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  • in reply to: Lubavitch Hats #1596096

    slominer
    Participant

    Neville ChaimBerlin: What were you trying to say regarding how Lubavitch hats compare to Yeshivish hats?

    in reply to: Eruv Question (regarding 600K people) #1596100

    slominer
    Participant

    DaMoshe: Very few people from outside Brooklyn come to Coney Island. At least not since the 1960s, when most of the attractions on Coney Island closed down.

    in reply to: help! Wedding questions #1596103

    slominer
    Participant

    LAMother: Which takana halls have you looked into or heard about?

    in reply to: Alchohol #1595604

    slominer
    Participant

    What would you like for them to talk about instead, if they stop talking about alcohol?

    in reply to: Non crowded great chol hamoed places #1595527

    slominer
    Participant

    Mammele — I don’t understand how you can recommend beaches and the water when, even if there’s a smaller crowd, will inevitably contain pritzus.

    in reply to: Lubavitch Hats #1595499

    slominer
    Participant

    Milhouse — the regular Lubavitcher Chasidim, during the Frierdika Rebbe’s time, didn’t wear the fedora down-hats they now wear. That only started with the last Rebbe. Why the change among the Chasidim about the time the last Rebbe assumed the Rebbeship? Previously the Chasidim wore uphats.

    And idea about the differences, if any, between Lubavitcher hats (today) versus Yeshivish/Litvish hats?

    in reply to: Shabbos Hat #1595424

    slominer
    Participant

    Hi Yitz,

    Try YeshivishHats dot com. They sell hats for $55.

    in reply to: help! Wedding questions #1595425

    slominer
    Participant

    A takana wedding in New York can save you quite a bundle compared to LA. And the flowers are beautiful.

    in reply to: Kaparos Chilul Hashem #1592061

    slominer
    Participant

    Bris Mila is another chillul Hashem. Circumcising an eight day old baby who cannot consent to a lifetime change to his body. It’s already banned in some places. We should just drop it.

    Not to mention the chillul Hashem of metzita bpeh.

    Another chillul Hashem that needs to stop immediately is shechita. The animal must be stunned before being butchered in order to reduce its pain. So many protests against it by good Americans have already taken place.

    There are so many other chillul Hashem’s of Jewish laws and customs that, too, must be reformed.

    in reply to: Frolicking Selichos Concert #1590309

    slominer
    Participant

    Milhouse, Neville is correct. How can you possibly compare not asking the rabbonim about installing plumbing in your home to every Chaim and Yankel deciding on their own to change how we conduct our tefilos in the Beis HaKenesses?

    Seriously? You think anyone on the street can make modifications on what we do in shul without asking any Rov or Godol?!

    in reply to: Yarmulke origins #1590033

    slominer
    Participant

    laskern: That doesn’t answer the OP’s question.

    in reply to: Cars Blowing Past School Buses With Lights Flashing #1590044

    slominer
    Participant

    School restarted, another morning and another aggressive school bus driver blatantly violating driving laws and other’s right of way when he’s making left turns.

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1588853

    slominer
    Participant

    Avrom, I saw your comment in the other thread about this issue (and reference to my comments here.) I wanted to reiterate that the idea of making a song from this is only on the basis if you’re okay with songs such as shelo asani goy and songs from pesukim, brochos, parts of davening and from the Gemorah. If one in general opposes such songs, I would agree a song of shelo asani isha is to be opposed on that same basis.

    But for those who buy the popular albums from the last 60 some years that are replete with songs of brochos and pesukim, then I don’t see a difference between making this into a song and making shelo asani goy into a song (as has been done on popular albums.)

    The same intention when singing shelo asani goy at any random time of the day when not saying Birchas Hashachar, would be to thank Hashem for that purpose for that reason. For exactly the same reason Chazal included that brocha in Birchas Hashachar, and that’s your intention during Birchas Hashachar, so is your intention the same when singing it at other times. I don’t think the description of singing shelo asani goy due to “Jewish pride”, as you’ve suggested, is the most accurate description of why to sing it. It may be a partial description. But the bigger and more accurate reason to sing it ten times a day is because you are really thankful to Hashem for giving you that brocho, for the same reasons Chazal considered it a brocho that we should thank Hashem seven days a week for.

    And so too with making shelo asani isha into a song. The reason to do so is to thank Hashem anytime of the day, any number of times, for this brocho we’re thankful for, for the same reasons Chazal incorporated this brocho into Birchas Hashachar for us to thank Hashem seven days a week for. No more, no less. You don’t even need any musical instruments or anything more than simply singing it from the heart. At a tish, at a farbrengen, at a kumzits, at a melave malka or at other times.

