Israeli Chareidi

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 43 posts - 51 through 93 (of 93 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Chareidi Draft #939219
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    zahavasdad

    Really?

    What is this welfare called?

    How come nobody I know has ever heard of it?

    in reply to: Chareidi Draft #939218
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    writersoul

    So after 2 hours in a kitchen volunteering for Ezer Mitziyon you’d need to go to the hospital and smile to all the Arab mothers in the maternity ward because the government says so.

    rkefrat

    And if the Chazon Ish would have known that the state would rip up the agreement because it’s unconstitutional (not because it’s to many people) would he have made the agreement?

    rabbiofberlin

    Do you think the soldiers don’t get paid? Do you think that someone doing national service doesn’t get a government stipend? You better believe they do. And it’s much more than the 340 NIS we saw advertised in this last election – especially when they are married with children. And the chessed organizations? The majority of the workers tend to be volunteers. Most of the paid employees are those that are unable to work a regular job because of the time required for the organization. And you can bet they don’t get union rates.

    in reply to: Chareidi Draft #939213
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    zahavasdad

    What welfare benefits? Please explain what you have in mind because as far as I know there are no special welfare benefits for chareidim.

    in reply to: Chareidi Draft #939211
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Most chareidim already do ‘national service’ in one form or another – we just call it chessed. Local neighborhood directories are filled with gemachim and chessed organizations, many of which are quite time consuming, and the government doesn’t pay a cent for it.

    The concern is not about helping out. The concern is the secular government telling us when, what, how, and with whom.

    At the founding of the state there was a deal made between b-gurion sr”y and the Chazon Ish Zt”l. They are breaking the deal.

    in reply to: Teruma Questions #930237
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    According to my son’s rebbe, the women were the first ones to donate their jewelry. I’m not sure what the source is.

    in reply to: Help With ADHD Child – Anyone Have Any Info To Help? #929712
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Try cutting down on gluten and white sugar in his diet. It doesn’t work for everyone but at a level of 3 it might make all the difference.

    in reply to: Let's Talk Tallis #926015
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Actually it is very likely that the t’cheiles was more black than it was blue. Many of the sources about t’cheiles point to that probability.

    No offence to those that claim to already be wearing t’cheiles intended.

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927111
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    The Litvishe Kiryas Yoelite

    currently the age is 28

    I think Ya’alon wants to lower it to 26

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927103
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    In addition, the majority of kollelim are funded by American dollars directly injected into the Israeli economy.

    in reply to: How Much Money Does the Israeli Government Give to Kollel Families? #927100
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    It’s a little complicated but here is the best that I know.

    Anyone learning in a registered yeshiva or kollel during both the morning an afternoon is entitled to “datot” money. This means that the yeshiva receives a stipend on his behalf. If the man is not married the yeshiva may keep the stipend of around 500-600 Shekel. If he is married it is passed on to him through the yeshiva/kollel and it is around 800-900 Shekel monthly. If the man is not a Israeli citizen the above amounts are somewhat less. This is not connected at all to financial status.

    If one has at least 3 children, no car, and his wife does not work. He is entitled to an additional payment (I can’t remember what it’s called right now) of between 1000-2000 Shekel monthly. This is also conditional on the fact that he only learns all day (not a rebbe, tutor, etc.) and has less than a certain monthly income.

    The above 2 payments come in towards the beginning of the month and are for the previous month. The one exception is that December’s stipend (which is supposed to arrive at the beginning of January) is always delayed and often shrunk pending the passing of the new budget for the year. Somehow I have a feeling the soldiers do not have that problem.

    There are additional subsidies that are available to any citizen with a low income.

    Between 40%-90% discount on property tax (a municiple tax levied on the resident).

    Little or no income tax – and in rare instances a monthly tax benefit (between 0-470 shekel).

    One who works must pay a 10% health tax while one who doesn’t pays 112 shekel monthly.

    Any resident receives around 150 shekel monthly per child – regardless of financial status.

    Although soldiers and policemen get free public transportation, and students receive a 50% discount, members of yeshivas and kollelim receive no discount at all.

    If I think of anything else I’ll try to add it.

    in reply to: Dating; Important Question #913761
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Be careful to differentiate between “addict” and “social user”. A social user is one who falls in to the wrong crowd and uses drugs (usually marijuana or pharmaceuticals) occasionally. This person, though ‘experienced’, is not likely to crave a drug if he’s sufficiently passed it. An addict, on the other hand, is always an addict (this applies to all addictions – alcohol, drugs, ice cream, etc.). Though he may be in recovery for many years, he is still in danger of relapse.

