oomis

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  • in reply to: Internet vs. Yiddishkeit #627485
    oomis
    Participant

    Like all things in life, the internet can be used for good or for bad. There are illegal drugs being abused – should the medical world not be allwoed to prescribe medicine for the PROPER reasons? There are people abusing alcohol – maybe no Jew should be allowed to buy wine or schnaaps. There are people who overeat and become obese – maybe all food should be outlawed, too. Come on, there will always be SOMEONE who uses a good and valuable tool for an inappropriate purpose. That does not mean we should throw the baby out with the bathwater.

    in reply to: Share Cholent Recipes? #1038106
    oomis
    Participant

    Sorry, I typed this last post without proofreading it. Too many typos, and I am so-o-o-o-o ashamed….

    in reply to: Working on Chol Hamoe’d #847022
    oomis
    Participant

    Most people cannot take off for Ch”H. They would lose their jobs. The halacha is that it is preferable NOT to work then, but if one cannot avoid it, it is permissible.

    in reply to: Is it the correct thing to have takanos for weddings? #623099
    oomis
    Participant

    I have mixed feelings about this. I don’t have a great deal of money, but I don’t feel it is my place or anyone else’s to tell someone else how to spend his. Yes, people get way too frivolous at times, and spend conspicuously, but as long as these same people are giving their maaser money to Tzedaka with the same open hand as they spend it on their simchas, then I have no reason to be critical of them. We cannot all be equal financially, and I think it is wrong to try to tell someone who can afford certain things, not to use his money to buy them. Then again, I feel uncomfortable with sometimes feeling as though we need to “keep up with the Goldbergs,” when many of us clearly cannot. I think the answer lies somewhere in the middle, and maybe in Kallah classes, and even starting early in Yeshivah, priorities should be taught to be less grandiose. Just my opinion…

    in reply to: Share Cholent Recipes? #1038104
    oomis
    Participant

    Cholent came about for a number of reasons, but I suspect the first one might be to show people such as the Karaites who only beleived in the written literal translation fo the Torah without the Toah She b’al peh, that “lo siva’aru aish b’chol moshvoseichem” on Shabbos, did not mean that one had to sit in the dark for Shabbos and eat cold food. By making a food that conformed to the halacha and was already pre-cooked and then left on a warm blech until the next day’s lunch meal on Shabbos, the Jews who were Shomrei Torah u’mitzvos were validating the Talmud. The TYPE of food used in cholent probably was a mixture of the foods which were most affordable to most Jews, a tiny amount of flanken mixed in with an abundance of beans and potatoes, cheap, healthy protein and carbohydrates. There are many variations on a basic choletn, but almost all types call for those basic ingredients.

    in reply to: The Big Event 2 #622143
    oomis
    Participant

    no i am sorry to tell you but you are wrong. 1. no godol is hashems mouthpiece.

    While I absolutely believe that we have to respect our gedolim, the notion that they are Ha-Shem’s mouthpiece sounds uncomfortably close to l’havdil what the Catholic church thinks about the Pope. No one is infallible, not even a great Gadol, including Moshe Rabbeinu ZT”L. People err all the time, including rabbis. I had a rov totally change a p’sak he gave me, the day after he paskened a shailah (and the original p’sak was very harsh and I already had followed it, by the time he changed his mind). I deeply respected that he took the time to continue to check out the halacha, but his initial stance was very dogmatic, and he should have not been so insistent on his decision before having checked the other sources that ultimately caused him to reverse his decision.

    At no time did I argue the p’sak with him, or give him the impression I was annoyed. I followed it to the letter, it was yes-yes or no-no. But it really messed me up, cost me money, time, and effort, and in the end he changed his mind. People are human, they have bad days, they are stricter,they are more lenient, they understand things differently from other people who have equally intelligent minds. They also can make mistakes. No rov should be such a baal gaivah that he thinks he can never be wrong. I have come across such rabbonim, and they are sometimes chalilah marchik Jews from Yiddishkeit with their black and white way of looking at things. Life is in shades of gray, sometimes. That’s why there are differing opinions and shivim panim l’Torah.

    in reply to: Raisin Challah #622147
    oomis
    Participant

    We use it from Rosh Hashana through Simchas Torah, and only eat it with honey throughout that time. The challahs are baked in a spiral circular shape.

