Luna Lovegood

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  • in reply to: Family seperation at the border #1805687

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Part of the issue, (PART- not the entire issue), is that once these kids are separated some of them get lost in the system. many are too young give social workers any identifying details (name, age, parent’s names) and when the time comes for the parent and child to be reunited, be it in the US or back in their home country, we have no idea which kid belongs to which parent.
    Sometimes, officials don’t even know where the kid is. Some are sent detention facilities, others are sent to sponsor homes to be cared for and become unreachable.
    Imagine being told that a government official lost your kid. Even if you’ve committed a crime, once you’ve “paid you dues” you deserve to get custody of you child again (provided there was no abuse). But we can’t give these children back to their parents because we have no way of “matching” them up. That’s part of what makes this so cruel.

    in reply to: Women’s Suffrage Must End #1732129

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Neville:
    There are incompetent men, just like there are incompetent women. Stupidity is gender neutral.
    And I would love to end men’s suffrage just to troll the misogynists. Ruining a misogynist’s day is enough motivation for me to support something.

    in reply to: Women’s Suffrage Must End #1732004

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Truth:
    I think the section controlled by women would be taken seriously because they’d actually get stuff done. Men have been in control of governments all over the world for centuries and look at how much corruption and chaos exists.

    in reply to: Women’s Suffrage Must End #1731216

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Addendum: if I need a psak to vote, do I also need a psak allowing me to walk on the street? What about a psak allowing me to wear shoes? Why not a psak halacha allowing me to take off my shoes at the end of the day?
    I truly believe that halacha has a place in our lives. But I also think it’s absurd that some people need a psak halacha to tell them to get out of bed in the morning and if they can’t find a halachik source then they’ll stay in bed all day.

    in reply to: Women’s Suffrage Must End #1731215

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Phil
    Voting is an act that takes place in a secular democratic society. I don’t see why I need a psak halacha for such a thing- what could possibly be wrong with taking an active role in deciding the way policy and law are created in the city/state/country in which I live.
    Also, Joe didn’t say ” Jewish women should abstain from voting”. He thinks ALL women should be forcibly stripped of this right. And there is a world of difference between those two statements.

    in reply to: Women’s Suffrage Must End #1731131

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Men’s suffrage must end.
    After hundreds of years it’s time to recognize that the experiment has failed.
    War, violence, and destruction has been caused by men and I think it’s time we take away all of their rights and let women have a go.

    in reply to: On the Fence about Election 2020 #1710579

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Joseph-
    King has made comments defending white nationalism/white supremacy and one cannot separate white supremacy from the antisemitism since it is a major part of the ideology.
    You’ll notice that I never made any claims about King’s statements being considered acceptable within the Republican party, CA said they didn’t know of a single elected Republican who is an anti-Semite and I pointed one out.

    in reply to: On the Fence about Election 2020 #1710547

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Coffee addict-
    “I don’t know any elected republican that is anti Semitic”
    Rep. Steve King is an elected Republican that is unabashedly anti-Semitic

    in reply to: Guns #1681274

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Curiosity- I’m referring to the difference between a handgun which can hold fewer bullets and therefore hurt fewer people as opposed to a larger assault rifle type guns which can hold much larger magazines and have the capacity to hurt more people

    in reply to: Guns #1681188

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    IMHO, the best way to prevent future violence is to ban the larger guns capable of shooting multiple bullets in the span of a second or two. Smaller guns (pistols? I’m not really sure of the correct terminology) should be available to law enforcement and civilians as a means of protection as long as the gun owner has had extensive background checks and met with a psychologist to determine their mental fitness. Having a gun is a huge responsibility and shouldn’t be taken lightly

    in reply to: A letter to the OU #1403784

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    The reason I chose not to address the two men getting engaged is because I don’t anything about it and don’t feel I should comment.
    I do know, for a fact, that the OU sat down with Rabba Sarah and told her that they don’t have any issues with her daily responsibilities.
    Even if she changed her title she would still be doing the same things she is doing now. So I don’t understand why people have an issue with her title. If you don’t want want women rabbis you should protest her daily responsibilities. But the OU went over her those with her agreed that they had no problems with what she does.

    in reply to: A letter to the OU #1403768

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Arguing over her title doesn’t solve any issues. It’s semantics.
    If the OU had a theological problem with the activities and responsibilities of these women they would have said so and they would have taken action. But they didn’t.

    in reply to: A letter to the OU #1403540

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    DaMoshe- They specifically stayed away from “Rabbi” and used “Rabba” to differentiate.

    in reply to: A letter to the OU #1403278

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    “Sorry, not buying the “daas Torah” argument here.”