    Please be extremely careful about this.

    Even if the shidduch is not for you in the end anyway, be careful not to ‘spread the word’ (even l’to’eles) that someone is an addict if he may really only be someone who made some really bad choices a few years back.

    I am not a psychologist, but I do have experience with teens who are or have dabbled in these dangerous waters.

    in reply to: Not wearing a tie at Mincha on Shabbos #944919
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Shmendrik

    “I am considering instituting this minhag among my chaburah but would appreciate input from the hamon am.”

    1)Why would you want to institute a new minhag at all?

    One who has a minhag should keep to it.

    The exception being: one who has no minhag or knows that it was lost.

    2)If the case where the adoption of a new minhag is indeed warranted, why would you decide based on the opinion of the hamon am? I would suppose a close rebbie or rav would be a more appropriate address.

    Minhagim are not to be trifled with. Chanuka should remind us that during a time of shmad one must give up his life even for the sake of a minor minhag.

    in reply to: Hoadoma corn #1019958
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Who’s the father of corny Jokes?

    Pop Corn

    in reply to: Succah on Shmini Atzeres #898877
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    42:

    Take a look at the Sfas Emes on the topic. You’ll find he didn’t just go in from the cold.

    in reply to: Girls are more mature than boys #1064925
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    I think it is more accurate to say that women reach what can be described as their full maturity at an earlier age than men reach what can be described as theirs.

    in reply to: Keeping tzitzit tucked in #902501
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    try a longer pair for those ‘dressing down’ days

    in reply to: Yerusha #884164
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Choppy: The B’chor for yerusha follows the father. Thus, even if a man has remarried and has had more children with the second wife there will still be only one B’chor for yerusha. For Pidyon Haben, the b’chor follows the mother. Thus, subject to various birthing conditions, a man can have a new b’chor each time he marries a different woman. I don’t mean to sound crass or insensitive – I’m just trying to be very clear.

    in reply to: Rav Chaim Pinchos Scheinberg & Baseball #867079
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    zahavasdad & DJHocker:

    When I was younger I used to daven in a shul full of frum people and there were close to 200 of them who talked during chazoras hashatz.

    Don’t judge Judaism by the Jews – judge Judaism by the Torah and Halacha. (paraphrased from R’ Asher Wade)

    in reply to: Yiddishe Chasuna?!? #864584
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    I think that part of the reason for the wayward slide away from the kedusha appropriate for a wedding is that people started going to weddings to have a good time and enjoy THEMSELVES – instead of the challenging mitzvah of being happy TOGETHER with the chosson and kallah.

    The choice of music and the way in which it is played greatly influences in which direction a person will channel his/her energies when attending a wedding.

    in reply to: Toch Sheloshim Yom #943813
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Actually, based on R’ Avigdor Miller’s History series (all sourced from the gemoroh and midrashim) the actually running of the country was left up to the sanhedrin – except for the occasional, though severe, interference.

    Governments have been known to allow Jews religious freedom throughout the golus, both in E”Y and the diaspora.

    My only question was whether the Ramba”n would recognize our E”Y as the one to which such a havtacha applies – this seeming to be the only basis for turning the establishment of the State of Israel into a celebration.

    in reply to: Toch Sheloshim Yom #943811
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Actually, even during the reign of the reshaim of Bayis rishon and sheini klal Yisroel was under the direct leadership of the sanhedrin – not the Israeli Supreme Court.

    in reply to: Toch Sheloshim Yom #943807
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Sam2

    Interesting post – and gematriya.

    But what would the Ramba”n consider Jews controlling E”Y?

    Today E”Y is not controlled by Jews, it is controlled by people who happen to be Jewish.

    If the British PM in 1945 had been Jewish would that count as well?

    R’ Elchonon Wasserman HY’D wrote that the irreligious Jews who take charge of the nation (in those days the Yevsektzia – same people, different name) in the end of days are to be considered from the seed of Amalek. I don’t claim to know what that means but would the Ramba”n accept their leadership as qualifying for the havtacha.

