LeiderLeider…

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  • in reply to: midwinter vacation #1200013

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Try Poconos. Decent resorts at tolerable prices. Also Jewish-owned hotel right near Bushkill Falls.

    in reply to: Tehillim Minyan #1200663

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Thanks Joseph. I’ll check.

    in reply to: Matza and Mei Peiros #1144933

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Need to clarify my question. I was not intending to ask questions on halacha. I’m going with my Rav’s psak that I can proceed to eat Matza with non-water liquids. The purpose of my question was whether anyone has knowledge on which foods might be available to eat with matza (See mik5 response re avocado) and whether to your knowledge certain foods contain water (Mik5 comments as well re butter and cheese). Thank you.

    in reply to: Funny Analogies #1015161

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Really funny! Thank you!

    in reply to: Challah using no eggs at all #961362

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    From Cookkosher:

    DIRECTIONS

    1. Put an oven proof bowl/pan of water on lower rack of oven. Preheat oven to warm and then TURN OFF.

    4. Add the proofed yeast and the rest of the water (2 cups). With your hands or a mixer if preferred, mix all ingredients until forms a warm, sticky but smooth dough, about 5 minutes.

    5. Add more flour if necessary (probably another cup or two but ideally the dough should be somewhat sticky.

    6. Put dough onto floured surface and knead for a couple more minutes. (I don’t have a good surface to work on so I tend to keep the dough in the bowl to knead.)

    7. Place dough into a large oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel. Place into warm oven. (I like to put it on top of a cookie sheet in case it rises over the bowl.)

    9. Then punch down the dough and perform the mitzvah of separating challah with a blessing.

    10. Working on a floured surface shape dough into challah, should make about 5-6 good sized challot.

    11. Place onto greased cookie sheets and let rise another 30 minutes. Remove pan of water from oven.

    12. Preheat oven to 350.

    13. Lightly brush top with maple syrup mixed with water and bake about 25 minutes until golden. ENJOY!

    in reply to: Challah using no eggs at all #961361

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    From Creative Jewish Mom:

    Always Perfect No-Egg Challah: basic white flour challah dough

    Directions:

    1. If you live in Israel, sift your flour to make sure it is bug free. You can always pre-sift the flour and store it in the freezer until you need it.

    2. In a medium sized bowl, combine the yeast, a tablespoon or two of sugar and about half a cup of warm water (part of the total amount of water) mix, and set aside. This insures that the yeast is actually working and that it doesn’t come in contact with salt which can limit its ability.

    3. I use a mixer which can handle 2 kilos of flour, so I add the liquids first and then the solids. If you’ll be mixing and kneading the dough by hand you add the liquids to the solids in a large bowl, and once you have something that looks like dough, you knead it on your clean counter top.

    5. Once I have dough that is a nice consistency, neither too dry or too sticky, I take the whole amount and place it in a large garbage bag, usually the same one into which I’ve sifted my flour. Some people like to place a little oil on the outside of their ball of dough, but I don’t. I just seal the garbage bag tightly and place it in a warm place on my counter.

    6. The dough will take at least an hour to rise, and very often you’ll find that the garbage bag blows up into a large balloon! If you don’t get a balloon just poke the bag to make sure that the dough is very soft.

    7. Remove the dough from the bag, punch it down, and if you’d like to make the special blessing for baking challah, remove a large egg-sized portion and make the blessing. (You can find that info on google in many places.)

    8. Using a rolling pin, roll the entire portion of dough out into a large pizza like shape, making sure to pop any bubbles you may see in the dough. Then depending on how you’ll form your loaves, and how many loaves or rolls you’ll be baking cut this pizza shape into strips.

    9. Form the strips into balls, and leave on the counter to rest for about 10 minutes.

    10. Roll those balls out into long snakes for braiding and braid. Most braided loaves look the nicest if you tuck the ends under. For the nicest braided loaves try to make snakes that are fatter in the middle. (tutorial for this in the future!)

