CTRebbe

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  • in reply to: How girls are causing the shidduch crisis! #1832468

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I do not want to discount the point point made by the OP. I am sure that it is true that there are many people who reject proposed shiduchim (or after a date) for ridiculous reasons. It is likely that very often these rejections could be from the parents with twisted hashkafos who are messing up their kids lives.

    However, we don’t always know the whole story and very often assumptions are made that are just not true. It could be that the rejections come for valid reasons. For example, if a girl feels she needs a boy currently in Yeshiva and you are working (your title gives that one away) then that is a valid reason to reject a proposal based on HER requirements. You may be a much higher quality yarei shomayim and better catch than the guy in Yeshiva who misses minyanim and sleeps through half of seder, but that is not what she is looking for. It could be some girls feel they need a guy taller than her in order to respect him (BTW they say that R’ Ahron Kotler’s wife was a head taller than him. She did not need the physical height since everything else about him more than made up for it)

    We also need to remember when it comes to shidduchim something that is true in all parts of life. Hashem runs the world and will determine when we find our proper zivug. We need to do our hishtadlus and daven but it is silly for us to say “the reason that I am not married is that I went to a co-ed high school and girls are rejecting me.” Your job is to do your best job as a Jew and when you get rejected thank the One above for keeping you away from a machshefa who could ruin your life. If you and your roommates are great guys, the world will recognize that. There are a ton of girls (and their parents) who are probably reading this and saying “how do I get these boys?!”

    in reply to: The constant protests in eretz yisroel need to be addressed. #1832004

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Why are posters assuming that it is true that gedolim support protesting? How many gedolim support protesting vs. how many have spoken out against it? Please show me which gedoilm support these protesters. I would be very curious to see the list.

    Reb Eliezer’s comparison to the Chasam Sofer makes absolutely no sense and proves nothing.

    in reply to: dirshu siyum was 80% chassidish, understanding why? #1832002

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Joseph is guilty of using his own experience in thinking that what he sees in the world around him is all there is. It is a common mistake but not actually based on anything real. The only real census that I know of that can demonstrate the percentage of Chadish Jews of the Orthodox in America is the census by Dr. Marvin Schick of all day school students in America. If you do the math, the chadish are actually 37.7% of the Orthodox. This study was done in 2013. Even given the current population growth in all segments (the yeshivishe and chabad is also quite high) it will not come close to the 60% assumed by Joseph. My guess is that Joseph is not counting Chabad in his category of Chasidish. You read the entire study here

    A Census of Jewish Day Schools in the United States – 2013-14 (2014)

    While it is true that there is large population growth in areas such Kiryas Yoel, Williamsburg and Boro Park, my guess is that Joseph has not been to areas outside the Orthodox enclaves he is familiar with. Try visiting

    the five towns, Teaneck, Baltimore, Los Angeles, Chicago, South Florida, Cleveland, Far Rockaway, Queens, Atlanta, Detroit, Crown Heights, Silver Spring, etc.

    In case you are wondering, yes, Dr. Schick’s study does include ALL the chasidishe yeshivos. He is extremely thorough.

    in reply to: Torah hashkafah on having midwinter vacation #1828382

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I think most (although apparently not all) will agree that some form of break is necessary. Obviously the amount of break that is necessary is different for each person but we should be able to agree on what is a reasonable average. I think what has not yet been addressed is whether or not we should be following the schedule established 150 years ago in Europe when the modes of transportation were much different than today. Perhaps the main reason why yeshivos in those days gave off for the whole month of Nisan is that it could take a bachur a full week to travel by horse/ train etc. until he reached his shtetel. It was not practical to give off an extended weekend in the middle of the winter and instead they just gave off for 3-4 weeks in Nisan, Av and Tishrei.
    Perhaps we should recognize the change in realities today and give off for an extended weekened in the winter and less dead time in Nisan and Tishrei.

    in reply to: Smartphones in Mir Diras are getting crazy #1826544

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Apparently the main issue that people have with smartphones is the fact that they have internet access. It makes me wonder how all the people posting here did that without going on the internet. Maybe they asked their neighbors who have internet to post for them?

