Redleg

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  • in reply to: Despicable Middos of our Hero #1786924

    Redleg
    Participant

    A couple of thoughts:
    1. The President of the United States is, in fact, the Rosh Memshala (Head of State) as well as the Head of Government. In a Parliamentary system such as in the UK or Israel, the Heads of State and Government are separated, I.E. a Queen or President and a Prime Minister. In the U.S. the President serves both functions. In addition, the President is also Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces as well as Chief Law Enforcement Officer
    2. Heroes don’t necessarily have to possess good midos to be heroic. Even in our own Tradition, Yiftach and Shimson weren’t particularly good role models but were certainly heroes.

    in reply to: Recession is all the Democrats fault! #1778580

    Redleg
    Participant

    What recession?

    in reply to: An amendment to protect hunters #1776150

    Redleg
    Participant

    The right to hunt is covered by the ninth amendment. The second amendment refers only to self defense and defense of the community. In 1938, SCOTUS in U.S. v Miller ruled that only weapons suitable for military formations are covered by the second amendment.

    in reply to: GGWG Militia #1774889

    Redleg
    Participant

    Milhouse, SCOTUS agrees with you. See Heller v District of Columbia
    Joseph, lot o’ luck with that one.

    in reply to: Eating Fish #1771146

    Redleg
    Participant

    Juvenile swordfish do have scales which they lose as they grow into adulthood.

    in reply to: Is it ‘un-manly’ to take kids to the park? #1770650

    Redleg
    Participant

    I think you need an attitude adjustment

    in reply to: restaurant on first date??? #1767628

    Redleg
    Participant

    Wow, CTL! What a blast from the past. Lou G. Siegal (I always found that their meat dishes were a trifle too salty), Moshe Peking, etc. I bet that you’re almost as old as I am.

    in reply to: learning from an artscroll #1767629

    Redleg
    Participant

    The main issue for yeshiva high school and first year BM is to learn how to make a leining. The problem is two fold. the first, is to understand how the gemora is organized and to be able to able to follow the shakla v’tarya. The second, and frankly the harder of the two, is learning the translation of technical terms. Back in the day, the primary tool for translation was Jastrow. Yeah, he was a shtikel apikores but the translations were extremely accurate. The system of learning inside and going to Jastrow when necessary, gave one the tools for life long learning. Along comes the Soncino Sha’as. While the translation was also quite accurate (frankly, more accurate than Artschroll). The daf by daf format was distracting and required less internalizing translation and p’shat.
    Enter Artschroll. With Artschroll the system is reversed. The English text and explanations become the ikkar and the original daf is just for reference. Now, that’s fine in that it opens up learning for those who may not have developed the skills alluded to above and adds to the general accumulated understanding of p’shat, but it eliminates any requirement to actually know how to learn.
    So the maskana seems to be that Artschroll has its place but it is not a substitute for learning inside.

    in reply to: Why is Yad Soledes Bo so Cold? #1767622

    Redleg
    Participant

    Different poskim have different values for yad soledes bo (YSB). I have seen values from as low as 110 degrees F to as high as 160 degrees. Current practice is to use both values l’chumrah. As a side note, I wonder how some poskim came up with their published values for YSB. Clearly, in the times of the Gemora, there was no way to objectively determine objective values for temperatures lower than boiling water. I have always understood that YSB was a temperature which was not simply uncomfortably hot but a temperature at which one’s hand would reflexively recoil. To my mind, the commonly accepted lower limit of 110 does not come close to meeting the the description.

    in reply to: Which famous people have you met? #1767623

    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, as a digression, you mentioned having had business dealings with “the Donald”. How did you find dealing with him as a person? A couple of my acquaintances who have done business with the Trump organization tell me that they found him to be rather a nice fellow.