    We could do the same about any of the brochos.

    in reply to: Cars Blowing Past School Buses With Lights Flashing #1587220

    slominer
    Participant

    The law doesn’t say that you cannot pass a moving school bus with flashing lights. But the vast majority of motorists are not experts in state traffic laws. All most of them know is that you cannot pass a school bus with flashing lights. So when an idiot bus driver is MOVING with his lights flashing, many motorists confusingly yield to the bus even though traffic law is that they should not yield, thereby disrupting the flow of traffic behind them.

    in reply to: men going to mikvah on shabbos #1586288

    slominer
    Participant

    What is the Lubavitch shitta regarding mikvos that most non-Lubavitch shittos hold makes the mikva not kosher?

    in reply to: Cars Blowing Past School Buses With Lights Flashing #1586074

    slominer
    Participant

    In a four lane street technically flashing lights doesn’t stop you from passing a moving bus, but many drivers will not pass even if the bus is driving with its lights flashing. Same when the bus is making a left turn with its lights flashing, many drivers going straight or making a right will yield even though they have the right of way, since the bus is driving with its lights flashing.

    in reply to: Cars Blowing Past School Buses With Lights Flashing #1585045

    slominer
    Participant

    I’ve seen it a lot. I assume the bus drivers put on their flashing lights while driving because they want to monopolize the road, for example when turning at intersections, by intimidating other drivers to yielding them the first right of way even when they’re not entitled to it.

    in reply to: Cars Blowing Past School Buses With Lights Flashing #1585007

    slominer
    Participant

    There is a widescale issue of school bus drivers driving with their flashing lights activated while they’re driving rather just when they’re stopped to pickup or discharge children. (Flashing lights legally means drivers cannot pass in adjac This driver abuse unfortunately causes drivers to disrespect the flashing lights.

    in reply to: How much to tip the barber for a haircut? #1584948

    slominer
    Participant

    takahmamash: With a trim or a haircut only?

    in reply to: How much to tip the barber for a haircut? #1584816

    slominer
    Participant

    On a related note, I’ve noticed that in heavily frum neighborhoods there are very few barbers. Is this because frum families are much more likely to do-it-yourself and give their children haircuts at home? (Or even the adults taking haircuts at home.)

    in reply to: Incorrigible Children #1584661

    slominer
    Participant

    Baltimore: What about a ben sorer umoreh?

    in reply to: Gemany & Amaleik #1584595

    slominer
    Participant

    The reason why Hitler ym’s never took his boots off in front of anyone is because he didn’t have human feet.

    in reply to: Shmiras einayim sunglasses and covered bus windows #1584126

    slominer
    Participant

    Why not? Doesn’t that inevitably cause inadvertently seeing inappropriate sights, which is the reason (as you said) that the Seforim say to look downwards?

    in reply to: Shmiras einayim sunglasses and covered bus windows #1584114

    slominer
    Participant

    apushtayid, thank you for the correction. When you’re walking in public and looking downwards, how much do you find your line of vision to be limited by?

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1583434

    slominer
    Participant

    CS, the reasons you’re citing not to sing it are also reasons you could equally cite why men should skip the brocho during davening. I’m arguing that the same reason why men say this brocho during davening, in appreciation to Hashem for this, is a reason why to sing this brocho anytime.

    in reply to: Shmiras einayim sunglasses and covered bus windows #1583426

    slominer
    Participant

    The Seforim say that a man should look at the ground whenever he is walking in public.

    in reply to: The Kosher Guys #1583409

    slominer
    Participant

    I don’t chap what the problem with the name Sushi Meshuga is, Mammele.

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1583338

    slominer
    Participant

    How do you decide which brochos you celebrate and which you don’t? And how have you decided in these examples that one you celebrate and the other not?

    If it is a brocho why not celebrate all? Even the asher yotzer example is something certainly worthy of celebrating for that great kindness Hashem bestows upon us everyday. Every brocho is worthy of celebrating and singing Hashem’s praises about.

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1583228

    slominer
    Participant

    Avrom, when you quoted my comment you left off the last part. That part answers your question. (Q – Shelo asani goy I can understand as Jewish pride, but why sing shelo asani isha as a song? A – the motivation [for singing would be the same motivation as] when saying the brocho itself and appreciating the reason Chazal instituted it.)

    Chabadshlucha, I also asked about it being sung at a male-only event. (I gave some examples.) Based on your comment it appears you’d see that the same as singing shelo asani goy at a Jewish-only event.

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1583161

    slominer
    Participant

    Avrom, isn’t the other song/brocho similarly offensive to a goy?

    Also, I question whether it is really offensive. The reason for the brocho is because they have more mitzvos. So why is it anymore offensive for the chazan to say the brocho in shul with the women saying Amein than for men to sing it as a song when women are around? Or, especially, to sing it when at a men-only function.

    The motivation would be the same motivation for singing shelo asani goy. Or the motivation when saying the brocho itself and appreciating the reason Chazal instituted it.

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1583121

    slominer
    Participant

    RebYidd23, good point. Singing shelo asani isha at a chasuna probably isn’t going to happen. But if Shloime Gertner, who sings shelo asani goy, sang shelo asani isha at a simchas beis hasheiva or released it on his next album or if it were sung at Yeshiva festivities or other male only functions (at a tish, Chanukah mesuba, etc.), you’d say that’s pretty much the same as singing other songs such as shelo asani goy?

    in reply to: Why do Sephardim wear a yarmulka all day? #1583100

    slominer
    Participant

    jackj123: By living in their neighborhood, working in their companies and observing them.

    in reply to: The Badeken — The origins and meaning behind the Minhag #1582681

    slominer
    Participant

    I think I overstated it about the canopy. But the veil and ring is certainly copied from us. About the white, I’m told that in Europe Jewish brides have long had the tradition to dress in white. And long before Victoria ever got married it was the default color of most Jewish brides. Perhaps Victoria was familiar with Jewish weddings and liked the white so she took it for herself thereby spreading that in the non-Jewish world.