    in reply to: World Zionist Congress elections #1826377

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Looks like it is very important to vote. I saw that Rav Asher Weiss, Rav Yitzchak Berkowitz and Rav Elya Brundy have all encourage people to vote. My questions are

    1. Which party closest represent the Chareidi community ? Is it Eretz Hakodesh?

    2. Is there any organization out there that is offering to fund the $7 sign-up fee? I know its relatively small but hey, every little bit helps.

    in reply to: A Third of Israeli Youth Don’t Enlist in the IDF #1824782

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Joe- I asked you for a source. Where is this record? I am not arguing with you I just want to learn more (Isn’t that why everyone checks out the YWN coffee room?)

    The article from Rav Melamed is fascinating. The man writing the letter seems to be discussing his personal experience which would seem to be a very credible source. However Rav Melamed seems to shoot him down by saying “As for the allegations themselves, at least half of them are inaccurate, and the rest are only a half, a third, or a quarter accurate”

    in reply to: A Third of Israeli Youth Don’t Enlist in the IDF #1824654

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Joe- What is your basis to say that the Israeli army has too many conscripts?

    in reply to: A Third of Israeli Youth Don’t Enlist in the IDF #1824509

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Israel is very different from the US and all other countries that have volunteer armies. The US population is 331 million and Israel is 9 million of which only 3/4 are Jewish. The natural threat to Israel of its neighbors is not an issue to be minimized. The only reason why Ben Gurion initially agreed to the deferment for yeshiva students is bec. it was a minute number (400). Think one corner of the Mir. Since then it has increased 15,000%.
    To make the issue of the army as “they just want to shmadzach our shevet Levi” is not accurate. It is not realistic to expect the burden of conscription to be placed on a population that will eventually become the minority. I think the issue needs to be addressed from all sides without the basis of “that is the way it has always been done”.
    True, I did not sign up for the US armed forces but that is bec. they can manage without me as we see. If that reality changed and it became necessary to conscript I would not fight it. I would not want to go but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. I don’t like to pay taxes or jury duty and try to get out of both in any legal way. But I also realize that there are some things that are unavoidable. I don’t look at the the IRS as a bunch of Nazis trying to take away my religious freedom.

    in reply to: The End of the Ashkenaz Community in Flatbush #1824252

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I did not mean to be harsh and flipant regarding the difficulties in moving. Yes, moving for anybody is a stressful undertaking. But the OP and several articles I have read make it sound like a tragedy that Brooklyn is losing its youth to Lakewood. This OP was actually more hopeful by saying that the sefradim are staying. It would be great if the sefardim take over all the shul, yeshivot and mikvaot that the ashkenazim built! No issues of selling to churches and the like and it is keeping everything in the family. Wouldn’t be anything wrong if they gave them away to sfardim bec. all the ashkenzazim left!

    1- No we care more about a lot of things besides grass. But that does not mean that there is a be advantage of seeing more asphalt and cement. If Jews would say “we really don’t care much about gashmiyus and expensive houses. We will focus on ruchninyus and live in a neighborhood that is ugly and unpleasant and not spend our hard earned money on extravagant neighborhoods.” However, that is not the case. Instead, the Jews 30-40 years ago chose the worst of both worlds- unpleasant neighborhoods that you need to pay a fortune for the privilege of living there. One day the kids wake up and say “hey the emperor has no clothes!” Why in the world should we kill ourselves to make ends meet and pay fortunes of money to live in cramped overcrowded conditions? “. And then the old folks scratch their heads and say “gee I don’t know why the young folk don’t want to live here anymore.” (Duh)

    Kol hakavod to the younger generation for waking up and breaking out of the mindset of we need to live in Brooklyn. Unfortunately that has been replaced with the mindset of we need to live in Lakewood. Until of course their kids grow up, move out to ___ and the cycle starts all over again.

