age? You don’t seem to have any proof, and there is also no obvious reason to think it was so. If you were looking for examples (other than the one I presented jokingly) you could have gone with the meforshim who say the shevotim married their own twins.


    veteran
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    Joseph- get a hold of yourself! Of course it’s different, since stopping the younger brother means delaying a kiyyum mitzvah.

    in reply to: Yibum & Chalitza Today #776382

    veteran
    Member

    Wolf, no need to wait. As you state, if hair is present a simple exam proves it.

    in reply to: Who wants to be a Tzadaikes like Rus? #1180114

    veteran
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    coffee addict-

    Tzipporah was a young girl tending her father’s sheep and certainly much younger than the nearly 80 year old Moshe, and Osnas may have been the daughter of Dinah, who herself was only around the age of Yosef.

    If you’re looking for a similar age shidduch in the Torah, it’s Adam and Chava. She was still younger though. After that the gap just grew and grew.

    in reply to: Yibum & Chalitza Today #776378

    veteran
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    DY- Saairos. Thus, at least 13 years of age and possibly more.

    in reply to: Do u know your SQ? #776201

    veteran
    Member

    Stupid Question?

    in reply to: please pass along; cars being TOWED from toys r us parking lot!! #1017308

    veteran
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    @gregaaron

    +1 exhibits = good for business

    in reply to: Do you know your IQ? #1054318

    veteran
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    bomb- it really shouldn’t be a big deal. People tend to make more fuss over IQ results than they are worth. An IQ tests measures exactly one thing – just one and nothing else: It measures your aptitude for taking that particular IQ test.

    I don’t say that to be funny.

    A 140 IQ is not necessarily more successful than a 100 IQ in anything other than the test itself. There is also some correlation between an IQ result and intelligence. But this correlation is so limited (and with a high margin of error) that it is not worth putting much stock into.

    It is true that if a person consistently scores 140+ it is possible to draw conclusions about his intelligence that are different from say, those that would be made about someone who consistently scores 100, but you don’t really need the IQ test to tell you those things anyway. If you are a consistent 140 and your friend is a consistent 100 believe me that you would both already be aware of a difference in your levels of intellectualism. Even at a very young age children can distinguish this difference, without the test scores (ask any second grader who the “smart kids in the class” are).

    Bottom line, small differences in IQ is meaningless (white noise) and big differences in IQ is old news. So what’s the difference?

    in reply to: Microsoft Excel Help! #776143

    veteran
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    Different versions of Excel create charts differently, but I can give you a general idea of how to do it.

    1) Build a table. If you want to graph something by days and hours, then your table should be rows of days and columns of hours. Insert your data points in the table accordingly.

    2) In the toolbar, select “Insert -> Chart”. If you are in 2007 or 2010 there are menu buttons for different types of charts in the toolbar. Either way, this will bring you to a wizard. For data source, select the entire table you created in step 1. This will create the graph/chart

    3) Select an empty point inside the graph and right-click. This will bring up an editing menu for the graph, where you can set things such as axis labels, increments, titles, etc.

    Click around a bit until you find exactly what you need or use Excel help (F1). If you ask for help here you need to get much more specific.

    in reply to: Welcome back Dr. Pepper! #776113

    veteran
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    That’s the last time you can claim that.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 145 total)


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