    P.S. Doesn’t your shoulder get sore from patting yourself on the back so often?

    in reply to: Meteor Shower #1767624

    Redleg
    Participant

    Oseh Ma’ase Bereishis

    in reply to: Will Classical Music Come Back in Style? #1765949

    Redleg
    Participant

    Agree with RebYidd23

    in reply to: Do you ever wonder how a random Yidd is doing? #1765952

    Redleg
    Participant

    Frankly, i’m mildly annoyed when folks use the term “Yid” when writing in English. What’s wrong with calling a Jew a Jew? Is a “Yid” somehow different from a “Jew”? Also, when writing in English, I prefer using the term “gentile” to describe a non-Jewish person rather then using the transliterations of “Goy” or “Eino Yehudi”, not to mention derogatory names like “Shaygitz”. English is a very precise language with the largest vocabulary of any language, Use it. Oh, and don’t tell me that some Jewish concepts or Gemorrah terms have now English translation. That is rubbish. People who say that simply don’t know English well enough.


    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph is correct. (Ouch!! that hurt to say) Pennsylvania “Dutch” Is “Deutsche”. A dialect of German called Mittel Hoch Deutche which, incidentally, is the root language of Yiddish.

    in reply to: The Importance of Having Short Hair #1765611

    Redleg
    Participant

    “What’s in your head is more important than what’s on you head.” that goes for hair as well as hats and kipos.

    in reply to: Is Harry Potter kosher #1765610

    Redleg
    Participant

    Cholent is apparently put off by someone who actually speaks (and writes) English. Okay, for you we’ll confine ourselves to words of two or less syllables (That means “small words” for you, Cholent)

    in reply to: Will Classical Music Come Back in Style? #1765609

    Redleg
    Participant

    Classical music has never gone out of style although it is evolving. The funny thing is that people today sometimes don’t realize that what we call “classical music” was the pop music of it’s time. Ever hear of Lisztomania? It was the 18th Century version of Beatlemania. Franz Liszt and other composers and performers were the rock stars of their time. When I went to yeshiva, back in the Late Bronze Age,my RY said that all melodies were kosher except for those that were identifiable as liturgy (e.g. Silent Night).

    in reply to: Can a husband bring down his wife (take her farther from Hashem)? #1765608

    Redleg
    Participant

    I get the impression that the people who are having difficulty with the question have never been married. I cannot imagine a married man who doesn’t feel that his wife has made him a better person, both religiously and personally. Mrs. Redleg has certainly helped make me so. This is what Eizer Kenegdo means.

    in reply to: The wrong impression #1765607

    Redleg
    Participant

    Neville, the issue is about identifiable Jews acting poorly. Anonymous Jews don’t pose the same problem.
    Also, how could could any udentifiable Chasid make a real Jew feel inadequate?

    in reply to: The moon or mars #1765004

    Redleg
    Participant

    Re Kiddush Levana on Mars: Mars has two moons, Phobos and Deimos. Both are much smaller than Earth’s moon .but closer. Phobos ‘s orbital period is about 7.6 hours and Deimos, being further away, has a period of a little more that 30 hrs, (our moon has an orbital period of 29 days) Which one would be used to calculate the month? Mars’ own year is 637 days and a Mars day is just a few minutes longer than ours. so do the math. Mars year is about 15,300 hours divided by 30 hrs (using Deimos) = 510 months in a Martian year. That should keep you busy.

    in reply to: Is Harry Potter kosher #1764998

    Redleg
    Participant

    Rowling’s ex parte description of Dumbledore’s predilection brings up an interesting machlokes in the theory of Literary Criticism referred to in those circles as “the Death of the Author”. The question is whether the characters and story exist in the author’s mind, in which case it is perfectly understandable that the author can offer perush and explanation of his or her work or, say, describe what his or her characters do after the end of the published work, or do the characters and story only exist on the printed page. Any activity or character development outside of the text is unknown and unknowable because the author is (figuratively) dead. In the latter case, if it is not mentioned in the text it doesn’t exist.

    in reply to: Is Social Security a Ponzi scheme? #1764973

    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, OK call it an unitended Ponzi scheme. In the original 1934 (?) version, SS was, indeed, intended to pay out from funds derived from interest on investments in obligations. The problem arose when the obligations in which the SS fund was invested was mostly T Bills which meant that the government was using SS contributions as general funds, I.E. borrowing from itself. Once SS started having to pay benefits from later contributions, it became a pyramid scheme. Like all such multi layer schemes, as long as the base of the pyramid keep s growing, everything is cool. The problem that SS is facing is that the number of younger contributors is shrinking while the number of folks receiving benefits is growing. If the SS fund was a real fund as it was sold as, that would be a lesser problem. The fact is, though, that the benefits being paid come directly from the contribution of those working and paying. That’s the very definition of a pyramid scheme, intentional or not.