    You don’t have to. You also don’t have to eat food with an OU on the package, go to shuls that are part of the OU, or have anything to do with the OU. That’s your decision. And the OU made a decision to allow HIR to remain part of the organization. No one is forcing you follow their ruling. You don’t have to daven in a place that has ordained women. But if other’s do, then that’s their choice and they have poskim that they’ve discussed this issue with.

    in reply to: A letter to the OU #1403064

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    There are two issues mentioned in the original post. One is the ordination of women and second is the congratulating two men on their engagement. While I can’t speak on the second issue, I have a lot to say on the first.
    A few weeks(maybe months) ago representatives from the OU sat down with Rabba Sarah and other representatives from HIR. Together, they went over the daily duties of the female staff members and the OU came to the conclusion that the actions performed by these women are not out of line with orthodoxy. These women are proving counseling services, teaching classes, and overall doing things to better their community. They are not violating halacha and therefore have not been kicked out the of the OU. While many members on this site do not agree with Rav Avi Weiss on many issues this specific situation has been monitored by the OU and they have decided that HIR can remain part of the organization. If you don’t like it then don’t go HIR but a decision was made by people far greater than you or I.

    in reply to: Do any frum poets know how to write anything other than free verse? #1332724

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    shopping- I know of a few people who post their poetry on blogs and there is also an online journal called the Jewish Literary Journal that publishes Jewish themed pieces.

    in reply to: Do any frum poets know how to write anything other than free verse? #1332685

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    In addition to free verse(which is by far my favorite form of poetry due to it’s lack of rules and the ability of the poet to create their own structure) I’ve written haikus, sonnets, terza rima, and skeltonic poems

    in reply to: "Aliyah day" is a Zionist scam #1192300

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Do you really think your rhetoric is changing anyone’s mind? Those of us on this forum who are Zionist will not be swayed by the words of an online troll and those who are not Zionist will either agree with you or ignore you. You’re not changing anyone’s view of Zionism.

    I live in Israel, and I celebrated Aliya Day with my family. Israel is a country built by immigrants and they should be celebrated.

    While I understand why you are not a Zionist I think it’s a terrible thing to tell people who are that they are doing something wrong. Because according to our poskim we’re not.

    in reply to: Seminary Help: BY/MO, out-of-town, maybe Zionistic #1192400

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    It is time for truth- yes, they do learn without artscroll. I personally have learned a few masechtot without needing the help of an artscroll. I did use a dictionary here and there for the more difficult or less common words but for the most part I have the skills to learn on my own. And so do the women who attend these schools

    in reply to: Seminary Help: BY/MO, out-of-town, maybe Zionistic #1192390

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    It is time for truth – MMY, TVA, Lindenbaum, Nishmat, and Migdal Oz to name a few. While the specific level of each of these schools is different all these places (and more) have serious beit midrash time

    in reply to: Divorce is Worse than a Difficult Marriage #1143212

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    In many cases staying together simply isn’t an option and divorce would be beneficial to everyone involved. I grew up in a home where my parents’ personalities clashed and every single thing became a huge fight. My siblings and I wished that they would just get a divorce and end the misery. But because of the tabboo surrounding divorce they stayed married. This had a negative impact on me and my siblings and we all have trouble maintaining healthy relationships. On the outside we seemed liked a normal family and no one knew how much all of us suffered.

    I look back on that painful period in my life and can honestly say that a divorce would have been so much better than trying to “make the best of the situation”. Couples who, for whatever reasons, can’t stay married should get a divorce and ignore that nosy, nasty, judgemental people who think they know what’s best for someone else’s marriage.


    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Muslims are not the decendants of Yishmael. While ideologically they may be similar they are not genetically linked.

    in reply to: Gemara names #1132493

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Bruria is a name that’s still in use

    in reply to: Girls shouldn't go to seminary #1122982

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    This name is already taken- No. I did not go to BJJ

    in reply to: Girls shouldn't go to seminary #1122973

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Flatbusher- I worked hard in high school to get good grades which helped me get a scholarship from the school, I applied to various organizations that give girls learning in Israel scholarships, and I used some of my own money that I made from various jobs over the years.