    in reply to: The End of the Ashkenaz Community in Flatbush #1824169

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I am not understanding some of the posters here- there is no shame in making Brooklyn Judenrein (if it really did come to that). Did you ever think that Jews did not belong there in the first place? Helloooo-its galus, not the promised land. Do you really think G-d needs more Jews in Flatbush vs. Wichita vs, Cracow vs. Alexandria? For some reason a bunch of Jews chose that as their home (proximity to Manhattan?) and it became the place to be. Yes we invested a ton of money in infrastructure. But we also invested a ton of money in shuls and mikvaos in Poland. Is anyone suggesting we go back there to take advantage of it? I can think of a much greater connection Vilna or Lublin but I don’t see Orthodox Jews moving there in droves. Do you ever think how much R. Meir Shapiro invested in Yeshivas Chachmei Lublin and how many years we got out of it?

    Economics is a reality and so is progress. From a pure dollars and sense standpoint is it better for 1,000 Jews to spend $1,000,000 on a small uncomfortable home in an ugly neighborhood with crazy traffic with infrastructure in place (which also needs money in upkeep) or move to a newer cheaper neighborhood and rebuild the infrastructure all over again?

    Regarding the Bubbies and Zaidies who are still left there, let them get over the nostalgia, sell your your home for a fine profit and move near your kids (assuming they want you there) . Sell it to whoever is crazy enough to NEED that area and find greener pastures. Hopefully you will find them in E”Y but at the very least you can use the money to retire comfortably.
    Regarding the rest of the Jews who are still there and may kvetch about smaller class sizes and higher tuition-try moving out and break the vicious cycle. Which is a bigger challenge, dealing with a few less kids in the class or needing to pay all of your staff higher salaries to keep up with the insane cost of living? How many Rabbeim can live a comfortable normal life in Brooklyn with one one job? Two jobs? If none then we have built an unsustainable system and it is time to dismantle it.

    Last one out turn off the lights.

    in reply to: A Third of Israeli Youth Don’t Enlist in the IDF #1824123

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    1. A significant factor of increased exemptions is likely due to the population growth of the chareidim vs. chilonim.
    2. Perhaps the declining interest in the secular youth enlisting is also due in large part to the chareidim. They may think “If they don’t serve, why should I?”

    3. Do you really want an 18 year with mental health issues to be walking around the streets of Israel 24/7 with a loaded assault rifle?

    4. Why does it not bother you that there is an increase in mental health issues amongst your brethren?

    5. It looks like the 33% includes the chareidim.

    6. Dou you really think that they would just let people off bec. they claim to have mental health issues without a letter from a mental health professional?

    7. Isn’t this more of a reason for chereidim to look for viable ways to work with the IDF to join the ranks of nachal chereidi if the secular will not join? If the chareidim will eventually become the majority in Israel they can’t realistically expect a minority of secular to be the only ones serving.

    Stop making this an us vs. them issue without looking for for ways to address the problem.

    in reply to: The End of the Ashkenaz Community in Flatbush #1823559

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Kollelman-why do think we need long term solutions other than what you mentioned? There is no mitzvah of Yishuv haaretz in Brooklyn. Why not just sell properties for a huge profit, pick and move somewhere else (preferably E”Y) and call it a day (or a century). Is there any reason to try and save the Ashkenazi Brooklyn community. Nostalgia is nice but should not prevent life from moving forward.

    in reply to: Strange conversation about attacks on Jews? #1822183

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Perhaps a more productive way to address this issue would be to speak with the boy’s principal and share with him your ideas of what lessons should be shared with the students. It is very possible that the school spoke at length about it but it did not affect your son.

    It is not not strange for a 12 year old to not care about any communal issue especially if it will not have any effect on the video game he plans to play that afternoon.

    Do you remember being a community activist at age 12?

    in reply to: MO Daf Yomi #1819701

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Gemera is not trief to women. If it was all Bias Yaakov and seminaries would not be able to quote to the girls any gemaras which is obviously impossible.
    The gemara that talks about tiflus is saying that we do not create a system in which we emphasize, encourage,cajole etc. the learning of Torah shebeal peh to girls like we do to boys. If they want to learn it on their own that is their business.

    So to break it down- the maggid shiur is doing nothing wrong. He is just giving his regular shiur and the women join.