    in reply to: Is Social Security a Ponzi scheme? #1764638

    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, Your description is a distinction without a difference. The key isn’t taxpayers or investors, it is the characteristic of both schemes, Ponzi or SS, is that, rather than paying out benefits to the contributors/investors from the profits supposedly accruing to the fund’s activities, they use the payments from later participants to fund the benefits paid to the earlier participants.

    in reply to: Stories of Gedolim and the Moon Launch #1763399

    Redleg
    Participant

    “He made statements about the “rotation” of the Sun and the moon relative to the earth and the size of the moon relative to the sun and earth which were not accurate by today’ standards.”

    His statements were not accurate, period. As was noted, the RAMBAM was simply repeating the prevalent understanding in his time.
    Referring to “today’s standard” implies that, perhaps sometime in the future, it may be discovered that the universe really is geocentric which, of course, would be nonsense.

    in reply to: The moon or mars #1763398

    Redleg
    Participant

    The moon or mars

    Yes

    in reply to: What are any issues with serving a role in Conservative Shule? #1761932

    Redleg
    Participant

    Koffee, he (she?) didn’t ask you for a psak. He/she asked for a discussion of the issues involved. Are there any other concerns besides the mixed seating? Does the conservative movement deny Torah min HaShamaim? that would make all of the “mispalellim” (for Joseph, note the quotation marks) kofrim which would be a good reason to avoid any association. Any other issues you can think of?

     

    Edited for civility

    in reply to: Kosher shaver? Phillips One Blade #1760883

    Redleg
    Participant

    I don’t understand what is accomplished by dulling the cutting blade. If the issue with the shaver is tarr, than all you have is a dull tarr, Maye nafke mina? For that matter, what is the specific issur of tarr? Is it the blade against the skin? Is it the closeness of the shave? If the latter, why was samm (depilitory powder) ok? How about a razor cut haircut? The razor is just used to trim the hair, not shave the head. The blade never touches the scalp. In fact, the action of the razor against the comb is not unlike the action of an electric shaver. How about a trimmer (Note 2) with a guard. A #2 would give you that stubble look I mentioned above.
    It seems to me that all psak, especially psak that dealing with technology, needs a detailed explanation . Just saying “assur” is insufficient.
    Note 1: If the specific issur is removal of the beard, then all of the questions above about shaving are moot.
    Note 2: A trimmer works exactly like a scissors, blade against blade.


    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, you were doing fine until you compared Trump to Hitler YM'”S. Stick to stuff you know something about like law. Leave running the Country to wiser heads. P.S. I did not vote for Trump and I may not in 2020. That is if the Democrats can find a candidate with ah IQ higher than his/her shoe size.

    in reply to: YU Bochrim #1757695

    Redleg
    Participant

    Why would any self respecting YU bachur, or any yeshiva bachur for that matter, want to marry your daughter if it meant getting you for a mother-in-law. frankly, your concerns expressed above are trivial to the point of silliness. It is for cases such as this that Chazal tell us that a potential Chasan/Kallah need not follow their parents desires.

    in reply to: Admission Cards #1757689

    Redleg
    Participant

    Relying on “heavy hitters” to make up the shortfall runs into the main difficulty inherent in all redistribution schemes. To quote Margaret Thatcher, “Sooner or later you run out of Other People’s Money”.
    IMO, the main problem is that each school is a separate fiefdom to itself and is often run as a business that relies on tuition and donations to pay its expenses and provide livelihoods for their owners. There is no central Board of Ed that runs all the local schools a public enterprise. An example of this organization is, l’havdil, the Catholic school system where all the schools in the Diocese are run by Diocesan board and supported by general funds.
    What needs to happen is:
    1. Consolidation: Instead of 5 schools with 150 enrollment, why not one school with 600 enrollment? Yeah, I know that there may be differences in hashkofah but so what! Torah is the same for everyone and as are secular studies.
    2. Centralization: All schools the area should be under one administration. Which receives funds and distributes them. (N.B. This already works in homogeneous communities like KJ and New Square. The problem is to get folks to disregard a little of their personal hashkofos for the greater good.)
    3. Funding: While, as CTL so cogently points out, government money comes with a lot of baggage, there is no reason that schools should not accept Jewish money. That means that the schools need to just bite the bullet and join Federation.

