Redleg

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  • in reply to: What are any issues with serving a role in Conservative Shule? #1761932

    Redleg
    Participant

    Koffee, he (she?) didn’t ask you for a psak. He/she asked for a discussion of the issues involved. Are there any other concerns besides the mixed seating? Does the conservative movement deny Torah min HaShamaim? that would make all of the “mispalellim” (for Joseph, note the quotation marks) kofrim which would be a good reason to avoid any association. Any other issues you can think of?

     

    Edited for civility

    in reply to: Kosher shaver? Phillips One Blade #1760883

    Redleg
    Participant

    I don’t understand what is accomplished by dulling the cutting blade. If the issue with the shaver is tarr, than all you have is a dull tarr, Maye nafke mina? For that matter, what is the specific issur of tarr? Is it the blade against the skin? Is it the closeness of the shave? If the latter, why was samm (depilitory powder) ok? How about a razor cut haircut? The razor is just used to trim the hair, not shave the head. The blade never touches the scalp. In fact, the action of the razor against the comb is not unlike the action of an electric shaver. How about a trimmer (Note 2) with a guard. A #2 would give you that stubble look I mentioned above.
    It seems to me that all psak, especially psak that dealing with technology, needs a detailed explanation . Just saying “assur” is insufficient.
    Note 1: If the specific issur is removal of the beard, then all of the questions above about shaving are moot.
    Note 2: A trimmer works exactly like a scissors, blade against blade.


    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, you were doing fine until you compared Trump to Hitler YM'”S. Stick to stuff you know something about like law. Leave running the Country to wiser heads. P.S. I did not vote for Trump and I may not in 2020. That is if the Democrats can find a candidate with ah IQ higher than his/her shoe size.

    in reply to: YU Bochrim #1757695

    Redleg
    Participant

    Why would any self respecting YU bachur, or any yeshiva bachur for that matter, want to marry your daughter if it meant getting you for a mother-in-law. frankly, your concerns expressed above are trivial to the point of silliness. It is for cases such as this that Chazal tell us that a potential Chasan/Kallah need not follow their parents desires.

    in reply to: Admission Cards #1757689

    Redleg
    Participant

    Relying on “heavy hitters” to make up the shortfall runs into the main difficulty inherent in all redistribution schemes. To quote Margaret Thatcher, “Sooner or later you run out of Other People’s Money”.
    IMO, the main problem is that each school is a separate fiefdom to itself and is often run as a business that relies on tuition and donations to pay its expenses and provide livelihoods for their owners. There is no central Board of Ed that runs all the local schools a public enterprise. An example of this organization is, l’havdil, the Catholic school system where all the schools in the Diocese are run by Diocesan board and supported by general funds.
    What needs to happen is:
    1. Consolidation: Instead of 5 schools with 150 enrollment, why not one school with 600 enrollment? Yeah, I know that there may be differences in hashkofah but so what! Torah is the same for everyone and as are secular studies.
    2. Centralization: All schools the area should be under one administration. Which receives funds and distributes them. (N.B. This already works in homogeneous communities like KJ and New Square. The problem is to get folks to disregard a little of their personal hashkofos for the greater good.)
    3. Funding: While, as CTL so cogently points out, government money comes with a lot of baggage, there is no reason that schools should not accept Jewish money. That means that the schools need to just bite the bullet and join Federation.

    in reply to: Collecting with R’ Chaim on the internet? #1757675

    Redleg
    Participant

    Meno, exactly what are you disagreeing with?

    in reply to: ADHD is EXTREMELY underated #1757674

    Redleg
    Participant

    Of course ADHD is real. the problem is that it is vastly over diagnosed, very often by teachers and menahalim who have no medical training at all. They use ADHD as a crutch to deal with troublesome students, most of whom are simply bored and act out. It’s so much simpler to medicate a bright, active child into submission than to actually work with them.
    Your issue clearly illustrates the “boy who cried wolf” problem. It’s not that the constant false alarms are annoying, it’s that when the wolf does come, no one believes it.

