dullradiance

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  • in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1804481
    dullradiance
    Participant

    You may be interested in reading an article by Rabbi Bender in the Jewish Observer from over 30 years ago. “Mamme Loshon Is Precious, But Is It Talking To Us?” agudathisrael.org/the-jewish-observer-vol-21-no-5-summer-1988tammuz-av-5748

    Rabbi (Josh) Silvermintz wrote a response pointing out the ties between the post war generation and Europe and the role of Yiddish. Alas I cannot find the reference.

    in reply to: Can following a Chumra become a Chilul Hashem #1548559
    dullradiance
    Participant

    I have a question regarding the comment “It doesn’t matter if they keep Shabbos if they’re not Jewish…”.

    Isn’t a non-Jewish person who “keeps Shabbos” violating one of the 7 mitzvos Benei Noach? Isn’t such a violation a capital offense?

    in reply to: Should frum children have a library card? ✡️👪📚💳 #1149563
    dullradiance
    Participant

    The more proper question should be should children be allowed to read any material that is not absolute Torah.

    If you hold that “whosoever teaches his daughter talmud teaches her tiflus” then surely allowing even boy children books that are Bobbsey Twins type books should be banned.

    ***scroll biographies which are not really biographies are may be borderline reading material.

    Cookbooks are probably ok. Even boys may be able to read them to understand the complexity of the kitchen in order to give them a background to problems related to Taruvos.

    In conclusion, Jewish Libraries should restrict their lending material to various version of Sefer Tehillim.

    in reply to: Helicopters circling my head #1142708
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Hillary Clinton is running to be the President of the United States. She became a US Senator (from New York) with the help of a voting block of a certain chassidish sect from outside NYC. The block voted for her because she was the best candidate (hah) and/or it was a quid pro quo to gain a pardon for certain chassidim that were sitting for similar activities. (No relationship was ever shown between Ms. Clinton’s qualifications as a senator or to the pardon given by President Clinton.)

    Hashem Yishmor.

    in reply to: OU kashrus is not reliable? #1214446
    dullradiance
    Participant

    I have children who are allergic. I read the ingredients very carefully.

    Personally, I avoid non-kosher at the same level. When I see a hechser, it is a starting point then I look at the ingredients.

    Consider Kedem grape juice. A nice chassidish hechsher – but product contains potassium metabisulfite so children get one cup at each shabbos meal – no more. (There are brands of grape juice that do not have any sulfites.)

    in reply to: yeshiva Madreigas Ha'adam #1139957
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Rabbi Faskowitz is a wonderful Rosh Yeshiva. Very attune to the boys’ needs.

    The yeshiva has three sedorim and you MUST attend at least one. It is great for certain boys.

    in reply to: Letter from Rabbonim that Schools Must Accept Non-Vaccinated Children #1099223
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Are you in favor of giving the HPV vaccine? You can’t get HPV if a couple (have always been in and) are in a monogamous relationship. The recommendation is that all children should get the vaccine at age 11/12. The reason is that at that age, the probably don’t have it and after that age, (in the USA) probably will be at risk and probably won’t be under a doctors supervision.

    What are you going to say when there is an AIDS vaccine?

    P.S. You can’t attend Beth Medrash Gevoha if you can’t prove that you were vaccinated. I’d be interested in seeing a letter from the rabbonim quoted at the beginning of this post.

    in reply to: Thanksgiving: Church Holiday #1146345
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Not to be too picky, but there was a Proclamation for a Day of Thanksgiving issued by John Hanson, while serving as President of the Continental Congress, on October 11, 1782. The Day of Thanksgiving took place on November 28, 1782.

    Geo. Washington was the first president elected after the constitution was ratified. The USA had a different form of government from July 4, 1776 until December 1787.

    Feel free to search “president hanson thanksgiving”

    in reply to: Noisey floating wicks – advice needed #1044824
    dullradiance
    Participant

    The cause for the sputtering is that both oil and water are drawn into the wick at the same time.

    in reply to: who knows what "HIPPA" stands for ? (no googling it before) #1033437
    dullradiance
    Participant

    If you are talking about the 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, then you would be talking about HIPAA.

    Just saying.

    in reply to: Names and posukim. #1001474
    dullradiance
    Participant

    There is no posuk in the entire tenach that starts starts with ? and ends with a ?.

    If you are looking for a posuk for the end of the Amidah, look for a posuk with roshei teyvos of all the letters in the name.

    Idle curiosity, What is the source or meaning of the name?

    in reply to: Lost Dor Yesharim ID Number #1141029
    dullradiance
    Participant

    If you have the cancelled check used to pay for the original test, let the DY people know. That may also be a way of identifying yourself.

    in reply to: Will I get a shidduch? #977996
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Anything is possible. There was a girl named Tzipporah. She married a nice man who happened to be a fugitive with a murder rap hanging over him.