    The women are doing nothing wrong, they have a thirst for Torah. Don’t knock it.

    The other male attendees are doing nothing wrong as long as the gidrei tznius are in place (requiring a mechitza is ridiculous but if everyone is OK with that that is their business)

    So too add it all up-yes it is a good thing bec. more Torah is being learned by klal yisrael.

    If it was a high school requiring girls take a certain amount of gemara classes to graduate that would be a different story.

    So paskens the Rebbe of CT

    in reply to: MO Daf Yomi #1819392

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    You need to clarify your question. Are you questioning the maggid shiur, the women attendees, the men attendees or all of the above. Please be aware that all responses an comments to this thread will be read by members of the MO community, the Non_Orthodox community as well as the Chareidi community and the world at large.

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1816116

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Apparently the organizers of the siyum pay attention to the discussions on the YWM coffee room. Only one Yiddish speech yesterday.

    Based on my survey of the participants in Met Life stadium
    .3% speak Yiddish as their primary language and do not understand much English
    2.6% speak Yiddish as their primary language but are just as comfortable with English
    33.2% speak English as their primary language and are somewhat comfortable with Yiddish
    63.4% speak English as their primary language and do not understand much Yiddish
    .5% Other

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1804775

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Well, gee wilikers- I”ll be darned.

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1804686

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Any decent speaker must understand his crowd. BMG is not met life stadium.

    Rav Pam was quite fluent in Yiddish and perhaps even more so than English (I was not zoche to spend time with him) . I do know that when he spoke at a Torah Umesorah conference where the overwhelming majority were Orthodox teachers and principals he addressed every single person in the room. Not only did he speak in English but if he said a Hebrew or Yiddish word or phrase he would translate it. Up the word “menorah” which he figured the attendees knew what a menorah was. Everything else was translated. In my mind, that is gadlus. Taking into account the people in your audience.

    If there is a gathering for the siyum hashas in Israel I would not expect the speeches to be in English. However if they do make the speeches in Yiddish instead of Hebrew they will be sending a message of “if you are not chareidi, go home. You are not welcome here..”

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1804663

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I do not recall anyone giving a speech in Ivrit at the last siyum.

    Rational- I am sure that Yiddish is a lovely language and there would be a minimal benefit to learning it. I think the time investment to do so is not worth it. I think I could learn how my car works in less time and there is a lot more practical benefit to learning that skill.

    Are there any gedolim alive today that do not speak either fluent English or Hebrew as a primary language?
    30 years ago there were. Today, unfortunately, they are gone. Time to realize we live in a different world and get wth the program.

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1804572

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    R’ Dovid- I could maybe hear your point from our perspective. However from the perspective of a speaker how could he take on that responsibility of wasting thousands of people’s time? Let’s say half the people there are not so comfortable with Yiddish or don’t understand it at all. Those 20 min are = to 15,000 hours wasted. It’s hard to hear one speaker get up and talk about the importance of limud hatorah and the value of time and the next gets up with a shotgun and blows away 15,000 hours of human life.

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1804350

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    The kitzur shulchan aruch was written in Hebrew. It could be a Yiddish translation was later made but that is simply a translation.
    All this is irrelevant. What is relevant is this : what is the spoken language of 90-95% of the siyum hashas participants on Jan 1 2020 in Met life stadium. The spoken language o Jews in various countries over the millennium is an interesting discussion but this is not the place for it.
    If indeed the amount of Yiddish speeches corresponds to the percentage of people in Met life stadium who primarily speak that language and have difficulty understanding English then I back down and stand corrected.

    in reply to: Important things to know before choosing camp for your daughter #1803118

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Boruch- what do you mean “It cant be all about money.” ? Do you really think anyone opens a girls camp with the intention of giving young women a summer experience that they can not receive anywhere else? Of course the focus is on making money. Its a business. Saying otherwise would be like trying to pretend girls seminaries in Israel open with the primary objective of giving an educational experience.

    These are two areas where it seems clear “it’s all about the benjamins baby”.

    in reply to: Should a bochur have a beard? #1802708

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I don’t think Joseph, Charlie Hall and chabadshalucha could be the same person. No one could have that much time on their hands to make all those comments. Unless of course he/she is paid employees of YWN who writes all day in the coffee room to give it more life and get people upset.