    in reply to: Does Israel need a 3 State Solution #1757669

    Redleg
    Participant

    The Talmidei Ha’Gra are not a good example. They were quite few in number (less than 100), they attempted to be self-supporting by farming and other labor and they relied on funds from abroad to purchase land.
    The idea of an independent Chareidi state is risible. With a net minus economy, no means of defense and the impossibility of creating and sustaining a coherent government, such a state would collapse under its own weight in two years.

    in reply to: The Importance of Having Short Hair #1756249

    Redleg
    Participant

    Up until WW1, wrist watches were only worn by women. Men used pocket watches. Soldiers in the trenches found that wearing your watch on your wrist was much ,more convenient than fishing it out of your pocket while lying on your stomach. Watchmakers started making men’s wrist watches after the war. Also, the reason that many old-timers wear an “up” hat or homberg is that the common snap brim fedora was also exclusively worn by women.


    Redleg
    Participant

    Not really sure of the context. The only frum on-line business that I know of is B&H and their customer service is almost universally known as routinely excellent. I can’t imagine anyone downgrading their references to them. Is Bezos of Amazon Jewish?

    in reply to: Star-K Article about Electric Shavers #1754419

    Redleg
    Participant

    Firstly, it should be noted that the clean shaven European bachurim in the photos were using samm (depilatory powder), not electric shavers, which raises another issue:
    Are those poskim who asser the use of electric shavers doing so because they are under the impression that the shaver blade touches the skin of the face and is, in effect, a sort of mini-tarr, or is the issue that the shaver shaves so close that it LOOKS like the individual shaved with a tarr. If the former, than the clean shaven look of the bachurim in the photos was, you should pardon the expression, completely kosher. On the other hand, if the issue is the latter…
    Another thought: Stubble is sort of fashionable these days and men are using shavers and trimmers to achieve and maintain that “two day shadow” look. Would that be muttar according the poskim cited?
    Personally, the custom of my familythat the tsurah of a married Jew is bearded and I started growing one when I became engaged and have been bearded ever since (except for two brief periods when clean shaven-ness was required for safety reasons).

    in reply to: Star-K Article about Electric Shavers #1750290

    Redleg
    Participant

    For Ploni Doe, samm which I mentioned is the depilatory powder used for shaving that your grandfather used. It was widely used, mostly in Lite and in U.S. Yeshivas back in the fifties when I was in yeshiva. You mixed with water into a green paste and smeared in on your face, let it set for a few minutes and then scraped it and the hair off with a wooden or rubber spatula. It smelled awful but it worked.

    in reply to: Star-K Article about Electric Shavers #1750000

    Redleg
    Participant

    I don’t get it. Virtually all of the photos European bachurim from the 20’s and 30’s from the yeshivas of the Gedolim noted in previous posts show that most were clean shaven. Given that so many of the aforementioned Gedolim were on record as opposing shaving, even with samm, how does one account for the photographic evidence that shaving was customary and wide spread?

    in reply to: Sugya Learning #1745281

    Redleg
    Participant

    The brisket methodology I prefer is slow cooked BBQ style. On the other hand, Brisker methodology is not as you describe. The Brisker method seeks to find underlying principles that unify the various decisions of Chazal. In some respects it resembles Scientific Method which arose contemporaneously. The saying is that in pilpul yeshivos, bucharim can find seven terutzim for one kushia. In Brisk, they find one teretz for seven kushios

    in reply to: Lo Titgodedu? #1743523

    Redleg
    Participant

    Yes, in my view.

    in reply to: Sephardim minhag origin? #1743522

    Redleg
    Participant

    The “shrill scream to which you refer has a name. In English, it’s called ululation and it is common for festivities in Arab and other Middle Eastern cultures.

    in reply to: Do words of hate matter? It’s just words or is it sinister? #1722768

    Redleg
    Participant

    Joey, whether or not the First Amendment is a “Jewish Value”, it is the law of the land in which we find ourselves. Frankly, the First amendment is a good idea in general as the same law that permits hateful speech protects us, our speech and religious practice. Joey should be especially grateful for the First Amendment as it also protects foolish and pointless speech.

