besalel

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Viewing 38 posts - 351 through 388 (of 388 total)
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  • in reply to: techeiles #853057
    besalel
    Participant

    Poppa bar abba: why is such a pious holy man such as yourself paying such close attention to the woman’s section?

    in reply to: techeiles #853034
    besalel
    Participant

    Sam: thanks for cite. Interestingly, Rav ovadia holds that sticking your tzitzit out your pants if you are sefaradi can be an issur too.

    in reply to: techeiles #853028
    besalel
    Participant

    Sam: I also heard of such a shitta but was never able to find one. Can you please direct me?

    in reply to: (Not) eating fish and cheese together #853344
    besalel
    Participant

    wandering chana: most sepharadim also refrain from eating chudush. also, the sefaradic standard for glatt is more restrictive than the ashkenazi. also, their stance on bishul askim make most kosher restaurants off limits (although rav ovadia does say that bishul akum may not apply to restaurants at all so sefaradim can rely on us for restaurants). also on peysach, some sefaradim (afghanis and some bukharians and iranians) wont eat sugar, believe it or not, on peysach.

    on the other hand, most sefaradim eat gelatin (as permitted by rav ovadia). they eat some kitniyos (there are few sefaradim that eat all kitniyos). sefaradim never considered gebruchs on peysach to be problematic. sefardic poskim allow swordfish while ashkenazi do not. sefaradim eat egg matzo on peysach while ashkenazi refrain.

    in reply to: Speaking Yiddish #851815
    besalel
    Participant

    what is wrong with the posters here? there is no such thing as a bad language. every language that you learn is good. yiddish is good. ivrit is good. hebrew is good. man alive.

    as for the “jewishness” of each language, it all depends on what factors you use to determine jewishness of a language. both have many non-semetic words as part of their vocabulary but yiddish is mostly non-jewish words while ivrit is mostly jewish words. in fact, there are probably more “jewish” words in other semitic languages such as arabic than in yiddish. that being said, yiddish is only spoken by jews so it gets some points for jewishness for that. but then again, so is ivrit.

    in reply to: techeiles #853023
    besalel
    Participant

    mamashtakah is absolutely correct but if we were to apply his standard to this place most posts are in violation.

    the thing with techeiles is as follows: there are no halachic tools available to poskim to assist them in determining whether one should go out and wear it. the reasons to wear tekheleis are purely scientific.

    that being said, it is clear among all poskim that there is no halachic violation in wearing blue non-tekheleis.

    The kabbalists, however, caution against wearing blue and believe that in galus we must wear white for kabalistic reasons (something to do with blue bringing middas din on us which we cannot handle in galus).

    the kabbalistic interpretation is troubling in some respects as it appears to use kabbalistic reasons to nullify a mitzvah de-orayssa

    the kabbalists can maybe be understood to mean that the tekheles is surely not genuine because hashem has a reason to hide it from us.

    in any event, since all of us wear blue shirts, suits, socks, etc., we do not live by the words of the kabbalists anyway.

    maskunu: there is no way halacha can obligate us to wear it but it does not hurt to do it.

    in reply to: (Not) eating fish and cheese together #853337
    besalel
    Participant

    its in the beis yosef on the tur but not the shulchan aruch (which was written later). the kabbalists give it credence.

    funny that the best known ashkenzi dish, bagel with cream cheese and lox, is deemed unfit by these sources.

    some sefaradim do not eat it based on this beis yosef and the ben ish chai’s kabbalistic analysis of same. most folks do not live by the kabbala but by halacha. since its halachic origin is murky (some reputable poskim hold its a TYPO in the tur and it should have read meat and fish) they eat it.

    in reply to: How to solve the shidduch crisis? #851244
    besalel
    Participant

    MSS said: “the recent NASI offering which was nausea inducing for many normally very tolerant and easygoing ehrlich people.” AZ, called the statement, “so totally out of line, motzei shem ra, libel.”

    I cannot speak for MSS, but most people i have spoken to from a very wide spectrum of the frum velt, indeed, viewed the NASI initiative very harshly. I have heard it been called rishus and a scam, among other terms.

    on a personal level, the NASI initiative seems to me – at best- no different than someone brokering kidneys – which most people do indeed get nauseated by, even if they understand the need.

    perhaps the initiative is a good one that needs to marketed differently to reduce nausea. maybe we are all judging it harshly because it was presented poorly not because it is really a scam or rishus.

    in reply to: Bad Drivers #897048
    besalel
    Participant

    BY guy:

    NY law defines a yellow light as follows:

    (i) Vehicular traffic facing such signal is thereby warned that the red signal will be exhibited immediately thereafter and such vehicular traffic shall not enter the intersection when the red signal is exhibited.

    (ii) Pedestrians facing such signal are thereby warned that there is insufficient time to cross the roadway, and shall not enter or cross the roadway. Pedestrians already in the roadway shall proceed to the nearest safety island or sidewalk.