    I really wanted my year and worked hard to make it happen. It wasn’t handed to me.

    in reply to: Girls shouldn't go to seminary #1122966

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    I went to seminary in Israel and it was an amazing experience. I learned a tremendous amount. It was nothing like summer camp. I was in class Sunday- Thursday from 8:30 in the morning to 10 at night (12 on Thursday nights for mishmar). The learning I did in seminary built on my high school education and left me with an appreciation for Torah. It was definitely not a waste of time.

    in reply to: Why do working people tend to not be as ruchniyus as Kollel people? #1176966

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    I work. I also keep halacha and make time to learn Torah. My parents work. They also keep halacha and make time to learn Torah. My grandparents work. They also keep halacha and make time to learn Torah. Please explain how we are any “less religious” just because we choose to put food on our table instead of relying on assistance from other people?

    in reply to: MODERN ORTHODOXY: The Fundamental problems #1119201

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Mentch1- You’re a hypocrite. You’re using the internet, a secular creation, and typing in English, a language based off Greek and Latin. If you truly beleive in not borrowing from other cultures why aren’t you typing in Hebrew or better yet, why are you using the internet? You can’t reprimand those who interact with secualr culture when you’re doing it too.

    in reply to: MODERN ORTHODOXY: The Fundamental problems #1119129

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Mentch1- Religiosity is a very large spectrum. The people you know who call themselves MO and the people I know who identify as MO can have vastly different levels of commitment. But as far as my experiences in a MO community I have found that a lot of my friends, teachers, and classmates had a strong commitment to halacha. They may not keep every single chumra but they do keep most halachot.

    As far as my screen name- I think that it represents what modern orthodoxy is all about. I live as a Jew in the world around me and I am able to follow halacha while still enjoying the positive parts of secular culture.

    in reply to: Do You Allow Your Spouse To Read All Your E-Mails? #1120053

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Shopping- I keep it in my email so I can access it whenever I want. No matter where I am.

    Joseph- I don’t feel it’s necessary to share everything with a spouse. Yes we are married, but we are still two distinct people. And not everything I write is meant to be shared with anyone. Be it a parent, best friend, or spouse. I’m a very private person and like to keep certain things to myself

    in reply to: Do You Allow Your Spouse To Read All Your E-Mails? #1120045

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    No, I would not allow my spouse to read every single email of mine. Not because I’m trying to hide anything sinister

    but because of the personal nature of some of my emails. I write a lot of deeply personal poetry and diary entries which I often save in my email that my spouse has no business reading

    in reply to: MODERN ORTHODOXY: The Fundamental problems #1119057

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Rabbi of Crawley- I have so many issues with your premise that I don’t even know where to begin.

    I guess a good place to start would be to let you know that I identify my practice of Judaism to be in the category of “Modern Orthodox”. My family and friends are Modern Orthodox. The high school I went to and the seminary I attended identify as Modern Orthodox. So I have a pretty good handle of Modern Orthodox hashkafa and practices.

    Modern Orthodoxy is not an attempt to ” water down” halacha. It’s the chariedim or “yeshivish” that insist on taking the halacha above and beyond the basic rules. Which isn’t a bad thing. But you can’t tell others that a chumra is halacha. I keep all the halachot that I am obligated in and take upon myself the chumrot I

    think will enhance my religious life.

    You have no right to tell me that just because my conviction in God stems from a more rational approach instead of the “just believe” approach and that I choose to live a life that interacts with tje world around me that it has any less meaning and importance.

    Also, I am a Zionist. I beleive in the State of Israel and I support it in whatever way I can. It is the only place that Jews are truly safe from persecution. In a time of real trouble it is not America, England, France or any other country that will save you. Despite what they say they all hate you for the simple reason that you were born a Jew. And when push comes to shove I beleive Israel will always be there to protect the Jewish people even when all others have abandoned us. The current religious situation is not ideal but it’s better than having no state at all.

    The Torah was given to Man and it is our job to interpret it and live by it’s rules. I do not think that one interptation within orthodoxy is any more valid than the other. It is each person’s responsibility to find the path that is right for them. And neither you or I have have any right to tell another person that the path they have chosen is wrong. Only God can judge.

    in reply to: My Sighting of the Doctor #1013933

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Bookworm120- was your doctor wearing a bow tie 😉

    in reply to: Do you have a mantra? #985938

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    “Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things don’t always soften the bad things, but vice versa, the bad things don’t necessarily spoil the good things or make them unimportant”

    in reply to: ATT POETRY PEOPLE #1168718

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Tell me it will be okay

    Tell me you’ll never go away

    Say you’ll stay by my side

    Even through the changing tide

    The moon will push

    The moon will pull

    Life may sometimes seem half full

    But promise you will never leave

    Promise that you’ll never deceive

    Say you will always stay true

    Because I really need you

    Promise you will hold my hand in the dark of night

    Promise you will be my bright and guiding light

    Even though the storms and wind try to pull me down

    In the swirling sea of life do not let me drown

    Promise to stay with me forever

    Promise our bond will never be severed

    in reply to: Text Lingo Weirdness #974845

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    A friend of mine once explained to me the “kk” thing.

    very often(at least in teenager circles) girls will say “kay” instead of “okay” which spawned the whole “kk” thing. My fried said that the number of “k”s is “proportional” to how annoyed the person is with u. 1 “k” is kind of like giving an abrupt “okay” and means the person isn’t interested in continuing a long conversation with you while “kk” is kind like the happy, chirpy “okay” and means the person u are texting isn’t annoyed with u.