    in reply to: Happy Mimouna! #1722258

    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph should know

    in reply to: Kaliv vs other chassidus #1722251

    Redleg
    Participant

    Age doesn’t necessarily convey wisdom nor does youth imply lack of judgement. Shlomo haMelech was twenty (according to the RAMBAN) when he ascended to the the throne of Israel. I think he did a pretty good job, don’t you?

    in reply to: Scranton, PA #1722225

    Redleg
    Participant

    Yeah! be sure to check out the coal mine that’s been on fire since 1962 in nearby Centralia PA.

    in reply to: Do words of hate matter? It’s just words or is it sinister? #1722220

    Redleg
    Participant

    Bigotry, name-calling or any other expressions of hatred, even simple rudeness, are never okay and should be remonstrated against whenever they are encountered (use common sense). I do, however, have a problem with criminalizing thought. A person should be free to think whatever they want. They can hate Jews, Blacks, Muslims, left-handed people, etc as much as they want. So-called “hate speech”, as long as it’s a general statement and not specifically inciting (I.E. “Let’s string ’em up!”) is actually protected speech under the First Amendment, however loathsome it may be, but a specific insult or act of bigotry directed at an individual or group is an assault that needs to be countered by whatever means at their disposal.

    in reply to: Spiritual Level of Rare vs. Well Done Steak #1722214

    Redleg
    Participant

    CT, I agree that well-done is not a good thing to do to a steak in the Olam haGashmi. In fact, most restaurant kitchens use the ends and poorer cuts for “save for well-done”, I.E. for when a customer orders well-done.
    The OP, however, is speaking of the spiritual quality of foods in which case I maintain that no spritiual aliya accrues to to meat according to it’s well-doneness.

    in reply to: vacation for men #1722200

    Redleg
    Participant

    Dachtzach mir, this conversation, and others similar, are precisely what funnybone wants to take a vacation from (note that a preposition is something you shouldn’t end a sentence with). Also, the idea of Joseph giving mussar to anyone would be risible if it wasn’t so pathetic.

    in reply to: Spiritual Level of Rare vs. Well Done Steak #1721307

    Redleg
    Participant

    Just for the sake of playing along with OP, I can think of a reason that any elevation that bread may have over it’s ingredients would not apply to steak or anything similar. in the case of bread, a mixture of simple ingredients, is transformed into a new, vital entity. a teak remains a steak whether it’s rare or well done. No transformation occurs.

    in reply to: Chassidim vs. Beis Yaakov #1720331

    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph, while the Gerrer Rebbe and the CC were early supporters of Sarah Schneirer’s efforts, neither of those two Gedolim can be said to have started the BY movement. The innovator, originator and driving force of Beis Yaakov was Madam Schneirer herself. It is also noteworthy that, with the exception of the two aforementioned Gedolim, virtually the entire “frum” world (people like you, Joseph) were strongly opposed to her innovation.

    in reply to: Echad Mi Yodea in Yiddish #1720187

    Redleg
    Participant

    We always sang it in Yiddish. My zeide, My father, me and now my son. at our respective Sedorim

    in reply to: Which suit do i wear? #1714307

    Redleg
    Participant

    In the ultimate scheme of things, The character of the person in the suit is what’s important, not the color. If you’re more comfortable wearing the “uniform”, by all means wear that. If not, wear something else. The Eibishter knows who and what you are no matter what your wearing.

    in reply to: Darchei Binah Sem Girls Coming For Shabbos #1660145

    Redleg
    Participant

    Meno,, Seriously?

    in reply to: Darchei Binah Sem Girls Coming For Shabbos #1659432

    Redleg
    Participant

    You know, Avrohom Avienu didn’t check what kind of sweatshirts the three Arabs were wearing when they showed up at his tent. Nor did he give them a questionnaire to fill out. Hachnosas Orchim is an important mitzva and a great zchus. Don’t trivialize it.