    in reply to: Should Yeshiva Bochrim Dress in “Style” ? #622241
    oomis
    Participant

    I am not a name-brand type of person. Prada bags do not impress me, Calvin Klein, Yves St. Laurent, and yes, shirts with little alligators on them, do not give me a thrill. As long as the clothing is attractive, clean, and flattering to its wearer, I care very little for its origins. People should not go into debt to outfit their children. The first time my son came home from Yeshivah informing me he wanted a pair of Caraviccis (sp?), I informed HIM that he could earn the money himself to buy the pants, but if not, it was either secondhand or not at all. He got the message. Tried to earn the money, saw that the pants were way more expensive than he anticipated, and understood what it meant for his parents to spend money on him for clothing.

    in reply to: Is 3 Cups of Coffee a Day Too Much? #803326
    oomis
    Participant

    Three cups a day are not excessive. If you are concerned, switch to decaf. But for ANYONE who drinks a lot of coffee, do yourslef a favor and cut back gradually before Yom Kippur, and wean yourself to decaf by a few days before, which will substantially help you to fast more easily without getting the headache that is often associated with a 25 hour fast.

    in reply to: Chopped Liver #909908
    oomis
    Participant

    funny – people’s preferences. I so much prefer beef liver to chicken (never had veal liver). I think there are meat stores where the liver is pre-kashered (mostly broiled and edible as is). I used to watch my mom O”H kasher the liver in her special pan (nauseating to watch, though). She always made her own chopped liver. Maybe I will tackle it someday. I am still working on trying to duplicate her gefilte fish, which to this day, remains unparalleled (no one even comes close). It was so much part of her persona to be the one to make these foods, that I actually never learned exactly how she did it,even watching her. The fish loaves just don’t cut it. I do make a three layer baked gefilte fish terrine, that is really good.

    in reply to: Apple Cranberry Crunch #739581
    oomis
    Participant

    I have successfully streamlined this recipe by using two cans of applie filling. I absolutely HATE peeling apples. (OOPS, does this disqualify my daughters for shidduchim????)

    in reply to: Chopped Liver #909906
    oomis
    Participant

    YUM! Cherrybim that sounds awesome! I know my mom O”H used to grind in walnuts and

    hb eggs, and hers was to die for!. When she died, her recipe died with her. I also have eaten some amazing mock liver crepes, but have no way to find THAT recipe. They are also on the sweetish side. My dad O”H used to make us a real chopped liver “sandwich” for Shabbos, by wrapping the liver in a large lettice leaf and rolling it up. It was so good, and boy did I just get a happy memory jolt typing this!

    in reply to: Chopped Liver #909904
    oomis
    Participant

    Sweet chulent with ketchup… Sweet Liver… what other delicious haimishe foods are being ruined with the American sweet palate?

    How about sweet potato kugel?

    Sweet potatoes make a GREAT kugel (yeah, yeah, I know you meant sweet POTATOES, not sweet potatoes).

    in reply to: Buying German Products #727666
    oomis
    Participant

    I do not bedavka look to buy from Germany, but I wouldn’t refrain from doing so if I found something I wanted. They do make a better product in m any cases. If you don’t buy German, neither should you buy ANY product that is international (except Danish, maybe), because there is hardly a country anywhere that has not actively sought to destroy the Jewish people, including Italy (Rome), France, England, Spain, any Third World country, you get the idea. No one LOVES the Jews. That does not mean I cannot enjoy their products. I only will not buy from Arabs or anyone whom I fear is funding terrorism. If Germany is part of that today, I wouldn’t buy from them. But I wouldn’t punish a generation that did not even exist until several generations AFTER the Holocaust, by not doing business with them. Only Ha-Shem should decide to punish subsequent generatiojhs for the sins of the fathers, and HE only does so, if those generations follow in their forebears’ footsteps.

    in reply to: Eating Healthy During Yom Tovim #652581
    oomis
    Participant

    One thing dieters can take advantage of on yom tov is SOUP. Unlike shabbos, on yom tov you can warm up (or cook up) some soup to fill you up. Here is an old favorate of mine which is very adaptable.