    Hmmmm

    in reply to: After millions spent on promotion why are 30% of seats unsold? #1800074

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Joseph- How many other expenses do know of that have gone up in price 600% in the last 30 years? Perhaps Haimy has a point that there is more going on here than just covering the expenses.

    in reply to: After millions spent on promotion why are 30% of seats unsold? #1799946

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    According to Dr. Heilman the seats on the floor for the 9th siyum went for $100. A bargain compared to $600

    in reply to: After millions spent on promotion why are 30% of seats unsold? #1799941

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Y’all might want to keep in mind that the average NFL player earn $2.7 million a year with 53 players. Don’t look at the value of a football game vs. a siyum. Look at their expenses.

    Also consider we do not know if indeed a full 30% are not yet sold just bec. those categories are not yet sold out.

    Maybe some people are turned off by all the Yiddish speeches?

    Yiddish at Siyum hashas

    (It a joke. Ok everybody, just a joke)

    in reply to: Boys Learning in Eretz Yisroel #1798309

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I think the biggest reason for both boys and girls is for them to experience the types of families who live on a whole different existence than those in the US. The yiras shomayim and idealism is something that you can only absorb by living with such people for an extended period of time, going to their house for shabbos etc. It is immersion in that environment which can have life-changing effects (although it is not automatic). There are no metrics for what I am talking about. Either you get it or you don’t.

    The second-biggest reason to experience E”Y not as a tourist but as someone living there. It’s the kind of thing you can do by staying in a hotel for 10 days and going on a tour bus.

    Obviously one needs to understand where your kid is holding to determine if the risks are worth the possible reward. Giving some kids independence without supervision can be negative.

    in reply to: Keeping the Siyum Hashas Sacred. #1796512

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I think what is bothering Haimy in regards to the fundraising aspect is that it seems to project to bring in much more money than the cost of the event. I think that is a valid point but my hope is that the extra cash raised is used for promoting limud daf hayomi for the entire 7.5-year cycle. It seems that they are also trying to use this an opportunity to promote limd hatorah in general which is, of course, a worthwhile cause.
    I have a bigger issue with organizations that charge full price or more for their products (tisha b’av films, books etc.) and then raise tons of money is donations to sponsor each event to the hilt. Granted the question is more on th donors but it does make one think.

    in reply to: Following Halacha #1795495

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Let us try to dan lekaf zechus and say that those who daven at a late hour are busy with hachana for two hours. Do any of the chasidic sources say that hachana needs to start at a late hour? Would they not agree that if you know you are going to need that much time for hachana then just start your day early?

    It also does not answer how this practice deals with missing the zman tefila. Even if you can say that bedieved the tefila works there is no question that they lose the schar for zman tefila.

    How did zman tefila become the OK thing to fudge for Orthodox Jews,? The issue is not so much the fact that some people wake up late and try to justify it. The issue seems to be more in the INSTITUTIONALIZING of it. Many from jews speak badly about reform and conservative Judaism (and rightly so) for also institutionalizing the disregard of various halachos. How is this any different?

    in reply to: Following Halacha #1794614

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Don’t say I didn’t warn you all that the whole post was pure trolling. Notice that the poster claimed to be discussing halacha as if he/she sincerely would like to admonish his fellow Jews about clear cut halacha and then gives three examples of issues that are not clear cut halacha.
    Even if it is in the Mishnah brurah, if the MB is discussing something based on societal norms, one can not honestly claim that it is “halacha” that is not subject to debate.

    in reply to: Following Halacha #1793810

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Not sure if the whole posting is a troll ( the question about jacket and hat as halacha sure sounds suspicious). I think a point that a few other posters have forgotten is that the mitzvah to rebuke someone is only if they are going to listen and the goal is to increase kovod shomayim. It is not just ” I do my part and whether you listen is your problem”. It could be that even if your ebuke is based on solid unquestionable halacha it will accomplish absolutely nothing other than giving you a chance to blow off steam For example, telling certain Orthodox sects that they are praying shachris after the correct time. It could also cause damage and a tremendous chilul Hashem. For example if a tinok shenishbah is told that they are violating shabbos, depending how it is done can be really damaging.
    One must use their seichel to determine what will accomplish the greatest good

    in reply to: Audio Shiurim sites #1783177

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    torahdownloads.com

    in reply to: Should Wedding gowns for the extended family be discontinued? #1781078