    in reply to: Collecting with R’ Chaim on the internet? #1757675

    Redleg
    Participant

    Meno, exactly what are you disagreeing with?

    in reply to: ADHD is EXTREMELY underated #1757674

    Redleg
    Participant

    Of course ADHD is real. the problem is that it is vastly over diagnosed, very often by teachers and menahalim who have no medical training at all. They use ADHD as a crutch to deal with troublesome students, most of whom are simply bored and act out. It’s so much simpler to medicate a bright, active child into submission than to actually work with them.
    Your issue clearly illustrates the “boy who cried wolf” problem. It’s not that the constant false alarms are annoying, it’s that when the wolf does come, no one believes it.

    in reply to: Does Israel need a 3 State Solution #1757669

    Redleg
    Participant

    The Talmidei Ha’Gra are not a good example. They were quite few in number (less than 100), they attempted to be self-supporting by farming and other labor and they relied on funds from abroad to purchase land.
    The idea of an independent Chareidi state is risible. With a net minus economy, no means of defense and the impossibility of creating and sustaining a coherent government, such a state would collapse under its own weight in two years.

    in reply to: The Importance of Having Short Hair #1756249

    Redleg
    Participant

    Up until WW1, wrist watches were only worn by women. Men used pocket watches. Soldiers in the trenches found that wearing your watch on your wrist was much ,more convenient than fishing it out of your pocket while lying on your stomach. Watchmakers started making men’s wrist watches after the war. Also, the reason that many old-timers wear an “up” hat or homberg is that the common snap brim fedora was also exclusively worn by women.


    Redleg
    Participant

    Not really sure of the context. The only frum on-line business that I know of is B&H and their customer service is almost universally known as routinely excellent. I can’t imagine anyone downgrading their references to them. Is Bezos of Amazon Jewish?

    in reply to: Star-K Article about Electric Shavers #1754419

    Redleg
    Participant

    Firstly, it should be noted that the clean shaven European bachurim in the photos were using samm (depilatory powder), not electric shavers, which raises another issue:
    Are those poskim who asser the use of electric shavers doing so because they are under the impression that the shaver blade touches the skin of the face and is, in effect, a sort of mini-tarr, or is the issue that the shaver shaves so close that it LOOKS like the individual shaved with a tarr. If the former, than the clean shaven look of the bachurim in the photos was, you should pardon the expression, completely kosher. On the other hand, if the issue is the latter…
    Another thought: Stubble is sort of fashionable these days and men are using shavers and trimmers to achieve and maintain that “two day shadow” look. Would that be muttar according the poskim cited?
    Personally, the custom of my familythat the tsurah of a married Jew is bearded and I started growing one when I became engaged and have been bearded ever since (except for two brief periods when clean shaven-ness was required for safety reasons).

    in reply to: Star-K Article about Electric Shavers #1750290

    Redleg
    Participant

    For Ploni Doe, samm which I mentioned is the depilatory powder used for shaving that your grandfather used. It was widely used, mostly in Lite and in U.S. Yeshivas back in the fifties when I was in yeshiva. You mixed with water into a green paste and smeared in on your face, let it set for a few minutes and then scraped it and the hair off with a wooden or rubber spatula. It smelled awful but it worked.

    in reply to: Star-K Article about Electric Shavers #1750000

    Redleg
    Participant

    I don’t get it. Virtually all of the photos European bachurim from the 20’s and 30’s from the yeshivas of the Gedolim noted in previous posts show that most were clean shaven. Given that so many of the aforementioned Gedolim were on record as opposing shaving, even with samm, how does one account for the photographic evidence that shaving was customary and wide spread?