    Delicious Vegetable Soup

    One can (28 ounces) crushed tomatoes, no sugar added

    2 cans water (58 ounces)

    three onions, cut up

    4-6 stalks celery, cut up

    3 beef or chicken boullion

    1 bag (20 ounces) frozen carrots

    1 bag (20 ounces) frozen string beans

    1 bag (20 ounces) frozen cauliflower

    1 large head of cabbage, cut up

    combine all ingredients in a VERY LARGE pot. Season with your favorate seasonings. cook until celery is fork tender, about 1-1 1/2 hours. I like to take part of it and blend and then put back into pot. freezed well for succos too, enjoy!

    Hey, how about low cal. section, YW??

    Soup is a great diet aid, as long as it is not creamed or thickened with a starch. The idea of blending part and adding it back is a good one, it will thicken the soup to a creamier consistency. The addition of chicken pieces and/or giblets will make it heartier.

    Steer clear of trying to be too great a “tzaddik” in eating challah and honey. A kazayis is enough (THAT is my personal Waterloo, that and my home-baked honey cake).

    in reply to: Should Yeshiva Bochrim Dress in “Style” ? #622214
    oomis
    Participant

    Their clothing should fit properly, should be neat and clean, and not look like it came out of the Salvation Army Thrift Store. Their personal grooming/hygiene should be impeccable (and often the opposite is the case) That being said, there is no reason why they cannot look “shtotty” and be Yeshivah bochurim, but they should not be so consumed with their appearance that they are checking out their reflections in the mirror every few minutes. Girls are not the only one who should dress attractively. (If you are one of those who believe girls should NOT dress attractively, then please ignore the entire previous paragraph).

    in reply to: Chopped Liver #909902
    oomis
    Participant

    Member

    here is someone’s recipie for good vegitearian burgers

    1) take one pack of tofu and pour it into a bowl

    2) combine all the spices together into another bowl

    3) dump the tofu, and use real beef

    4) you get the point?

    LOL! You also reminded me of Gracie Allen’s foolproof roast beef. Take a large roast beef and a small roast beef. Put them in the oven. When the little one burns, the big one is done.

    You can also make beef and wine , by pouring a large glass of wine, putting the beef in the roaster, pouring a tbs. of the wine over the roast, putting it in the oven and drinking the rest of the wine…

    in reply to: Sweet and Sour Meatballs #622064
    oomis
    Participant

    Thanks for the info Sarah. I do have the kosher section in my Favorites.

    in reply to: Chopped Liver #909899
    oomis
    Participant

    I would use Vidalia onions and saute them very slowly until they caramelize. You can add a little sugar to the onions to speed up the process, but slow caramelization is the key to bringing out all the sweetness of the onion. Beef liver is better than chicken, I think.

    Apropos of liver recipes – anyone have a failsafe, foolproof vegetarian liver recipe?

    in reply to: Sweet and Sour Meatballs #622062
    oomis
    Participant

    Yum! This is by far the best thread on YWN (KOSHER COOKING!)! Thank you so much for this add on. It’s nice to have at least one thread that does not involve drama, just yumminess.

    I’m with you. I LOVE this thread, but why is it not on the FOOD section yet? In any case, I make my meatballs (ping pong ball or golf ball size) with chop meat, onion soup mix, minced garlic, bread crumbs or matzah meal, and sometimes raw rice. I shape the balls and throw them into a simmering sauce made from two or more large jars of marinara sauce, a jar of water, then lemon juice and brown sugar until the sauce is sweet and sour to taste. Simmer for about an hour or until done, on a low flame.

    in reply to: Why not Obama? #715106
    oomis
    Participant

    He is too inexperienced to be a president. Had he been someone’s VP running mate, I would have not been as scared of him, because he really would have little power. But the Dems picked the wrong person for the job. He is not a leader, he is not decisive, and he showed very poor judgment with the “lipstick on a pig, it’s still a pig” comment SPECIFICALLY because the word lipstick was used just the previous week by Sarah Palin (and if he feigns innocence of malicious intent, he is not very credible to me). There is no question in my mind that this was a dig at her. If his speechwriters or advisors told him to use that phrase (and it was not of his own doing), then he STILL comes up short, because it shows he has extremely stupid people advising him,and he hasn’t the seichel to override their poor advice. he is no president.

    McCain is the lesser of two evils,and at least he has actually served his country and has kids who likewise have served. HIS wife is not busy saying arrogant things like this is the first time I have felt proud of my country. If she feels that way, why on earth would she want her husband to lead it?