    11. Pre-heat your oven, in my case to 180C. Many people like to bake challahs on a higher temp. like say 200 C for ten minutes and then they turn the oven down for the remaining baking time.

    12. Set loaves on your baking paper lined oven racks, or in loaf pans, and set aside until loaves have risen and look like the photo above. (Note, I am very fortunate to have a 90 cm oven, so I can bake all my challahs at one time on one rack.) This may take up to an hour or more, but you don’t want to leave them too long or your braids will break apart.

    13. Just before placing in the oven brush on egg white (truthfully I use the whole egg, but most don’t.) and sprinkle on the topping of your choice, in our case poppy seeds.

    14. Bake until nicely browned, and bottoms are hard. I use a convection setting on my oven and baking time is only about 30 minutes, but on a regular setting baking may take up to an hour for large loaves. Rolls of course take much less time, so be sure to watch them!

    in reply to: Challah using no eggs at all #961360

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    From VegKitchen:

    1 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees F.)

    1/3 cup natural granulated sugar (such as Florida Crystals)

    1 teaspoon salt

    2 tablespoons canola oil

    3 tablespoons canola oil

    3 tablespoons warm water

    2 teaspoons baking powder

    Pour yeast into warm water along with a pinch of sugar in a large bowl and mix until combined.

    Let the mixture rest for 5 minutes or so until bubbly and creamy (I usually measure out the flour while waiting for the yeast). Add the sugar, salt, and additional 2 tablespoons of canola oil and mix.

    Beat the egg replacement ingredients with a whisk (it will fizz) and pour into the yeast mixture.

    Add the flour, a cup at a time, until it is difficult to stir the mixture. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead it until it is smooth and elastic (approximately 7 to 10 minutes). It should be springy.

    Transfer dough to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with a slightly damp cloth or plastic wrap and set in a warm place for 90 minutes. It should double in size.

    Transfer to a lightly floured surface and cut dough into two equal halves. Divide each piece into three pieces and roll out into 10 to 12 inch ropes. Pinch the ends together and proceed to braid the dough.

    Place on parchment lined baking sheet and let rise for additional 30 minutes.

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

    Bake for approximately 25 to 30 minutes depending on your oven.

    Notes for Great Challah:

    Add the egg replacer right before adding the flour. The reaction between the ingredients is what will give your challah lift (in lieu of eggs). If you put it in first, you will not have as much of a reaction when you add the flour.

    Make sure you preheat your oven.

    Baking powder needs to be relatively fresh. Old baking powder will yield a hard, flat challah.

    You can shape these challahs into rounds or rolls

    You can also add raisins, chocolate chips. Use your creativity. My kids love it when I brush a little oil to the top of the challah and then sprinkle with a dusting of Florida Crystal sugar before baking.

    in reply to: Help me wrap Spinka Tefillin #969375

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Strap around the Yud, causing a Shin, followed by another Shin, so you have six rounds around your upper arm. Then followed by six rounds around your arm, then diagonal across your hand, three rounds around your middle finger, then straight across your hand, so you have two Shins on your upper arm, and a shin on your finger.

    Unless you live in Alaska, you probably have a Spinka shul within shouting distance (slight exaggeration). Stop in and ask the Rav/Rebbe. He will undoubtedly be glad to show you.

    in reply to: Pi, eruvin 13b-14a #942420

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Correction to my previous post. The gemara is referring to water vs dry matter, instead of water vs heavier liquids. Can’t fathom why I mis-learned the gemara like that. In any event, my kashya is still valid, and I did find over Pesach that the Ritva asks the kashya and he is madchik a teretz that indeed the calculations of 2:3 of liquid:dry is applicable in this unique case where the first two Amos are round and the remaining 3 are square.