    in reply to: Sugya Learning #1745281

    Redleg
    Participant

    The brisket methodology I prefer is slow cooked BBQ style. On the other hand, Brisker methodology is not as you describe. The Brisker method seeks to find underlying principles that unify the various decisions of Chazal. In some respects it resembles Scientific Method which arose contemporaneously. The saying is that in pilpul yeshivos, bucharim can find seven terutzim for one kushia. In Brisk, they find one teretz for seven kushios

    in reply to: Lo Titgodedu? #1743523

    Redleg
    Participant

    Yes, in my view.

    in reply to: Sephardim minhag origin? #1743522

    Redleg
    Participant

    The “shrill scream to which you refer has a name. In English, it’s called ululation and it is common for festivities in Arab and other Middle Eastern cultures.

    in reply to: Do words of hate matter? It’s just words or is it sinister? #1722768

    Redleg
    Participant

    Joey, whether or not the First Amendment is a “Jewish Value”, it is the law of the land in which we find ourselves. Frankly, the First amendment is a good idea in general as the same law that permits hateful speech protects us, our speech and religious practice. Joey should be especially grateful for the First Amendment as it also protects foolish and pointless speech.

    in reply to: Happy Mimouna! #1722258

    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph should know

    in reply to: Kaliv vs other chassidus #1722251

    Redleg
    Participant

    Age doesn’t necessarily convey wisdom nor does youth imply lack of judgement. Shlomo haMelech was twenty (according to the RAMBAN) when he ascended to the the throne of Israel. I think he did a pretty good job, don’t you?

    in reply to: Scranton, PA #1722225

    Redleg
    Participant

    Yeah! be sure to check out the coal mine that’s been on fire since 1962 in nearby Centralia PA.

    in reply to: Do words of hate matter? It’s just words or is it sinister? #1722220

    Redleg
    Participant

    Bigotry, name-calling or any other expressions of hatred, even simple rudeness, are never okay and should be remonstrated against whenever they are encountered (use common sense). I do, however, have a problem with criminalizing thought. A person should be free to think whatever they want. They can hate Jews, Blacks, Muslims, left-handed people, etc as much as they want. So-called “hate speech”, as long as it’s a general statement and not specifically inciting (I.E. “Let’s string ’em up!”) is actually protected speech under the First Amendment, however loathsome it may be, but a specific insult or act of bigotry directed at an individual or group is an assault that needs to be countered by whatever means at their disposal.

    in reply to: Spiritual Level of Rare vs. Well Done Steak #1722214

    Redleg
    Participant

    CT, I agree that well-done is not a good thing to do to a steak in the Olam haGashmi. In fact, most restaurant kitchens use the ends and poorer cuts for “save for well-done”, I.E. for when a customer orders well-done.
    The OP, however, is speaking of the spiritual quality of foods in which case I maintain that no spritiual aliya accrues to to meat according to it’s well-doneness.

    in reply to: vacation for men #1722200

    Redleg
    Participant

    Dachtzach mir, this conversation, and others similar, are precisely what funnybone wants to take a vacation from (note that a preposition is something you shouldn’t end a sentence with). Also, the idea of Joseph giving mussar to anyone would be risible if it wasn’t so pathetic.

    in reply to: Spiritual Level of Rare vs. Well Done Steak #1721307

    Redleg
    Participant

    Just for the sake of playing along with OP, I can think of a reason that any elevation that bread may have over it’s ingredients would not apply to steak or anything similar. in the case of bread, a mixture of simple ingredients, is transformed into a new, vital entity. a teak remains a steak whether it’s rare or well done. No transformation occurs.

    in reply to: Chassidim vs. Beis Yaakov #1720331

    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph, while the Gerrer Rebbe and the CC were early supporters of Sarah Schneirer’s efforts, neither of those two Gedolim can be said to have started the BY movement. The innovator, originator and driving force of Beis Yaakov was Madam Schneirer herself. It is also noteworthy that, with the exception of the two aforementioned Gedolim, virtually the entire “frum” world (people like you, Joseph) were strongly opposed to her innovation.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 425 total)