    I am not thrilled with either of the choices we are offered, but one clearly has more experience at leading than does the other.

    in reply to: Flanken Kugel #808056
    oomis
    Participant

    UJM’s comment was ill-advised, but I took it to be intended as a joke. I don’t know if you two have a history of negative comments towards each other, as I have not been on this site too long, but if you don’t and UJM would have no reason to otherwise want to insult you, do you think you could try to be dan l’chaf z’chus in the month of Elul (as you yourself pointed out, Illinois), and think that maybe UJM was just making a really poor joke at your expense, and not actively seeking to actually accuse you of being non-kosher?

    in reply to: Scene at OHare Airport in Chicago This Past Sunday Afternoon #622016
    oomis
    Participant

    So at a public wedding, at a badeken, it IS ok, but not at the airport where the parent may not see his daughter again for a year?????? C’mon, this is her father!

    in reply to: Bar-B-Que #670915
    oomis
    Participant

    re: charring wooden skewers – if you soak the skewers in water for several hours or overnight, supposedly, it will not char (It makes no sense to me, but I hear this on a grilling segment of a news show.

    in reply to: NEW TOPIC: Kosher Cooking! #628212
    oomis
    Participant

    1 roast (any type, short chuck, veal, french roast, top of the rib) or cut up chicken, or turkey roast or parts.

    1 large jar duck sauce

    packet of dry onion soup mix

    minced garlic (fresh or dry)

    cinnamon

    Place roast or chicken in pan and sprinkle with onion soup mix, garlic, duck sauce, and LOTS of cinnamon, in that order. Cover tightly with foil and bake at 350 degree until fork-tender (time varies with type of meat or poultry being cooked). When meat is soft, uncover, shut off the oven, and leave the meat in the oven until nicely browned in the residual heat. It’s sweet, so it really is appropriate for R”H. You can add chunks of potatoes to the pan and they will glaze nicely during the baking process.

    in reply to: Bar-B-Que #670910
    oomis
    Participant

    Try partially baking the chicken in the oven, then finishing it on the grill. Oftentimes, the chicken on the grill is not fully cooked, but the outside looks really done or burned. Pre-cooking it somewhat will help.

    in reply to: Whats wrong with a convert?!?!?! #622329
    oomis
    Participant

    Geirim no longer necessarily break all ties with their former family members, just as people generally no longer sit shiva when their child marries a non-Jew G-d forbid.

    I feel for the ger or geyores who posted originally, ebcause it would be naive to think that this is not a problem for them. But, people have a right to feel that a shidduch might be too fraught with problems for them to want to take on those problems. I married a baal teshuvah and he is a tzaddik and a real mensch in every way. But there were sholom bayis issues when his family did not accept that we would not attend the interfaith marriage of his niece, and other issues along the way. My in-laws were outstanding baalei chessed, my husband gets those middos from them. We learned to deal with the various problems that arose. But how do you deal with in-laws who truly believe their precious daughter is going to Gehenom for becoming a Jew and denouncing their “saviour?” It is not a glatt issue, and I blame no one for not wanting to take on this challenge. Perhaps the solution is for geirim to seek out other geirim. I don’t know. I do have several friends who are geirei tzedek,and I truly do not think of them as “formerly goyim.” They are simply my good friends.

    in reply to: Dan Lecaff Zechus! #621714
    oomis
    Participant

    I like I Can Only Try’s version of that story better. It makes more sense. I thought this story was in The Other Side of the Story, which I read several eyars ago. Maybe I messed up on a a detail or two, but the gist is the same. Try’s version makes more sense, that they sat in the back and therefore the hearing-impaired lady could not read lips easily. It was not rude of them, but perhaps had they gotten there earlier they could have given the speaker a heads-up.

    in reply to: Share Cholent Recipes? #1038084
    oomis
    Participant

    Thanks so much Shindy, I ‘ll let you knwo how it comes out, when I make it, B”EH.