    Wondering if anyone had the opportunity to see a good teretz to this kashya. Thank you.

    in reply to: Pi, eruvin 13b-14a #942418

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Popa, with your permission, if I can add to this thread another question that has been bothering me on this subject.

    However, what’s bothering me is that as the Gemara concludes, the pool consisted of 3 amos of a square tub, followed by 2 amos of a round tub. If my calculations are correct, the ratio of height-to-width is larger in the case of a round tub than a square tub. So the premise Rashi sets forth on the height/width ratio, is this true for round tubs or for square tubs? And in this case we have a combination of the two.

    in reply to: Homemade Kosher L'Pesach Mayonnaise #938541

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Thank you Yenta!

    I also found the following (from The Kosher Channel website):

    The eggs must be certifiably fresh and/or pasteurized. Fresh eggs emulsify much better.

    Wash your eggs with soapy water as bacteria can be introduced through contaminated shells. Always crack eggs on a flat surface rather that a glass rim. This gives the shell the least contact with what’s inside.

    Use a super clean glass or metal bowl. Plastic has an oil residue that interferes with emulsification.

    Unflavored oil, such as safflower makes an all purpose mayonnaise. For dipping vegetables, or as a basis for dressings, I use either a mixture of safflower and extra virgin olive oil, or olive oil alone. For Passover you’ll want to make olive oil mayonnasie, so choose an extra light one or the oil taste will dominate. It tastes better if the egg flavor is also detectable.

    Your choice of lemon juice or vinegar will influence the flavor of your mayonnaise. You can use a bit of each or all of one or the other. The amount you use will also affect the flavor.

    The final tip for how to make mayonnaise is that all ingredients should be at room temperature. And it’s best if the humidity is low in the room; so no pots boiling away at the same time as you make homemade mayonnaise.

    Here’s your Recipe for Homemade Mayonnaise…plus a secret rescue tip!

    1 egg yolk from very fresh or pasteurized egg (plus another unbroken egg at room temperature)

    1/2 teaspoon salt

    1/2 teaspoon dry mustard, optional

    2 pinches sugar, optional

    dash hot pepper sauce, optional

    1-2 tablespoons lemon juice or vinegar

    1 cup extra light olive oil

    1. Place a very clean, dry glass or metal bowl on a moistened towel to keep in place. Use an electric beater to combine egg yolk, salt, and optional additions in the bowl.

    Add lemon juice and vinegar, beat to incorporate well.

    2. With beaters running on medium, add the first 1/4 cup of the oil DROP BY DROP. Then v-e-r-r-r-y s-l-o-w-w-w-l-y, drizzle in the remaining olive oil until an emulsion has formed and all oil is incorporated into the egg.

    NOW here’s the secret trick: Separation is very common at this stage, so don’t give up! Here’s how to make mayonnaise emulsify if your mixture doesn’t work:

    -Have another room temperature egg ready. Place the yolk in another scrupulously clean and dry bowl. Beat with electric beaters until sticky.

    -Add the first egg-oil mixture a spoonful at a time, beating each spoonful until fully incorporated. After the mixtures are combined and emulsified, add remaining oil in a thin stream.

    Adjust lemon and salt to taste. And you have about 2 cups of beautiful mayonnaise that will hold for up to 2 weeks tightly sealed in the refrigerator.

    in reply to: Homemade Kosher L'Pesach Mayonnaise #938539

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    *bump*

    Sorry for bumping. Please, if you have a recipe (or can direct me to one) please let me know. Thank you very much.

    in reply to: Chol Ha’Moed Trips #938366

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Thanks

    in reply to: Chol Ha’Moed Trips #938364

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Actually, Monsey area is good as well. Thanks.

    in reply to: Chol Ha’Moed Trips #938363

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Would appreciate if you can share any Chol Hamoed locations in central/north New Jersey, or White Plains area. Preferably indoors, as cold weather is expected. Much appreciated.

    in reply to: Adar Jokes #1134383

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Things are working out pretty well for awhile when one day Hymie, Morris’ old friend, finds Morris sleeping on a bench in the park.