    In addition, many of the events leading up to the final geulah mentioned in the Navi are rather frightening. Are we to celebrate a bloody war even if we could positively confirm that it is a necessary part of the geulah?

    in reply to: Toch Sheloshim Yom #943804
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Why do people feel the need to celebrate an expulsion of Jews from Yerushalayim and surrounding areas – not to mention the loss of thousands of lives as a result?

    in reply to: Acharon Shel Pesach / Shabbos / Gebroks #863173
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Just to clarify, the reason I used the term most people in referring to those who use machine matzoh for the larger part of the week is because I am involved in matzoh production here in the holy land and have found that most people who order matzoh order just enough hand-made for the seder and order machine-made for the rest of the holiday.

    Also, I have been involved in the alternative-grain matzoh scene both hand and machine. I can tell you that those who require gluten-free oat matzoh should check each individual matzoh for hollow areas containing unbaked flour. Gluten-free oat dough is extremely tough and sticky and the machines that usually do a great job on wheat or spelt have a hard time with the oats. In addition, although any flour residue found on the outside of the matzoh has been heated far past the point of being ever able to rise, unmixed flour that is trapped inside a dough is shielded from the heat and can easily pose a problem – it is still white.

    PS I eat gebrochts – it’s chumra on oneg yom tov

    in reply to: Acharon Shel Pesach / Shabbos / Gebroks #863132
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    farrocks:

    I don’t know what the Chofetz Chaim did in his home but he does discuss in the Mishnah Berurah about eating knaidlach on erev pesach afternoon. He does not mention any minhag of avoiding wet matzah over there. Also, keep in mind that the minhag of avoiding wet matzah was enacted concerning hand matzah. Those who decided to be stringent never saw the machine kneaded wheat matzos most people use for the larger portion of the holiday.

    in reply to: "Come hereóI want to see you" #860227
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    AinOhdMilvado:

    And it’s because he had just spilled battery acid all over his leg. He didn’t even realize that the line was active. He was just shouting for help.

    in reply to: Eating before Shacharis dilemma #948556
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    How do you access this timetable?

    I have been searching for it for a flight – without success.

    in reply to: stupid people! #854255
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    ZeesKite – this is correct.

    It’s for this reason that we don’t process gitten on the first day of a two-day R”Ch. If the date on the get is inaccurate then it doesn’t work and it’s a sofek whether to write lamed shevat or day one of rosh chodesh adar.

    in reply to: Whose Minhagim to follow!?! #851496
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    The wife takes on her mother’s minhagim regarding the mitzvos that are primarily her’s – T’villa, Hafrashas Challah, Hadlokas Neiros.

    in reply to: Appalling attitude of smokers. #847610
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    A ‘law’ has been passed. In R’ Moshe’s responsum on the topic of smoking he says quite clearly that if it bothers someone else it is ASSUR to smoke in their vicinity.

    in reply to: seuda shlishis after shabbos? #844342
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Sam2: I see your point. I guess this is in need of further research. Thanks for the motivation.

    in reply to: seuda shlishis after shabbos? #844340
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    crazybrit: Why does it matter which week you’ve extended Shabbos into? Why should bringing it in early be different than letting it out late?

    (This idea is actually mentioned a few times in the zemiros – originally from the Gemoro, I believe.)

    in reply to: seuda shlishis after shabbos? #844337
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Sam2: Why do you think there is a difference? Please explain.

    in reply to: seuda shlishis after shabbos? #844333
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    It’s called Tosefes Shabbos. You can make kiddush and even complete the Friday night meal all before shkia as well.

    in reply to: Fear of Flying: Rational? #819086
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Actually, Rav Ahron Kotler Zt”l was extremely terrified of flying. Though he flew often, he would usually absorb himself in his learning from begining to end.

    On one occasion he was telling over a shiur to another talmid chochom on the flight. After about 2 hours after take-off, when he finished discussing the shiur, he chanced a look out the window. Not realizing that they had taken off, he shrieked out an “OY!” and quickly opened a sefer.

    I think we all agree that he did not have an emunah issue.

    Perhaps the afformentioned Rav was refering to a logical fear of the dangers of flying as opposed to the more illogical phobias.

    in reply to: why are they freeing gilad?? #817424
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    There may also have been some intelligence (i.e. information) issues involved that we may never know about – it might explain why some of the ministers were informed at the last minute. There may have been some really dangerous things at stake if the deal wasn’t pulled off now. Also might explain why the cabinet vote was so one-sided.

    in reply to: can someone please explain? #817298
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Perhaps he is a baal tshuva who is slowly taking on more observance. This might be one of the things he is working on now – his rav might have suggested this as a method of steady growth.