    Also, re: pancake syrup in the cholent – several people I know like to put sweet potatoes into the chulent or a little honey (especially around Rosh Hashana time).It is an unusual taste for most of us, but it does not make the choletn taste bad, and in fact can be quite good.

    in reply to: Snoods VS. Sheitels #621681
    oomis
    Participant

    Mariner made some really excellent points. We tend to think that “frum” means only a particular levush or derech, when in fact there is a wide and eclectic variety of frum Jews (some of whom do not even use the word “Yidden” in their daily speech) and ALL of them are shomrei Torah u’mitzvos. I think it is of value for elements of the frum world to recognize that there are shivim panim l’Torah, and that maybe their own particular path is no better or worse than another one.

    in reply to: Shidduch Solutions #1099669
    oomis
    Participant

    The extensive vetting process is itself the cause of many a shidduch to not come to fruition. By the time the Mamas have both checked each others’ families out,so much time may have elapsed that neither party is interested in going forward. It would be really nice if people would just let a boy and a girl meet each other, allow the boy to (horrors!) actually call the girl HIMSELF without the shadchan butting in, and have the girl speak for herself. If the kids are old enough to date, they ought to be mature enough to arrange said date without any intervention past the point of the two young people being suggested to each other. If a boy does not know how to ask a girl out, he is not old enough to be thinking about getting married. If a girl cannot turn down a second or third date, or conversely ACCEPT a second date by having the fellow ask her out directly, then she is way too sheltered. This is not the 18th century. We are not helping our kids by making them think that this type of shidduch dating is the right way. It only slows down their personal growth and maturity. Life is full of unpleasant and uncomfortable situations that must be handled with good judgment. If we can’t allow our kids to exercise that judgment in dating, what makes us think they will be better equipped to do so a few short months from that time?

    in reply to: New to YWN, & Frumkeit – Questions? #626341
    oomis
    Participant

    Mazel tov and much success to you in your endeavor. “To Be A Jew” by Donen (or Donin) is a good book to read, as is “The Jewish Book of Why.” I would get involved with a group of people such as those in Aish HaTorah, who specialize in kiruv (bringing Jews closer to G-d). Above all, in my opinion, it is better to take small steps that are concrete and lasting, rather than BIG steps that may or may not take. Flipping in and flipping out are common among people who take on too much at once. I have seen it happen time and again. But when you take upon yourself basic Shabbos observance, eating kosher food, and trying to learn about basic Judaism, you give yourself a foundation to build upon. When you find a rav you can rely upon and who is patient and happy to answer the manuy questions that will surely arise, you will have a great start. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, and try to surround yourself with influences that will help strengthen you in your quest. All the best to you.

    in reply to: Share Cholent Recipes? #1038078
    oomis
    Participant

    Oh my goodness! Here it is Sunday night, and my mouth is watering for cholent.

    Anybody have an outstanding salt and pepper lukshin kugel or potato kugel that draws raves???? (or anything interesting in the kugel department?)

    in reply to: New Reason For Shidduch Crisis #998945
    oomis
    Participant

    If 1) all the “good boys” are learning in Kollel and not learning a trade for parnassah(and according to the Gemarah it is a chiyuv of every father’s to see to it that his son learns a trade), and if 2) all the boys learning in Kollel can ONLY go into chinuch, because they know nothing about anything but learning Torah, then what is going to happen when the Kollel generation’s children grow up, also go into Kollel, do not learn a trade (other than chinuch)just like their fathers before them did not learn a trade, and their parents are in no position to support THEM, because chinuch really pays very little? And what if, btw, they are really not cut out to be in chinuch? Not every genius in learning can give it over to Talmidim. We do our children no favor when we actively discourage them from thinking that making a real parnassa is of little value. It takes money to pay for rent and utilities, as well as for the Yeshivah education that we want our kids to get. Part of the shidduch world should be teaching our kids the REAL facts of life and not the esoteric and idealized concepts that our daughters are being taught about being the money-earner in the household. There is nothing romantic about a burnt-out, tapped out wife who has babies to raise, and a parnassa to earn, and I think that many girls are afraid to admit that this concerns them, for fear of being labeled something unflattering and therefore shidduchly-undesirable.

    in reply to: Tznius Standards #651095
    oomis
    Participant

    “Why does everyone have to stand on the exact wording that was used????”

    That’s because if you are talking about halacha, you ought to be very sure you are being accurate. The entire Torah is about exact wording. Every letter of every word means something.

    in reply to: Tznius Standards #651089
    oomis
    Participant

    Sometimes I just wonder to myself if Ha-Shem Yisborach is not kivyachol shaking His head from side to side, saying, “You foolish people – That’s NOT what I meant!!!!!”