    Therefore, your answer is more correct than the cop’s. if you already entered the intersection you can go but if you have not then you cannot enter the intersection on the yellow.

    in reply to: english names for misheberach for cholim:is it permitted? #850931
    besalel
    Participant

    yiddish is not a jewish language it is a foreign language used exclusively by jews. there is a difference.

    also, historically, we adopted names from the goyim and “converted” them to judiasm, like alexander, for example.

    also, the amoraim were not always known by (or even have) a jewish names.

    in reply to: Attn: The Wolf. #852830
    besalel
    Participant

    im feeling the wolf.

    while i proudly subscribe to our great torah community, we find many many among us that do not want to believe in a torah god but rather in make-believe fairy tales and magical unicorns. when you approach these folks with reason, logic and intellect, they lash back like a frightened raccoon cornered in a garage. they spit epithets at you and fall into a repetitive mantra of “apikoyres, apikoyres.”

    some fight back. the wolf is rocking the passive aggression.

    in reply to: How to solve the shidduch crisis? #851202
    besalel
    Participant

    i have a simple solution: any girl that doesnt get married within 2 years of high school has to give me $20,000. i will invest that money in blue chip stocks and triple a bonds in order to make money off your money. but dont worry, i will absolutely make sure that you can get your money back at any time before you get married. i will then pass your name along to any boy i see whether its the right fit or not because, you see, i have a financial interest in seeing you married. once you get married, the keren is mine (in any event, the money i make from the investment is mine). i keep some of the keren for myself and the rest i give to my friends and family.

    radical, huh?

    in reply to: 2 reasons why the bais hamikdosh has not been rebuilt #850126
    besalel
    Participant

    whats the second reason?

    in reply to: english names for misheberach for cholim:is it permitted? #850925
    besalel
    Participant

    what about zeesha, faigy, blima, and other ashkenazi names which are not jewish names but jews use?

    in reply to: Shirayim #850386
    besalel
    Participant

    maybe he is worried that doing so is akin to converting a man into some sort of deity.

    in reply to: our dor and the dor hamabul #1207597
    besalel
    Participant

    i have little doubt that this dor is by far the worst when it comes to things that are sheketz in the eyes of hashem and that we have long passed the dor hamabul and sodon and ammora in that regard. i also believe we have the most and the greatest torah learning and observancy since the beginning of time, both in terms of sheer number and in terms of quality. we are the most polarized dor since the beginning of time.

    in reply to: Kiddush Shabbos Morning on bronf'n #858876
    besalel
    Participant

    knacker: there are many things that chassdim do that most other observant jews consider to be aveiros. making kiddush this way is counted among them. if someone would do that in our shul we would tell him he is not yotzei kiddush.

    i heard that the satmar rebbe used to be mchalel shabbos after shkia until asked otherwise by rav kutler. if this story is true then the satmar rebbe would be considered a mechalel shabbos according to other torah jews. i am not chas veshalov trying to belittle chassidim, gd knows there are things about them we all should learn but facts are facts.

    i dont think you can call crazybrit an antisemite for suggesting that many things that the chassidim do are neged halocho according to everyone else.

    in reply to: divorce support #849963
    besalel
    Participant

    health, this is a true story: in one beis din i know intimately, a couple was getting divorced. at the time of the divorce the woman was crying and saying that this was only happening because of one friend of her husband who poisoned her husband to think that he should get a divorce. she cried and cried and cursed this man over and over again. the very next day, we learned that this man was shot and killed on the same day of the divorce by a business relationship that went sour. this happened only a few years ago and i know all of the people involved. i promise you, hashem does not look lightly upon people who ruin families and in time, whether in this world or not, they will get their due.

    let hashem get revenge for you.

    in reply to: Is it mutar to be an organ donor? #853582
    besalel
    Participant

    a heimish mom: i suggest you learn more about the over 200 orthodox rabbis that allow organ donations. please visit teh halachik organ donor website which identified them. you will find that calling them fringe rabbis is really a big mistake.

    in reply to: Is it mutar to be an organ donor? #853579
    besalel
    Participant

    while i certainly recognize the very valid halachik arguments against organ donation it is comments like the one made by golden mom that make me wonder what int he world has happened to our judaism. to think that we cannot save a life because we will be missing body parts at techiyas hameysim is so far removed from the way the torah wants us to think that it is absolutely scary to imagine that there is a huge chunk of frum yidden that walk around thinking like this.

    in reply to: Is there a Chiyuv to be friendly? #849932
    besalel
    Participant

    I’m not sure the halachik ramifications of your misanthropy but i do know that there’s a job at the dmv with your name all over it!