    “Or Hymie, what should I tell you, it’s a Leap Year this year”!

    in reply to: 120 Years #917579

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Interesting to note that the lifespan of a healthy red blood cell is 120 days.

    in reply to: Murphy's Law #992049

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    What’s the difference between a Shlemiel and a Shlimazel?

    The Shlemiel spills his coffee on the Shlimazel’s lap…

    in reply to: Be gentle to your kids. They'll be your parents one day. #879541

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Treat your kids nicely because they will choose your nursing home.

    in reply to: Technology and the Third Beis Hamikdash #1015970

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Please note that that I was asking specifically about the Beis Hamikdash. For example, we do see that they made an improvement to the Kiyor so that it doesn’t get posul B’Linah, using an advanced contraption to lower the Kiyor overnight into a pool of water. So, I imagine that available technology will be utilized within the Beis Hamikdush, but was looking for views and sources on this subject. Thanks.

    in reply to: Rain #876514

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Cool rain facts:

    Rain drops can fall at speeds of about 22 miles an hour.

    Rain starts off as ice or snow crystals at cloud level.

    Light rain is classified as being no more than 0.10 inches of rain an hour.

    Heavy rain is classified as being more then 0.30 inches of rain an hour.

    Louisiana is the wettest state in the U.S, which received an annual rainfall of 56 inches.

    Rain drops range in size from 0.02 inches to about .031 inches.

    Rain drops do not fall in a tear drop shape; they originally fall in the shave of a flat oval.

    Mt. Waialeale in Kauai, Hawaii, has up to 350 rainy days every year.

    in reply to: the neighbor from – – – – #875246

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Put on irritating music right out your window as soon as they come out to smoke, and shut it when they leave. Keep on doing this until they stop.

    in reply to: Stomach Lap Band Surgery #869179

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    I’ve got several friends who banded, some of them for a couple of years now. BPT is right. They walk around like ghostly zombies. They are pale, withdrawn, and look absolutely miserable. However, it is a lifesaver when medically necessary.

    in reply to: Pouring Wine/Grape Juice Back Into The Container #860494

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Parable.

    Yankle hurts Moshe – for no reason at all.

    Moshe gets upset and says he’s not moichel Yankle.

    Yankle says, oh but you really should be moichel me (even though I’m not even acknowledging that I did something wrong). You ask Hashem 3x day for Mechilla. Also, if you’re moichel me, Hashem will be lenient with you.

    How heartwarming.

    in reply to: Pouring Wine/Grape Juice Back Into The Container #860492

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Daas. Thank you. Can you refer me to the particualr Siman? We’re trying to put together a comprehensive picture on this topic and would appreciate any and all details. Much obliged.

    Toi. When you have a chance I would appreciate if you can point out where I can find the rulings you mention. Thanks again.

    YakovL. What should I tell you, I’m at a loss… you were potentially oiver on an array of aveirus with your presumptious assertion against me, and yet you preach to me about the merits of Mechila. Astounding.

    in reply to: It is dj vu all over again #1100597

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    That sounds like a Yogi Berra quote. He was famous for his fractured improper quotes. You may enjoy the following quotes attributed to him:

    A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.

    Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they won’t come to yours.

    Half the lies they tell about me aren’t true.

    I never said most of the things I said.

    If you come to a fork in the road, take it.

    Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.

    The future ain’t what it used to be.

    We made too many wrong mistakes.

    You better cut the pizza in four pieces because I’m not hungry enough to eat six.

    in reply to: Pouring Wine/Grape Juice Back Into The Container #860489

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Toi. Thanks for your comments. I would be very obliged if you can point out the two rulings you mention. Would like to share it with my Ruv.