    Too often, people accept chumros upon themselves (as is their right) and start to believe that those chumros are halacha l’maiseh. Then when they see other frum people who have a different (not better or worse) hashkafa and derech, they look down on them as not being frum enough. It’s true, kol hamosif goreah (and isn’t it interesting that the Torah itself admonishes us not to add or subtract from the Torah). If all one can say about what they believe to be halacha is that they don’t know the makor, but they are SURE there is one, there is a problem. That is how some people go off the derech.

    in reply to: Text Messaging #1116342
    oomis
    Participant

    First of all, Mariner,I am really not full of myself. Second, gonisoheiv, I really do need to proofread my posts, as I have many more errors than “humorous,” which was the only one you seemed to have caught. Oh well… 🙂

    in reply to: The Jewish Version #644493
    oomis
    Participant

    I listened to some snippets of it, but frankly was not impressed. I don’t care for the particular secular music chosen for the “Jewish Version” lyrics. I enjoy Gershon Veroba’s “Variations,” much more.

    in reply to: The Jewish Version #644489
    oomis
    Participant

    Haven’t heard of it, what is it about?

    in reply to: Does everyone have to live in Lakewood? #621100
    oomis
    Participant

    Try HOUSTON. I have a couple of friends who moved there and are extremely happy. The standard of living is excellent and costs way less than living in NY. It is getting more young frum couples, and they are able to actually afford mansions for what they would pay for a very small, plain house with no property, here.

    in reply to: Text Messaging #1116338
    oomis
    Participant

    Texting is a poor substitute for communication, because it involves the use of crude symbols in place of real words. The fact that we are posting here on this forum is NOT hypocritical, as asserted by “Careful,” as we are a) not writing short text messages in shortand form and b) we are not sitting here all day at the computer (or at least, I sincerely hope that that is true), with our fingers ont he keyboard. Kids who are texting are doing it ALL DAY LONG, openly, furtively, in the street, in class, and I would even assume, while in the bathroom. It is SO prevalent that humerous commercials have been made about that very issue.

    E-mailing or posting is actually a superior form of communication in the sense that it resembles the lost art form of LETTER WRITING, which no one seems to do anymore. the written wrod has a great deal of power. I know that when I e-mail a friend, I choose my word very carefully and really think about what I want to convey, especially as there is no real emotional thermometer in a piece of paper, by which the reader can accurately assess what you mean by a specific turn of phrase. Emoticons notwithstanding, people havbe to read and re-read what one writes, in order to get a feel for the writer’s intentions, at times. When I have a verbal conversation with someone, I don’t have the luxury of a great deal of time to respond when speaking. I cannot pause and think for a few minutes, as I do when I am responding by e-mail.

    Texting, by its very nature, is a quick response, no deep thought required. For that, and other reasons, I think it should be limited.

    in reply to: Dan Lecaff Zechus! #621710
    oomis
    Participant

    There was a story told of a man who was delivering a speech to a crowded audience. He was distracted by the sight of a woman in the front row engaged in a very animated discussion with the lady sitting next to her. She was contantly talking and gesturing with her hands. The man finished his speech, but was very ticked off at this rudeness. While speaking to people following the lecture, this same woman came up to him, and said,” I just wanted to tell you how much my mother and I enjoyed your lecture. My mom has been a fan of yours for many years and wanted to attend your lectures in person, but she is hearing-impaired, and this was the first time I was available to attend with her, so that I could repeat your lecture in sign language, and she could read my lips as I repeated what you were saying.”

    There is ALWAYS a reason to be dan L”Z with most people.

    in reply to: Do we really need Seminary in Israel? #621081
    oomis
    Participant

    As with all things in life, Seminary in EY for a year is good for some and less beneficial to others. For the person who is serious about making a “connection” with EY, as well as learning, this can be a tremendous growth experience. For the kid who views the year (or two) away as a “12-month party,” this is clearly not the right attitude to be bringing to the table.

    My time in a girls’ seminary was well-spent, my learning and love of learning increased tremendously, and the experience of living with a bunch of girls from all over the world, opened my eyes to how blessed I was to be in EY, which I loved with all my heart. It’s true that it is a financial sacrifice, and it is equally true that NOT all kids benefit from the experience to the extent that their parents would hope. But I have a friend who sent her son to a well-known boys’ yeshivah, with the reputation for taking in difficult boys, a kid who was really off the derech, doing all kinds of things that none of us would like to contemplate. She sent him there really to put some safe distance between them. The first year, he went simply to be able to come and go as he pleased without mommy and daddy on his back. He decided the first year was so liberating that he wanted to go back for a second year. During the first half of his second year something happened – he got turned around, ended up switching to a more intense Yeshivah for another few years, then came back to the US, got his smicha and is now a rebbie himself, working with disenfranchised youth. Does this happen to every

    kid who goes to ISrael? No. But it happens sufficiently often that it is worth doing, if at all possible. Sometimes just the experience of being in EY is the good part.