    They lived out of town for a while. He refined himself and eventually became known as Moshe Rabbenu.

    PS Exclude YU right wingers at your peril. Finding a really good young man is one in a thousand as we just read in Koheles 7:28.

    I know some that are 24X7 black hatters who are comfortable learning in any yeshiva and talking torah with litvish, chassidish talmidei chachomim, and the not yet frum.

    in reply to: Should kids have locks on their bedroom doors? #1002543
    dullradiance
    Participant

    What a great way to open a line of communication between parent and child.

    My dear child, why do you want a lock on your door? Dear parent – now listen, hear, and try to understand your child’s answer.

    Consideration – parents must have keys to all locks on all doors. Discussion will set up conditions where parents can open the lock without the child’s knowledge or permission.

    in reply to: Balak and Yair Lapid who's better? #960911
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Before you all respond to this keep in mind the warning – don’t judge a person until you are in his situation.

    How about this – who is better <insert your favorite gadol> or Yair Lapid?

    Take into consideration the upbringing of both and what each accomplished.

    How about this – who is better <insert your favorite gadol> or <insert another talmud chacham who doesn’t agree with you favorite gadol>?

    in reply to: Do any charedim wear straw fedoras? #950365
    dullradiance
    Participant

    I heard this comment about American culture from a “greener” shortly after he arrived in the USA when participating in his first Bar-B-Q. He was served corn on the cob by a man wearing a straw hat. Basically, he said – where I come from, the horses wear straw hats and eat corn not the people.

    in reply to: Black knitted kippa? #951038
    dullradiance
    Participant

    I don’t think knitted kippot exist. Knitting usually uses heavy yarn and two needles.

    There are crochet kippot. Made with a fine yarn (DMC) and one needle.

    You may view it as hair splitting but so is an techum around a square town vs a round town.

    in reply to: Matza Bakery Shailah #937735
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Take the worker to a din torah. If according to you, he ruined all the matzah in storage, that is what they should sue him for.

    in reply to: SHIDDUCH CONCERN #923226
    dullradiance
    Participant

    There are two (unrelated) issues here:

    Firstly, perhaps the young man is torn between yeshivish with black socks and chassidish with white socks. As a compromise he wears gray. On the one hand he is not sure of his derech on the other hand, he should be commended in making shalom between two opposite streams of chareidi-ism.

    Secondly, you need to find out if you are color blind. Perhaps the boy is wearing green or red socks. When you are color blind, the colors look gray.

    On a different note, you should speak to the young man to determine if he wears grey or gray socks.

    dullradiance
    Participant

    The following is based on a discussion with my Rov when the price of wheat rose almost doubled in 2006 between April and October.

    “famine” is defined as when the cost of wheat rises more than 50%. In the gemara’s times, the price of wheat was fixed so such a price rise is an indication of significant shortage. In our time and our place (both USA and E”Y) the price of wheat is not fixed and of course the value of our currency is not fixed so the concept of such a rise doesn’t exist.

    Furthermore, I am pretty sure he said the restriction does not apply to “onaah” rights as outlined in the kesubah.

    Finally, in our time B”H there is no shortage. It isnt like there isn’t wheat. Wheat can be purchased. The prices of wheat are manipulated. For example, Russia signs a treaty with the USA and our wheat is cheaper that Argentinian wheat so Russia buys from the USA and the USA prices go up. There is no shortage – the USA consumer just pays more and the USA companies sell the USA Argentian wheat.

    in reply to: Its time to address this important question: #891259
    dullradiance
    Participant

    In the orthodox world, there are ultra orthodox, chasidish, yeshivish and modern orthodox.

    If the newspapers catch you doing something wrong you are invariably ultra orthodox.

    If you are not chasidish and you are not yeshivish then you there is a good chance you are modern orthodox.

    LWMO and RWMO are as much a simplication as chasidish and yeshivish. Where would ???”? fit in?

    in reply to: siyum hashas certificate from Agudah #889225
    dullradiance
    Participant

    didthedaf dot com is selling bumper stickers LOL

    in reply to: siyum hashas certificate from Agudah #889211
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Certificate? A certificate is in the house where only your friends and mechutanim would see it.

    What we need is a bumper sticker “The driver of this car finished shas”.

    Let your neighbors and friends know! Who needs a lexus – I have THE bumper sticker.

    On a rightous note, let others think – if this fellow can do it, maybe I should try.

    in reply to: Dating more than one? #885791
    dullradiance
    Participant

    With regard to halacha…

    There are a number of discussion in the Gemarah about two (or more) men who want to marry the same woman. The discussion are under “shemah yekadmenhu acher”. Clearly a woman may consider two or more men.