    Redleg
    Participant

    T22T, Ray Aharon Feldman, Shlit”a is not a posek either.

    in reply to: Ruach hakodesh poll #1652006

    Redleg
    Participant

    What is the definition of “ruach hakodesh (henceforth RH)”? It is impossible to discuss any inyan without precise definition. If RH is defined as “Divine inspiration” then it is clear that anyone, even non-Jews, can experience it.
    If RH is sort of semi-nevuah, I would say that any Jew with the proper Kavanahs and preparations could experience it.

    The Rebono Shel Olam can speak to all of his people, not just the “elites”

    in reply to: All Natural Way to Prevent Disease #1651441

    Redleg
    Participant

    Um.. RB, Your description of “natural” disease prevention is basically a description of vaccination. – controlled exposure to pathogens to stimulate the immune system to create antibodies that provide resistance to said pathogen.

    in reply to: We need a new inyan for Nittel Nacht #1651440

    Redleg
    Participant

    You know, I’m in Israel this week and it strikes me that the proper way for Jews to conduct themselves today is how it’s done here. In Israel, Nittel”, unless it falls on Friday, is just an ordinary evening. Folks just go about their business, whatever their business is, as always. The yeshivos are open for night seder, Batei Medrashim are,in service. The following day is, also, just an ordinary day (unless it happens to be Shabbos). Those who celebrate the day do so as they wish. Basically non-Jewish holidays are dealt with the way Jewish holidays are dealt with in the U.S.
    I see no reason to alter one’s normal routine in learning, business or family time for “Nittel”

    in reply to: Would you re-elect trump?!?! #1650094

    Redleg
    Participant

    You mean, ” Would I vote to re-elect Trump.” The answer is that it depends. There is no doubt that Trump is something of a mixed bag as POTUS. He started out strong but lately his ego and his arrogance are getting in the way of good governance. Also, bear in mind that he didn’t so much win the election in 2016 but that Hillary blew it. The up side of that was that Hillary was not only even more ego driven and arrogant than Trump, she was also dumb as a brick.
    back to the OP’s question, Would I vote for Trump in 2020, The answer is a conditional “yes” unless:
    1. Trump does something so egregiously stupid that I decide he cannot be allowed another term
    2. The Democrats run a candidate who is not a radical Socialist, Progressive anti-Semite, America hater
    but who espouses reasonable policies at least some of which I support. ( Highly unlikely but possible)
    3. There is a primary fight in the GOP and Trump loses in which case I will probably support the
    Republican candidate unless he’s a complete duffus and the Dems select option 2. (N.B. can’t vote for
    Trump if he isn’t the candidate)

    in reply to: Girls' seminary in Israel #1648986

    Redleg
    Participant

    I have mixed feelings about the whole post-HS Seminary-in-Israel meme. First, full disclosure. I have, so far, sent three daughters and one grand daughter to Seminary in Israel with rather mixed results. My two oldest daughters had negative experiences in Sem, one of which actually closed down in mid year. My youngest daughter and my grand daughter, on the other hand, had wonderful experiences and both grew in Torah knowledge, yiras shamayim, and maturity. As well as getting college credits for their continued education if the so desired.
    It seems to me that if your daughter is, as you describe here , neither academically inclined nor particularly open to new experiences, I wonder why you’re willing to spend $30-40K on a program from which your daughter’s net gain will be small. There are fine seminaries here in the U.S. that would be better suited to her needs and desires and that cost two thirds less. The seminary in Cleveland (forgot the name) would be a good fit hashkafically as well as giving her a bit of the out-of-town experience.

    in reply to: Let’s Register Our Children To Public School #1648479

    Redleg
    Participant

    Just a note on the Dred Scott decision: The Supreme court did not reverse the decision. It was the 13th and 14th amendments to the Constitution that rendered the decision moot.


    Redleg
    Participant

    Ordinarily, this would be a simple protocol issue with no particular political significance but these days, everything seems to have political significance including what tooth paste CT uses. Frankly CT, my guess is probably better than yours and I’d guess that protocol will be followed, if only because the President will be too busy with “affairs of State” to concern himself with it.