    Avira d’Ar’a machkim, after all.

    in reply to: Web scam – HDcameraworld #620865
    oomis
    Participant

    You base your feeling that these are frum Jews by the HOURS of operation (“Maybe after a shiur”)?????? So fraudulent NON-Jews don’t keep weird hours? Maybe the person who ran this scam has ANOTHER job. Unless you know for a fact that your suspicions are correct, you should not make such a comment, in my opinion. And if it turns out it IS owned by Jews, shame on them.

    in reply to: Snoods VS. Sheitels #621631
    oomis
    Participant

    You would be right, unless the reason for covering the hair is that only the ACTUAL hair growing on the married woman’s hair (and not a beautiful shaitel) is assur to all males but the woman’s husband. Maybe the reason is NOT modesty per se(and it is not delineated in the Torah shehbichsav at all), but simply that once a woman is married, only her husband is permitted to see her hair in its natural state. Therefore, covering it by ANY means, including a pretty shaitel, is accomplsihing that end. I have seen gorgeous hats, pretty (and rather pricey) snoods, and there are some beautiful wraparound tichelech that are formed into a bun, that make many girls look more attractive than their own natural hair ever was. It’s not the more attractive/less attractive that is important, it is simply a case that the halacha is that married women should cover their hair, because the hair is erva after marriage. By the logic stated that women should not wear attractive shaitlech, maybe they should also not dress in pretty clothing for Shabbos and Yom Tov, or for a simcha, even if the clothing is tzniusdig.

    in reply to: Dating Dilemmas #621301
    oomis
    Participant

    “He writes (and oomis1105 repeats it): ‘yichud is prohibited [with an unmarried woman] and has the severity of yihud d’oraisa ,due to her being a nidah.”

    I never said that. That was Geshmakenstein’s quote, not mine. All I did was ask for the makor where it states that a kallah is erva to her chosson, and therefore should not be complimented by him or vice versa. I wanted to know the exact source for that. I made absolutely no comments about yichud d’Oraisa or otherwise.

    in reply to: Rambam on Marriage #626218
    oomis
    Participant

    The Torah is so specific regarding the issur of a man abusing his SERVANT (the eved ivri who is sold into servitude in order to repay a debt or such), does it make sense that the Torah would matir a man abusing his WIFE, whom he is required to be mechabeid more than himself?

    in reply to: Are Crocs Tznius #1076130
    oomis
    Participant

    If flashy colors were good enough for Yosef haTzaddik, and if maaseh avos siman l’banim, why is this even an issue? Yaakov Avinu did not err by giving his son a colorful beged ish, his mistake was in showing favoritism to one son over all the others.

    in reply to: definition of average #623329
    oomis
    Participant

    You are asking if something is the norm, not if it is normal. Something may b e the current norm, meaning that most people do it, but it does not make that thing that they are doing normal, necessarily (nor does it make it not normal. For example, it may be the norm for girls to starve themselves in order to fit into a size zero, for fear of not getting a shidduch. Is the behavior normal? Not at all. It is prevalent, thus making it a norm of sorts, but it is not normal for someone already thin to keep dieting, thinking she has to lose more weight. Just my opinion.

    in reply to: Ticheles Nowadays; Legit or Not? #669972
    oomis
    Participant

    I think this is one of the more interesting topics on this site. I have always been fascinated by techeiles, and my Rov brought back some from Eretz Yisroel, which he personally researched and was absolutely convinced is authentic. It is exciting to me whenever something of ancient Judaism is brought into our modern day world, especially since it is a mitzvah d’Oreisa to put techeiles on the Tzitzis. It truly connects us with our ancestors. I hope that the dye that is being called techeiles now, is in fact the real McCoy. What I have seen is more of a teal/aqua/skyblue combination, and I am wondering if each one of us perceives the shade of blue differently. In any case, I have felt uplifted by what I have seen, and find it very beautiful. And I don’t even get to wear it!

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