    YakovL. If you think I need to be Moichel you (“bemechilas kvodchem”) then let it be stated for the record that I am not moichel you. I started my post with “Food for thought” and I posed a very legitimate question and I wanted to hear what the Oilem has to say about it. A professional answer, such as the one from Toi, is what I was hoping to hear, not a judegmental rant about alleged Gaiva that you so keenly perceived in me.

    in reply to: Pouring Wine/Grape Juice Back Into The Container #860482

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Food for thought.

    The grape juice bottles are not Toiveled. The manufacturer is not mechuyev to Toivel them because they are merely using them as a means of transporting the grape juice to its consumers, and as such, is not mechuyev Tevila. And for this reason we are not required to Toivel candy dishes and other glassware that we give as gifts to others (think Mishloach Manos).

    It is a given that if you wish to reuse the grape juice bottle for other purposes, that you are now using it as an official Keili, and you are required to toivel it. However, as long as you keep on slowly emptying the original bottle, you are not required to Toivel it (otherwise we would be required to empty our grape juice bottles right away).

    So, for those that pour Kiddush grape juice BACK into the bottle in order to have them for Havdalla, aren’t you in fact “re-using” the bottle to hold this grape juice until Motzei Shabbos?

    Thoughts to keep in mind: A container that keeps food for storage is not required to be Toiveled, however, a container which is brought to the table does require to be Toiveled. (Think sugar dispenser, which needs to be Toiveled, vs. the large sugar container, from which you would pour into the dispenser, which does not require to be Toiveled).

    So, let’s hear it, guys!

    in reply to: !!!!!!RFDOS!!!!!!!RFDOS #1097701

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    RFDOS

    – Ripe Fruit Deoderizes Office Space

    – Random Flowers, Dandelions Or Spider-lillies

    – Roaches, Flies, Dogs, Ogres, and Spiders

    – Rarely Fresh, Disgustingly Old and Sour

    in reply to: melacha after licht #837606

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Certainly no knitting, sewing, laundry, etc.

    This year I heard a chissush from a dayan, that perhaps cooking would also not be allowed. The premise is that the woman needs to do a “recognizable” abstention from work. So if a woman would generally putter around in the kitchen and cook, then she should refrain from doing so during this half-hour.

    First time I heard this. Thought I would share…Would appreciate feedback if anyone has heard this concept before.

    in reply to: Question! #837161

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    My LOR paskened to a certain individual who was stuck in BP at a Chanukah party that he can eat and drink during the party anything he wishes except for Hamotzie and Mezonos, after which he can go home to light the menorah.

    in reply to: Orchestra or one man band? #829251

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Was at a wedding last week of a very close relative and the music was intolerably high and I JUST WALKED OUT and went home! I spent a total of 5 minutes at the wedding. His loss…and I get to keep my hearing.

    in reply to: The New Lakewood Seminary #827016

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    HLM. Thanks for bringing up. I’m also looking for info, including experiences. Would appreciate any info I can get. Thanks.

    Do you know what they charge?

    in reply to: "Do You Talk To Yourself?" #822346

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    bein.

    I’m sorry, were you speaking to us?

    in reply to: Great Chol Hamoed Trip Near Monsey,Vry Reasonable, 14 hrs left! #816497

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Do you have more info on this?

    Also, the farm website appears to quote the same fee of $5.00 without the need for the Groupon purchase. Am I reading it correctly?

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks.

    in reply to: Is it mutar to tie a string to the schach? #816118

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Thanks all

    in reply to: Is it mutar to tie a string to the schach? #816114

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Thanks YW for bringing up this subject.

    I’d like to hear more about this from the Oilem, please. I personally tie it very loosely, only in order to prevent it from going flying in a super-strong wind. Otherwise it indeed doesn’t serve the purpose of holding the schach down.

    Basically, it doesn’t hold the schach down in a “ruach metzuah”, but it does so in a “ruach she’aino metzuah”, and therefore is permissable.