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I think people are misunderstanding the concept of takkanos today at least in the non-Chassidic world. The idea is not necessarily that there is an evil in our midst which needs to be expunged. It is more that the peer pressure of society allows us to be sucked into many mishugasin which become very difficult to stop once they are started. It is extremely unreasonable to expect people to have the strength to fight against it on their own. The idea of takknos says “Hey we all agree that this is ridiculous and that it is killing us. Can we as a community all agree to cut it out?” Then the Rabbis sign their name to it as if to say congratulations for having some sense.

    This gowns thing is a perfect example. All these kallahs who “suggest” the color that everyone should wear is in a sense pressuring families to tack on one more unnessary expense in addition to the headache of finding the “right” gown. All we need to do is tell the kallahs to cut it out. Don’t suggest anything and instead please just tell your frinds and relatives to come as you would like. Have your fun in some other way that does not harm anyone. No threats ordecrees are necessary. Just someone to speak up and say enough already!

    in reply to: learning from an artscroll #1766291

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I think at the root of the question lies the issue of what are the goals of a bachur learning in Yeshiva is it
    A. to gain the skills necessary for life long learning
    B. to gain Torah knowledge

    If its 100% emphasis on A then indeed a bachur should never touch an Artscroll. If it is 100% B then he should use it more often than not. Perhaps the goals of a bachur should be a hybrid of both with a bit more emphasis on A at the beginning of his Yeshiva career and more emphasis on B toward the ( projected) end of his career.

    If no thought is given to reassess his gaols each year then any serious yeshiva student will be missing out. If a 9th grader can still say that “he is learning how to learn” with the same conviction as a 5th year kollel yungerman then we have a serious flaw in out system.

    in reply to: What are any issues with serving a role in Conservative Shule? #1762879

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I think a more significant point than the status of R’ Laughing is to realize that this is not only being read by a bunch of Yeshivalite shmoozing in a Yeshiva coffee room. It is being read by everyone in the world. Imagine you had a brother that you were close with your whole life and then he joins a Conservative synagogue. Make comments with the love and sensitivity that this very brother is reading everything you say hear. What would you like him to hear?

    Even insinuating that your brother is a kofer is not the smartest or kindest thing to do. It is also probably not true.

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1752612

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    As someone who tried to follow the simultaneous translations at more than one siyum Hshas and at the citifield event I can tell you that it is very difficult to follow and understand. The translator is struggling to keep up with the speech and translate at the same time. Perhaps if the translators were given a text of the speeches ahead of time it might work but that does not seem to be the case. I do not fault the translators as it is indeed a difficult task to translate with one ear, talk at the same time and to also give over the right inflection of the speaker.


    CTRebbe
    Participant

    You will not solve the shidduch crisis by telling girls to not bother getting married. It would be a good idea to impress upon girls in both high school and seminary that they can still lead productive and fulfilling lives until they get married. Everyone should be prepared for the possibility they will be one of those statistics that will get messed up by the system and think about how they will lead a fulfilling life and be servants of Hashem if they are not married. OVER-emphasizing marriage to girls is a way to lead to miserable erroneously thinking they do not have a life if they are not married.
    Also a good idea to teach the basics of emunah and bitachon and how it relates to shiduchim. For some reason everyone talks on and on about the importance of emunah and bitachon but then feels like they can’t make a move without the shiducch boogeyman coming at them with the idea of “how can you do that? Don’t you know its bad for shidduchim?”