    Especially since he kissed it when he put it in his pocket. I’ve never heard a halachic reason for that even if it falls on the floor. Anyone?

    Either ways, this fellow is probably someone who can use a friend regardless of what his reasons are – why don’t you say hi next tie you see him?

    in reply to: Is it mutar to tie a string to the schach? #816117
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    *long comment*

    The main problem is that there is a g’zeira not to support/hold (ma’amad) the schach with something that is itself not kosher schach because chaza”l were afraid you will come to rely on that item for schach itself. They did, however, allow one to support the supports (ma’amad d’ma’amad) with such an item.

    In general, string, cable-ties, wire, etc. cannot be used to support the schach and therefore if one isonly concerned with an abnormal wind so he may loosely tie it as it is not actually doing the job of supporting the schach during normal conditions.

    If one is concerned that a regular wind will blow off the schach then this would not be permissible. There are 2 solutions to this problem:

    a) Use the “woody” string that they use for holding together the schach mats – sometimes sold seperately. It is a meterial that is technically kosher for schach. This is cheap but not that strong.

    b) Place wooden supports directly on top of the schach in the same place as the supports under the schach with the schach sandwiched in between. Now you can tie the upper and lower supports together with whatever you want as this is ma’amad d’ma’amad.

    P.S. According to the Chazon Ish, one should preferably not rely on ma’amad d’ma’amad. But it is kosher nevertheless. (He would have made a brocho in a “non-Chazon Ish” sukka.)

    in reply to: Avodah Zaroh in Nail Salons #810558
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Even if they do not consider their work as serving AZ it may still be problematic to go there as they may be attributing your business to their AZ (see maseches AZ). And even if they don’t, you may need to research when they have their holidays because then they probably do.

    in reply to: Teenage Boys and older chewing gum on the street #801589
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    There’s nothing wrong with chewing gum on the street – just make sure that you crawl on all fours and say moo.

    Otherwise – as Harav Menashe Klien Shlit”a said (he was being asked about chewing powder gum on shabbos – which many poskim have said is an issur de’oiraisa of Losh), “Is such a thing muttar during the week?!?”

    It is simply not honorable for a human being to do it.

    They used to say (in the days when it was applicable) if it’s too demeaning for the president to do in public then a Jew is definitely far beyond such things.

    That’s also why it’s not tznius. Tznius is about being a tzelem elokim above all the other creatures of the earth. True, we must eat – but we don’t need to chew our cud.

    in reply to: TEXTING ON SHABBOS #815421
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    Putting aside the shabbos aspects, because I don’t know how direct, etc. this is, all processors produce sparks. This is why computers tend to generate alot of heat. I don’t know anything about the insides of these new machines, but unless they’ve invented a new way of doing processing there are still sparks going on, however minute.

    in reply to: Gebruchts #760745
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    The minhag of not eating gebrochts comes from the fact that there is a chance that there is some flour that didn’t get properly kneaded into the dough and got trapped in an air pocket causing it to stay ‘chametzable’ until it reaches the soup. It is a very unlikely scenario which is why the halocho is that we do not need to worry about it. Never the less, throughout the generations there have always been minhagim that certain communities have adopted to display for themselves the seriousness of chametz – even if they didn’t make so much intellectual sense. (e.g. “don’t put that case of chickens on the floor – my mother was always careful to put it on the counter). Many of these minhagim stuck and the poskim always respected them even if they didn’t practice them themselves.

    I, personally, eat gebrochts. But alot of time spent in various matzo factories – both hand and machine – has shown me that the possibility of free flour that hasn’t been properly kneaded or exposed to the high heat is much higher than most people think.

    In addition – anyone who does put gebrochts in a utensil of someone who is makpid is probably being oiver on gezel.

    in reply to: Kosher Subway #738593
    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    What happened to the halocho of stuffing your face with a large portion of food at once?

    In my Shulchan Oruch it says that stuffing your face with a sub, shawarma, falafel, or pizza of large proportions is an act of gluttony which must be avoided (except on Shabbos).

    This applies no matter which company is making the profit.

Viewing 43 posts - 51 through 93 (of 93 total)