    I know it doesn’t make a lot of sense but when do teenage girls ever make sense.

    in reply to: What Marriage means to you in 5 words #974949

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    How about one word – “Everything”

    in reply to: Single Girl Doesn't Wanna Cover Hair #1036094

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    The halacha is that the hair shouldn’t be seen so technically by wearing the cloak over her head the hair becomes invisible and cannot be seen. From a practical stand point it might just be easier to wear a wig or a tichel. The way the cloak would fall it would make her head look as if a large chunk had been taken out of it.

    in reply to: Post to PostNOT #1047786

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    -Shakespeare

    in reply to: Josh Groban is Jewish? #970978

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    WIY- He might not be prophet(especially since we don’t have prophecy now a days)but why would the fact that he is a non-Jew invalidate the spiritually uplifting music he has created?

    Why is it the consensus that it is better to listen to a shwekey song that carries no meaning for you than to listen to a song by Josh Groban or Simon & Garfunkel that spiritually uplifts you. Isn’t the point of music to bring you closer to G-d? Why would someone being non-Jewish or non-religious impact the force their music can have on you?

    in reply to: How do I respond to innocent questions that really hurt? #971306

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    I was in a similar situation a few years ago and when people asked me what school I was in I just told them the name of one of the many schools I had applied to. Not because I was actually enrolled but because people wanted an answer and I figured that giving one of the names of the local schools would satisfy them. Most people don’t actually care which school you are going to. They ask just to be polite and figure it is an easy way to start a conversation. If you give a name such as ‘Bais Yaakov of so and so’the average aunt, neighbor or family friend will smile, say ‘oh how nice’ and move on.

    I knew someone who came to high school in NY from either Arizona or Tennesse or something like that and had gone to public school. When people asked her which elementary school she went to she felt uncomfortable saying she had gone to public school so she made up a name that sounded legit and that was what she told everyone. The only people who knew she had gone to public school were the principals and few of the teachers and some of her close friends.

    So if you feel uncomfortable telling people you’re not in school you can either embrace it (it’s hard finding a school with the right fit but eventually you’ll get there)or if it seems easier you can make up a believable name and when you do get into school and start telling people you can tell all the people from the wedding you switched schools last minute. These are not perfect solutions but they might help for the one night of your brother’s wedding and perhaps during sheva brachos too.

    Hatzlacha!

    in reply to: Josh Groban is Jewish? #970958

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    rebdoniel- Isn’t Bridge Over Troubled Water a Simon and Garfunkel song?

    in reply to: Josh Groban is Jewish? #970952

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Josh Groban’s father is Jewish but his mother is Christian(I think one of her grandfathers was Jewish but she is not). His father “converted” to Christianity when they married and both Josh and his brother were raised as Christians. He might be considered Jewish by Reform “Jews” but he is not Jewish according to halacha.

    in reply to: Dress for Vort #969589

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Try Macy’s. They are always having sales and you could probably find something nice for a decent price. You might have to wear a shell or pencil skirt underneath since very often the dresses aren’t cut long enough. You should also try Dressbarn. They are a bit more expensive but I find their hemlines to be longer and the cut of their dresses more tznius than other brands.

    Good luck!

    in reply to: What will be the first song you listen to? #1074333

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    MCP +1! 🙂

    The first song I listened to was Scarborough Fair by Simon and Garfunkel. It is one the most beautiful tunes ever composed and I love it!

    in reply to: Would you sell the ticket? #965114

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    definitely sell. selling you get a guaranteed payout while not selling you have a one in who knows how many chance of possibly winning.

    in reply to: Post to PostNOT #1047767

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    WHO DA MAN?!

    in reply to: Post to PostNOT #1047764

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    How do you stalk a deer with a hat? What are you going to do, throw it?

    in reply to: Post to PostNOT #1047760

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    Allons-y!

    in reply to: Post to PostNOT #1047756

    Luna Lovegood
    Participant

    They are fast. Faster than you can believe.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 210 total)