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1746458

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Ubiquitin- Perhaps it is a pointless argument if we can not get real numbers and each of us is just giving our estimates. However you can look at the videos of the last siyum and see the crowd. Best shots of this are when they show everybody dancing. My guess is that there are less than 100 participants who do not speak English. I also guess that a minimum of 20-30,000 do not understand a Yiddish speech. You can best see the crowd during the dancing. Another two points to consider

    1. The number of Yiddish speakers in America drops significantly every year. 7.5 years later means a big drop.

    2. Keep in mind all of the people participating remotely from around the world listening to the same program in real time. The percentage of Yiddish speakers in these areas is even less.

    My point was to not be concerned (too much) about the miut sheaino matzui (can’t understand English) and do be considerate of the tens of thousands who can not understand Yiddish.

    _in response to lowertuition-I would rather spend the time trying to learn the real focus of the siyum- limud Hatorah

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1746311

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    BP27-“As I said two Yiddish speeches, out of 11” You actually forgot about the speech given by the Klausenberger Rebbe which was over 15 minutes. That would make 3.5 speeches out of 12 in Yiddish. That is close to 30% which is a significant number. Especially if you consider the number of people who need to sit like golems during those speeches. Even if the total amount of Yiddish speeches is not more than 45-50 minutes if you multiply that by 50,000 we are talking about ten of thousands of hours shot. Think about how the halachos that relate to tircha ditzibura are much much shorter than that. If chazal take tircha detzibura so seriously shouldn’t we?

    Let’s stay focused. This is not a question of “Yiddish: good for the Jews or bad for the Jews?”. The question is this the place to push the Yiddish issue?

    Everyone has a tendency to look at their own personal surroundings and assume that the rest of the Jewish world is like that too. Ex: Joseph thinks the majority of Jews in America are Yiddish speaking chasidim. The obvious reality is very different. Orthodox Jews make up maybe 10-15% of Jews in America with Chasidim only a portion of that. Even amongst the attendees of the siyum hashas (granted it is mostly Orthodox) I think the chasisidim are under-represented compared to their total percentage of the Orthodox population. To imagine more than 50% of the attendees are fluent Yiddish speakers is ignoring reality.

    However many the actual numbers are, when someone gets up and speaks in Yiddish he is essentially saying to those who can’t understand “please pardon me while I ignore you for the next 15 minutes”

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1744253

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    BTW-CT Lawyer, I would like to invite you to a Yiddish event for our mosad in a few weeks. Can I tell where you can send the contribution? (wink wink)

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1744252

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    In response to Ubiqutin

    1. Joseph’s first point made no sense. I don’t know who considers it a Yiddish event. It is a Jewish event. Just bec. the two words share a commonality does not make them the same. (EX: Yabia Omer is Jewish but he is not Yiddish)

    2. I never said our common language is Hebrew. That misses the point. The common language of Jews in America is English. For better or worse it is a fact.

    3. I do not understand your comparison to bentching at a meal with people who do not understand. When you bentch you are not talking to them, you are talking to G-D. It is nice of you to explain what you are doing but I would not expect you to bentch in English. However, if you would want to say a dvar Torah at the table to teach and inspire the people at the table I would hope you would say it in a language they understand.

    4. Whatever they do with Latin at a Harvard graduation is most likely in line with the main objective of that event-its a formal ceremony. If it makes them feel like they are part of some elite segment of society, they can knock themselves out with it. I don’t think they will tell you that a Harvard graduation shares the same objective as a siyum hashas. What do we accomplish with ceremonial exclusion?

    I think a number of poster have missed the point. The question is not what is the national language of the Jewish people. The issue is that if we want to make the best use of everyone’s time at such a momentous event why not make a program from which everyone can gain? I do not believe that there are more than a handful of participants who have difficulty with English. Even American born chasidim who speak English with an accent are bi-lingual. I would estimate (I could wrong-it happen once) that when the speakers begin their presentations in Yiddish, at least half (probably more) zone out.

    It is true that most of the program is English, but a very significant amount of time is shot bec. people want to make a point that Yiddish is important. The place to make that point is in the YWN coffeeroom not while tens of thousands of your fellow Jews are waiting for you to get your ceremony out of your system

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1744058

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I don’t think anyone considers this a Yiddish event. It is an event for Jews but what does that have to do with the language? Would you invite someone to your house for a meal and then speak to everyone at the table in a foreign language?