    in reply to: Things that Cause one to Forget their Torah #1215787
    besalel
    Participant

    i used to hink artcroll did more harm than good. i have learned that i was deeply mistaken. i am maskim that artcroll is a valuable tool. in fact, i am leaning towards replacing my jastrow with an artcroll. artcroll certainly has its place in the bais medrash. but that is not the same issue i was addressing.

    in reply to: Things that Cause one to Forget their Torah #1215785
    besalel
    Participant

    i have found that when i learn out of a english translation of a sefer i tend to forget it quickly. when i learn from the original language and i need to think about the words in front of me actually say i remember it.

    in reply to: Things that Cause one to Forget their Torah #1215784
    besalel
    Participant

    Learning from an artcroll.

    besalel
    Participant

    i will go back to rabbi shimon bar yochai and ask him if he wrote/compiled the zohar

    in reply to: Why do ONLY seminary girls get to learn navi? #859036
    besalel
    Participant

    mussarzoger, no one disagrees. simply put, learning nach requires a certain level of maturity which yeshiva boys lack.

    in reply to: Why do ONLY seminary girls get to learn navi? #859032
    besalel
    Participant

    Why? I think we can more comfortably deal with an ox that fell into a pit than this…

    ???????????, ???-?????????????, ???????? ???-????? ??????????, ?????? ??????? ???????? ?????????. ?????????????, ??? ??????????????, ?????? ???????-????????? ?????????, ????????? ??????? ?????????

    Yechezkel 23:19-20

    Yet she became more and more promiscuous as she recalled the days of her youth, when she was a prostitute in Egypt. There she lusted after her lovers, whose genitals were in size like those of donkeys and whose seminal emission was like that of horses.

    in reply to: What is your most controversial opinion? #848846
    besalel
    Participant

    gavra at work: i dont think that having the tzibbur participate in the torah education of its community is considered lehitztureych labriyos. the public school system is funded by every homeowner. the catholic schools by every member of the catholic church. if education is a basic right and not a privilege then the community ought to bear some of the responsibility. al achas kamma vekamma torah education is a right and not a privilege. also, see ????? ????? ???? ??? ? wherein the obligation to be mechanen children falls on the parents but also the grandparents and the tzibbur. in fact, the chassidishe communities that truly value torah education already have the tzibbur heavily involved in the chinuch of all of its members and tuition among those communities do not break the backs of the parents.

    that being said, we need to be practical. if you can afford to pay tuition, pay it. if you can afford more, pay more. all i am saying is that how much a person earns cannot be the determinitive factor. As an extreme example to make my point: if one person wins a $100 million lottery and never works again in his life, and his shocheyn earns $150,000 annually but is living pay check to pay check we all would agree that the millionaire ought to pay more.

    unfortunately, you are right in looking down upon the way we live in brooklyn but that is the way it is. $150,000 doesnt get you that far. as a community, we probably have our priorities all messed up.

    in reply to: If you've read "NASI Project Responds", have you changed your mind? #848257
    besalel
    Participant

    i think NASI may want to consider having someone else do the talking. the more AZ responds, the worse they look. i hope they use some of that mucho cash that they’re hoarding as they feast in an orgy upon the flesh of the scared and vulnerable to buy some better PR. surprisingly, self-righteous and obnoxious defenses wherein essentially all the detractors are basically called stupid, does not appear to be having a positive effect on the oilam.

    in reply to: What is your most controversial opinion? #848829
    besalel
    Participant

    in response to simcha613 who stated: “I heard a story of someone with a $150,000 a year salary applying for scholarship”

    a family of 7, after taxes your $150,000 becomes about $100,000. you have 4 kids in yeshiva, each one asks for $11,000 meaning you pay $44,000 in tuition. You have rent of about $2500 a month and student loans and credit card debts of about $1000 a month. thats $42,000 a year right there. Car payments and car insurance cuts another $500 a month. there goes another $6,000. 4 shabboses a week cost you another $1000 a month, and there goes another $12,000. and now youre $4000 in the hole. and you have nothing to save so youll never buy a house. you cant afford a babysitter, yet alone a night out so you never go out. we havent even discussed summer camps.

    dude, a person making $150,000 may need a scholarship.

    i have heard from a number of yeshiva executives that they expect a high earner to set aside 25% of his income to yeshiva tuition. a person making $150,000, thus, should pay $37,500 in tuition. if that person has 4 kids in yeshiva, thats $9,350 per kid which means he needs a scholarship.

    i believe the problem does not lie with the high earners. it sometimes lies with those kollel folks who have had their parents/inlaws pay for their homes, supplement their income, pay for their vacations, pay for their cars and end up having a better standard of living than the high earners but then come to the yeshivos expecting to pay nothing for tuition because they are in “klei kodesh.”