    Of course men can marry more that one woman, so obviously a man can consider two or more women.

    in reply to: Better to Wear a Hat for Davening at Home than to Daven with a Minyan #886068
    dullradiance
    Participant

    When I was a teenager, I wore a brown hat to daven. Is such a thing allowed b’zman hazeh?

    When I was older, in the summer, I wore a straw hat to daven. Is such a thing allowed b’zman hazeh?

    in reply to: But what if you have water with you? #882240
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Clearly the solution is dehydrated water! Google it. See for yourself!

    A group of non-chassidish men were talking about skiing. A chassidish rebbeh asked what the conversation was about. When we explained, he told us the yiddish word for the sport. We invited him to join us – he thought about it for a couple of seconds and answered that he would not intentionally put himself into a “sakanah” but he thanked us “sai v’sai”.

    in reply to: Nusach sefard #1190173
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Perhaps the author of the Megillas Esther davened Sfard. It says that Achashvairosh was king from Hodu ad Kush. It would have been just as easy to write king from Kush ad Hodu. It is a remez that first you daven hodu and then mir get der tzizzis a kush!

    in reply to: Sesquipedalianism #1071159
    dullradiance
    Participant

    No.

    Short enough?

    in reply to: Schissel challah? #1071871
    dullradiance
    Participant

    A poster here posits that we are following a religious practice from a religion that started over 1,000 years after the Jewish people entered E”Y. It is as easy to say that the foreigners may have co-opted one of our minhagim for their own.

    A few other examples of minhagim that were adopted by other religions are:

    We no longer throw seeds at a chuppah because another religion took the practice as their own.

    We no longer use ksav Ivris because it was taken by another sect.

    The vort, tenayim and aufruf is done by the above mentioned relatively new religion and is called banns.

    in reply to: Schissel challah? #1071870
    dullradiance
    Participant

    I point you to Sefer Tamei Hamihagim siman 596 and 597.

    The key is a response to various pesukim regarding treasure rooms and parnassah.

    This particular Shabbos is chosen because it is the first shabbos that we can eat all grains (when it all turns to yoshon); It is also the first Shabbos that the Jewish people totally relied on grown grain upon entering E”Y as the Mon (manna) that was saved from the desert ran out.

    in reply to: tuition and home buying #869164
    dullradiance
    Participant

    This past year, one yeshiva restructured their tuition for full payers. They “reduced” the tuition by 15% (or so) and “requested” a donation of that amount.

    Basically, their accountants said that since full payers have been subsidizing tuition to that extent, let the payers get a deduction for it.

    in reply to: tuition and home buying #869163
    dullradiance
    Participant

    FedFed

    How would you determine the default rate for you TBS (tuition backed security)?

    in reply to: tuition and home buying #869162
    dullradiance
    Participant

    How about setting up a kehilla.

    in reply to: Sheva Brochos Divrei Torah #867943
    dullradiance
    Participant

    There is a sefer

    ??? ????? ???? ?? ????? ?????? ?”? ???”? ???? ???? ??? ??”?

    that ties in each parsha with a dvar torah associated with marriage.

    Inside the sefer is says, it is available from the ?’ ???? ???? in Jerusalem 820381 (as of 2006).

    in reply to: Kibud Av vs. cranky father in law #865480
    dullradiance
    Participant

    In Kedushin 31b, there is a story about Rav Assi and his mother. When his mother got old, she asked Rav Assi to find her a “husband that looks handsome like you”.

    Rav Assi left her in Bavel and went to E”Y. When Rav Assi heard that his mother was also coming to E”Y, he asked if he could leave E”Y and go to Bavel.

    dullradiance
    Participant

    Thank you artchill.

    If Pollard wasn’t advised of Rule 11 C 1 A&C then he “received constitutionally defective advice from counsel during plea bargain negotiations”.

    Of course the court ruled that if a defendant rejects a plea deal because of defective advice then a defendant is entitled to relief.

    In this case it is possible that Pollard accepted a plea deal based on defective advice.

    dullradiance
    Participant

    What is the context of this arithmatic question?

    If I use these symbols on my calculator, the answer displays a zero.

    If I use these symbols in a fortran program, the answer displays a 14.

    If I warn an eight year old that this is a trick question – s/he will answer 14.

    If I ask a grandparent the answer will probably be – Huh?

    If the answer is needed for a d’var torah, the answer could be 13, 14, 15, 5 or zero.

    dullradiance
    Participant

    (1) Not all prisoners. Over 90 percent. In the actual court decision Kennedy wrote “the simple reality that 97 percent of federal convictions and 94 percent of state convictions are the result of guilty pleas”.

    (2) He may have been advised, but his was advised poorly, i.e. did he know the government can break a deal. Was he advised that people outside the deal could effect the sentencing?

    in reply to: Yeshiva's reading rules #858471
    dullradiance
    Participant

    I know of one yeshiva that censored a fourth grade mishna class. Although the mishna says one word, the Rebbi insisted on saying “Bayah sh’noldah byom tov” instead of the word written.