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1582484

    slominer
    Participant

    Some of the major Jewish singers today have a song of “shelo asani goy”. If they came out with a song of “shelo asani isha” would that be any different/same or more or less offensive (or no different) than singing shelo asani goy? And, more importantly, why – given that they’re both brochos?

    in reply to: Why do Sephardim wear a yarmulka all day? #1582469

    slominer
    Participant

    Ashkenazim are more likely to be either intensely religious or intensely irreligious whereas Sephardim are more likely to be neither intensely religious nor intensely irreligious.

    in reply to: The Badeken — The origins and meaning behind the Minhag #1580889

    slominer
    Participant

    According to Jewish custom the badeken/veiling of the Kallah is only when it’s a besula.

    The Christians copied our wedding traditions such as veiling the bride, using a wedding canopy, giving the bride a ring and the bride wearing a white gown. After the Christians copied us it also spread to the non-Judeo-Christian cultures.

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1580271

    slominer
    Participant

    Chabadshlucha, can you be so kind and specifically point out which of the above cited mekoros, if any, are “distortions”. All the ones I see are legitimate. How are the cited Torah sources “belittling” in any way?!

    in reply to: Why do Sephardim wear a yarmulka all day? #1580231

    slominer
    Participant

    Toi, before they emigrated to Israel and America it was standard to not wear a yarmulka most of the day. Even though, as you pointed out, some still practice it this way, many of them switched to the Ashkenazic minhag regarding wearing a yarmulka all day. That’s what I’m wondering — why those that switched did so.

    in reply to: Why do Sephardim wear a yarmulka all day? #1580195

    slominer
    Participant

    Neville, they wore a yarmulka to shul and religious functions, but they didn’t wear it all day.

    in reply to: Why do Sephardim wear a yarmulka all day? #1580173

    slominer
    Participant

    Syrian Jews customarily were bareheaded if they weren’t in the synagogue. Even today a good portion of religious SY Jews don’t customarily wear a yarmulka most of the day.

    in reply to: Does anyone know Ruthie Pearlman’s books? #1579990

    slominer
    Participant

    What crime did Yael commit that landed her in the slammer? How long’s her sentence?

    in reply to: Shelo Asani Isha #1579942

    slominer
    Participant

    Should a woman say Amein if she hears a man make the brocho of Shelo Asani Isha? If so, why?

    in reply to: Are white skirts not tzanuah? #1568244

    slominer
    Participant

    Godolhadorah — Thank you for sharing your input on the question.

    Why davka “light pastel colors” and not dark colors or non-pas6el colors?

    Also, you refer to the common white typically worn by kallahs as “the minhag is obviously white”. Are you thus saying that, indeed, there is a bona fide longstanding minhag in Klal Yisroel for kallahs to davka wear white to the chasuna?

    in reply to: Are white skirts not tzanuah? #1568190

    slominer
    Participant

    If a kallah wore an all gray wedding dress at her chasanu, would that violate anyone’s bona fide Jewish minhag that a kallah is supposed to wear white or supposed to wear a gown according to minhag?

    in reply to: Zenni Optical Glasses #1567267

    slominer
    Participant

    How are they able to afford to sell a full frame and lens together for only $6.95?

    And how can anyone else compete with such rock bottom pricing?

    in reply to: The Badeken — The origins and meaning behind the Minhag #1567249

    slominer
    Participant

    If it is see-through then she’s isn’t “badeken”.

    Though you apparently agree that a see-through would defeat the purpose of the badeken at least according to some of the reasons for the badeken.

    On a slightly different note, is the kallah davka wearing white an official Minhag? If the kallah wore an all purple dress would that breach any bona fide Minhagim?

    in reply to: Yeshiva Tuition – question for executive directors #1565168

    slominer
    Participant

    1. What rate should be tuition be set at when a parent is unemployed and has no income?

    2. If a parent isn’t keeping up with their tuition, will the children be thrown out of Yeshiva?

    in reply to: Davening via the Mamme Rochel vs via a Tzaddik #1545232

    slominer
    Participant

    Midwest2 and Godolhadora: I presume, based on your comments, you’d never have reason to go to Kever Rochel? At least you wouldn’t go there to daven when you could easier daven in a Beis Medrash.

    in reply to: Teshuva for Retzicha #1519888

    slominer
    Participant

    WM, was hoping you’d clarify.

    in reply to: Carlebach niggunim #1518483

    slominer
    Participant

    benignuman: If you don’t accept the allegations as true, why are you bothered that others reject the veracity of the allegations and subsequently offer affirmative statements of support or celebration of the man?

    nisht: There are multiple allegations that fall into the same category as what Weinstein is accused of; to a lesser degree but unwanted activity.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 256 total)


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