    in reply to: What is your most controversial opinion? #848828
    besalel
    Participant

    i think anyone that puts vinegar on israeli salad should be chayuv missa. anyone that uses lemon juice from a bottle should be flogged and anyone that puts iceberg lettuce in an israeli salad – ein lo cheleyk. those that hand squeeze limes instead of lemons – harei zeh meshubuch.

    in reply to: If you've read "NASI Project Responds", have you changed your mind? #848240
    besalel
    Participant

    AZ makes one good point: time will tell a lot. if the folks at nasi become filthy rich, as they hope, then obviously nasi has filled a void that actually existed. if they fall flat then we learn, in hindsight, where these folks were coming from – just using scare tactics to make money off of people’s fears and weaknesses.

    i would add, however, that even if it is a successful program, it would still be quite disgusting from an ordinary person’s point of view. i would compare it to a kidney broker: sure, he provides a very valuable service to people in need but uch, what an awful way to make a dollar.

    any way you look at it, the folks behind nasi don’t look good.

    besalel
    Participant

    Driving a Hummer is immodest for any Jew (or any person really) because it serves NO purpose other than to call attention to yourself. Its only purpose is to show off. Modesty is the opposite of that. Same with any status symbol/object whose only purpose is to draw attention to oneself. Same with any item of clothes that call attention to a woman, man, or any body part or parts of said woman or man. When the “frum” Jewish people begin to look at modesty in this wider perspective, not just as the lack of revealing clothing, then problems such as the Kiddush problem identified here will be solved.

    in reply to: Credit Card “Shtick/Fraud” – is it stealing? #650633
    besalel
    Participant

    We sometimes find erlich looking jews looking to buy chewing gum that is kosher “lechoyl hashitoys” yet are looking to make money that is kosher “afiloo al pi da’as yuchid.” It is never chewing gum that is kosher “afiloo al pi da’as yuchid” but money that is kosher “lochoyl hashitoys.” Maybe the priority there is messed up.

    Even if this schtick is kosher according to a certain understanding of a certain pesak of a certain posek isn’t it better that your money be “kasher lechol hashitot?”

    besalel
    Participant

    This had been mentioned before but it needs to be highlighted. The problem is really simple. Instead of teaching about tzniut, the frum culture focused on rules. The rules say you must cover your elbows and knees. Being Jews, we found so many ways to stick to the rules while totally getting around the concept of tzniut. No doubt that rules are helpful in giving us some guidance of how to behave, rules are not the ikkar. Therefore, the Jewish leaders need to rise up and say: driving a Hummer/Escalade, etc. is NOT MODEST; wearing Prada/Gucci (no matter how long the sleeves) is NOT MODEST; wearing $3000 wigs is NOT MODEST; calling attention to yourself and showing off is NOT MODEST even if your elbows and knees are covered.

    in reply to: Rav Ovadia Relates to Soldierís Needs #619512
    besalel
    Participant

    Willi, according to rav ovadia, ashkenazim cannot because they hold of “hashma’at kol” and most dryers are pretty noisy, unless youre Milhouse and found a quiet machine. Ashkenazim can only do so in sha’at hadchak circumstances, which would need to be evaluated by your rav. Sefaradim, however, are permitted to do what you describe above.

    in reply to: Lift & Cut Shavers #623621
    besalel
    Participant

    From my understanding this “lift and cut” business is just a marketing ploy and that the “life and cut” shavers do not operate any differently nor do they cut any closer than any rotary based shavers. I have seen and felt rotarty shaves versus foil shaves and found that they both cut above skin-level. There are certain methods of shaving which should be avoided. for example, pulling the skin back tightly and pressing the shaver against your skin (against the grain) can get you in trouble halachaclly whether you use a foil or any rotary. in other words, it doesnt matter what shaver you use, what matters if the method you use to shave. I know the poskim have gone both ways about the lift and cut but has there ever been a scientific evaluation of the product?

    in reply to: Rav Ovadia Relates to Soldierís Needs #619507
    besalel
    Participant

    There is no chiddush here as Rav Ovadia’s son specifically recalls his father’s pask on this exact issue in the exact same manner in Siman Resh Nun Bet of Yalkut Yosef. If you will look there (and i know you won’t) you will see that the psak is not limited to chayalim except for ashkenazim who hold like the rama with regard to “hashma’at kol” in which case it is limited to chayalim.

    last time i checked we still held like bet hillel and against bet shamai that “ein melacha bekelim.” In other words, kelim, like washing machines, cannot, by jewish legal definition, commit a melacha. even the inyan that in israel the electric companies are jewish operated and mechaleleh shabbat has been addressed by rav ovadia in the past where he held since the electricity is also generated for permitted uses (like hospitals) it is permitted to derive benefit from it if you are not mechalel yourself, of course.

    But it is very very old news. ynet or haaretz, whose editors do not learn, may be susceptible to reporting this as new but i am surprised at yw’s decision to publish this as new.

Viewing 38 posts - 351 through 388 (of 388 total)