    In Europe, where my father went to cheder, they translated “Isha Ke Sazria” as “ven a fro flaanced”. In yeshiva ketana they translated “Shtaar” as “a sherbel” (pottery fragment) – because “a kesubah iz a shtaar un a kesubah mer ken trachten fun frau’en”.

    in reply to: What are "charedim" busy with? #857764
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Ummm.

    Does that mean that there are no Yeshivish in Hatzolah?

    Does that mean that Yeshivish are not allowed into Bikur Cholim?

    Does that mean MO stop being MO when they get into Hatzolah?

    Only three questions – four questions will be asked in six weeks.

    in reply to: Whose Minhagim to follow!?! #851524
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Rav Simcha Kook (of Rechovos/Rechovot) tells that his son asked permission to do hataras neder so that he could eat gebroks at his father’s-in-law house. Rav Kook told him he doesn’t need reshus and he doesn’t need hatars nederim. His father said that his minhag is and was to eat gebroks.

    His wife’s minhag is to refrain from gebroks. He explained that his wife runs the kitchen and cooks like she was taught. Of course the Rav continued, I eat what the wife prepares.

    in reply to: Satmar Rebbe's contemporary speech #851352
    dullradiance
    Participant

    I suspect the spoke in yiddish. It is a common enough construct. “Ver s’farshtayt farshtayt – ver nisht iz nischt”.

    An example in Hebrew the construct consider “hamyvin yavin”.

    in reply to: english names for misheberach for cholim:is it permitted? #850935
    dullradiance
    Participant

    English started to form from German as a language about 1,500 years ago.

    Yiddish started to form from German as a distinct dialect about 800 years ago.

    Today, there are probably more Torahdikeh seforim, books and publications in English, then there ever was in Yiddish.

    Of course English is very limited and some ideas can only be expressed in Yiddish.

    in reply to: PESACH HOTELS #851095
    dullradiance
    Participant

    mr coffee room –

    In addition to their home, my mother’s grandparents had a small plot of land in Europe. They would supervise peasants in the plowing and planting. They would go in bekishe und streimel and harvest the wheat themselves. The women would use hand wheat grinders to make flower. The flower was kept in bags hung from the rafters in a storage room. She remembered this but didn’t remember the actual baking. She didn’t know what they did about yoshon.

    in reply to: PESACH HOTELS #851094
    dullradiance
    Participant

    To coffee addict –

    C”V perhaps it follows along with “on every night of the year we eat chametz u’matzah”.

    in reply to: PESACH HOTELS #851077
    dullradiance
    Participant

    From someone at Shul:

    Before Pesach we say “Chag Kasher v’Samayach” – why the double greeting?

    It covers all types –

    the stay at home folks – we “know” they are going to have a kosher Pesach but with all the work, we wish them a Happy Yom Tov.

    the hotel crowd – their preparation is easy so we know they will be happy – but we have to wish them a Kosher Yom Tov.

    in reply to: courage or cowardice? #848960
    dullradiance
    Participant

    > The halacha, as stated in Shulchan Aruch, says you save men first.

    All things being equal that is the halacha.

    Since they were so close to shore, the ability for a man to survive in the water a little longer than a child and/or a woman, and that the chance of dying is less than 1 in 100, it would be highly debatable whether the whole concept of “saved” comes in to play. Therefore, there would be a strong argument that in this case, it would OK L’Halacha to aid children and women first.

    in reply to: favorite gift you loved :) (please help) #846674
    dullradiance
    Participant

    Mmmm. Someone puts a girls name with a nice posuk into a pretty frame. They also have matching earing or note holders. Myjewishname dot net.

    in reply to: Refusing someone who's collecting tzedakah #845203
    dullradiance
    Participant

    I don’t mean to hijack this thread, but how do you deal with this. I am davening shachris when four or more (chasidish) looking men come in and spread out collecting. (Shortly later, another group of four or more come in collecting.) They come every day. They are not collecting for themselves. They won’t say if their collections go into the same pushka at the end of the day.

    We are taught not to speak in shul with a mashal of standing before a melach basar v’dam. Imagine turning to the person next to me to talk about a football game or the stock market. Here I am standing in shul and these collectors (who should know better) disturb and ask for a coin. Every day.

    Rant over.

    in reply to: Refusing someone who's collecting tzedakah #845202
    dullradiance
    Participant

    If you dont want to/cant give – say a nice word or a bracha: “Money is not what I can give you – however …” and end with “you should be matzliach”, “Hashem should help you”, “Refus”h”, etc.

    Try to look empathic when you say it. Oh and mean the bracha.

    A sincere bracha from a layman is never trivial. (From Al tehey birchas hedyot kal b’eynecha.)

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 51 total)