    Now, these were kind of my own conclusions. Am I correct?

    in reply to: The Easiest & Best Sukkah Shlock (Roof Covering) #838051

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    OK, thank you ICOT.

    in reply to: The Easiest & Best Sukkah Shlock (Roof Covering) #838049

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    ICOT. Where in Brooklyn would I find such accordian schlok?

    in reply to: Bearing a Grudge #812019

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Denim. Aries is correct, and I concur with her approach, albeit in a more selfish manner. Basically, you should refuse to allow that person to live in your head! This person who has hurt you so much should have no right to wiggle herself into your brain and, in addition to hurting you to begin with; to continue on and on to hurt you non-stop! She ensconced herself inside your head driving you nuts, while she merrily goes about her way!

    So, yes, there’s the element of forgiveness, and I can’t pasken on whether there are ethical, moral, or halacha requirements to forgive her, but prior to (or in conjunction with) forgiveness, you should selfishly refuse to let her continue to hurt you.

    in reply to: New Suits!?!? #812063

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    I hear Syms in lower Manhattan has great deals on suits. Also, Jos A Bank always advertises ridiculous sales. Check it out. Of course, don’t forget to check out Century 21. There’s one right here on Brooklyn on 86th st.

    in reply to: I payed $21,000 for my daughters misery! #813251

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Hatzlacha!

    in reply to: Selichos….ooooh NOOO #896435

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    If it makes you feel any better, many of us are in the same boat. I have no doubt that if we truly understand the Slichus we will have an easier time saying it. May I suggest that you pick one or two pizmonim from each day of Slichos (perhaps more for erev Rosh Hashanah) and learn it through and through in-depth, including looking up referenced pesukim etc. until you own the piece! You will be looking forward to Slichos!

    Tried, tested, and proven…

    Same with daily davening.

    in reply to: need advice on refinancing mortgage #811872

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Changing to a 30 year mortgage will slow down the payment of principal considerably, due to the amortization of the payments (i.e. for the first couple of years you will be paying primarily interest and relatively little principal). However, changing it from a 20 to a 10 or 15 year mortgage (with potentially the same monthly payments due to the lower rate) will cause you to pay off the principal much faster, thus allowing you to take out another mortgage or line of credit when you think you’ll need it down the road.

    Don’t take this as advice. Just pushing in a thought there for you to think about…

    in reply to: Gematria 350? #812004

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Am: That is in fact R’ Yossi’s argument further in the mishna.

    in reply to: Gematria 350? #811998

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    A horn that is called “Keren” is actually Pasul for shofar. A cow’s horns, although it has the proper characteristics of a shofar, is Pasul to be used as a shofar because the Torah calls it a “Keren”.

    Meseches Rosh Hashana Perek Gimmel Mishna Beis. Shitas Taana Kama.

    in reply to: The geography game! #1203599

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Oman

    in reply to: roof solar panels #803869

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Thanks yungerman. Is it possible to find out whom he used for the installation and whether he recommends them? I am also potentially interested in this.

    in reply to: Prewedding Jitters #790577

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    Guys! A little sympathy here!!

    um: congratulations on your upcoming marriage. I wish you tons of hatzlochoh!

    It will be absolutely great! Stupendously fantastic!! You have a beautiful life to look forward to, where you will be sharing your life with a partner. You will have a partner to confide in, and share the trials and tribulations of life. Oh, how beautiful!

    Just enter into it with an open mind and an uncluttered spirit. Realize that from hereon you no longer have to bear the burden of life alone. And also realize and understand that no two people are alike and it will require a concerted effort to mold your life together into an exquisite form. It is a good exercise and should not be cause for pain and panic. Look forward to it and approach it head-on in a healthy and spirited manner.

    Go for it, um! You can do it!

    in reply to: Baby beats 48 million to one odds #790950

    LeiderLeider…
    Participant

    on the ball: thank you! your example illustrates the inherent flaws in following such statistics.

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