    If I recall correctly, the Noviminsker started with Yiddish and then said that for the sake of those who speak English he will switch. I thought that was a very classy way to make his point that we “hold of” Yiddish as a chosen language but we need to accommodate those who are here. The bulk of his speech was English.

    The fact that the originators of the daf yomi spoke Yiddish is completely irrelevant. Based on that logic maybe the speeches should be in Aramaic?

    It would seem that English could accommodate everyone.

    in reply to: Unacceptable Grammar #1741249

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I think Milhouse proved my point. When people make grammatical errors when using Hebrew terms people just write it off by saying “oh that’s just Yiddish”. That is essentially saying that Yiddish the language is spoken by low-class ignoramuses who could care less what they sound like. That is an exact parallel to ebonics. For those of you who are not familiar with Ebonics here are some examples with the translation. Believe it or not there are academics who study this stuff…

    “I ast Ruf could she bring it ovah to Tom crib.” ( I asked Ruth if/whether she could bring it over to Tom’s place.)

    “Befo’ you know it, he be done aced de tesses.” ( Before you know it, he will have already aced the tests.)

    Don’t be trippin’ – Do not be anxious

    I ain’t gonna be no chump, you know what I sayin? (I will not be easily deceived, understood?)

    in reply to: Unacceptable Grammar #1739830

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I am surprised that no one made any mention of the common mistake of putting adjective/description before the noun as is done in English. For example
    Chosheve mosad or chosheve bachur (vs. mosad chashuv)

    Chanuka mesiba (vs. Mesibas chanuka)

    Purim seuda (vs. seduas purim)

    You may also realize that that there is no term in the sefarim of shalach manos (mishloach manos)

    BTW the same people who defend the Yeshivishe way of talking should also defend Ebonics (spoken by African American lower class) as a vald dialect that should be respected. They really are quite parallel.

    in reply to: When did Chabad become a Kiruv oriented Chassidus? #1729535

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    I do not understand all those who are saying that kiruv in chassidus goes back to the BeSHT or at least the beginning of Chabad chasiddus. There is a big difference between saying “kiruv is a good thing” which just about all Jews agree (BTW- even the non-Orthodox say this) and actively working towards it as a movement.

    Correct me if someone has information to contrary but in Chabad the movement toward kiruv did not start until the last Rebbe. It is true that many individuals were moser nefesh to fight the communists under the direction of the previous Rebbe and did start schools but that can not be called a kiruv movement.

    Kiruv as a movement in the Litvishe world was active before WW2 with Novardok and after the war in the later 1960’s with Yeshivos like Aish hatorah and Ohr Somayach

    in reply to: Is there a hetter for staying up both nights of Shavuos? #1725915

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    The main source for the minhag (I believe) is from the story brought in the Shaloh of the Bais Yosef and his chevrah when they were in Turkey (Chutz laaretz) and they stayed up both nights. The custom was not as widespread until fairly recently and it is odd that most people do not stay up both nights.

    in reply to: Chabad? Most non religious Jews are not halachikly Jewish. #1700804

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    The question really should be “what is the alternative”? Your choices are

    1. Don’t make any programs for non-frum Jews so we do not run the risk of engaging goyim in kiruv
    2. Do extensive background checks to ensure everyone in your program is halachicly Jewish.
    3. Have a “liberal” open policy and try to bring in as many Jews as possible. If at some point you realize someone is not halachicly Jewish then you work from there.

    Answer # 1 is the same as giving up on your Jewish brethren
    Answer # 2 is very impractical and will do more harm than good
    Answer # 3 seems like the only way.

    Let’s say there was a cattle car of Jews going to Auschwitz every day and you could save the entire group (with some risk) although not everyone is a halachic Jew, would you do it?

    in reply to: Building America after the war #1698775

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    Laewhut-Its not nice to troll

    in reply to: Building America after the war #1698773

    CTRebbe
    Participant

    If you are talking about builders of American Judaism post WW2 you can not leave out R. Shraga Feivel Mendelovitz Z”L

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