    Redleg
    Participant

    Ah, the benefits of a Yeshiva education! It’s “meticulous”!

    in reply to: Vegas Massacre: 59 Good Reasons to Outlaw Automatic Weapons #1612549

    Redleg
    Participant

    A few comments
    Automatic Weapons: In the course of operation, all firearms perform 5 operations, they are:
    1. Feeding. The cartridge is placed in position for step 2
    2. Chambering. The cartridge is pushed into the firing chamber and locked in
    3. Firing. Self-explanatory
    4. Extraction. The chamber is unlocked and the spent cartridge case extracted from the chamber.
    5. Ejection. The spent cartridge case is thrown clear of the firearm.
    These five steps in order constitute one cycle. Note that all firearms perform these functions whether they operate automatically or manually.
    Automatic weapons will begin to cycle when the trigger is depressed and continue to cycle as long as the trigger is held back. Semi-automatic weapons (sometimes called self-loading weapons) will perform one cycle when the trigger is depressed, but require the trigger to be reset and depressed again for each cycle. Both automatic and semi-automatic weapons use some of the energy of the firing cycle to operate the action; other firearms are operated by manual manipulation.
    As to the legality of automatic weapons, prior to 1935 fully automatic weapons could be purchased freely in the U.S. (A magazine ad for the Auto Ordnance company in 1928 depicts a cowboy using a Thompson sub-machine gun to drive off cattle rustlers) The National Firearms Act of 1935 required that purchasers or owners of certain classes of weapons, automatic weapons among them, obtain a federal license to possess. This did not prohibit ownership of these weapons, only that they be licensed. Actual prohibition is left up to the States with some permitting and others prohibiting, for instance, New York totally prohibits the possession of automatic weapons while Massachusetts and Pennsylvania permit ownership with proper Federal licensing.
    In addition to automatic weapons, the National Firearms Act (NFA) of 1935 also required that a Federal License be obtained to purchase and/or own short barreled rifles and shotguns, suppressors (silencers) and destructive devices (hand grenades, C4, dynamite). would a nuclear device be considered a destructive device under the NFA and require a Federal license?
    With regard to a popular armed uprising, google “battle of Athens Tennessee”

    in reply to: Female Police Handling Men #1601333

    Redleg
    Participant

    Rachel, ” Innocent until proven guilty” applies in not just some but in all cases. However, the Police do not need to prove someone guilty before arresting them. All they need is “probable cause” to believe that the individual has committed a crime or offense, like disobeying a lawful order or resisting arrest. Guilt or innocence is decided by a Court of Law.

    in reply to: Good husband = Good father? #1600601

    Redleg
    Participant

    Folks tend to parent (when did that become a verb) pretty much as they were parented, so if follows that a good indicatiion of how good a parent any prospective spouse will be is to look at his/her relationship with his/her parents. That’s how it worked before all of the published advice on parenting (often from non-parents).

    Joe, babies may come naturally but parenting is a learned behavior.


    Redleg
    Participant

    After some thought, i sent my DNA sample (test tube of saliva) to Ancestry.com for analysis. The initial result was: 85% European Jewish, 12% Middle Eastern, 3% undetermined. I received an update from them a couple of weeks ago. based on (they said) an expanded data base. The revision shows me to be 100% European Jewish with the epicenter of my genome in historic Lithuania (based on their map of likely origins).

    N.B. Ancestry’s category is “European” Jewish, Not “Ashkenazi”

    in reply to: If you were president #1595306

    Redleg
    Participant

    Has anyone actually read Article II of the US Constitution which defines the powers of the President? The President does not have the Constitutional power to effect any of the suggestions presented so far. The President does not make law. That’s the job of Congress. Over the years, Presidents, mostly Democrats starting with FDR, have arrogated some of the powers of Congress to themselves by issuing “Executive Orders” ala B. Obama (N.B. The Executive orders issued by the current President have been almost entirely used to rescind those issued by the previous White House infestation.) Nevertheless, the President has no Constitutional power to make the decrees listed by the OP. With respect to 2nd Amendment issues. Neither the President nor the Congress could make such a law . The President, or Congress, could no more arbitrarily modify the 2nd Amendment than they could limit free speech or allow warrant-less searches bu Police. The current law prohibits four classes of Citizens from possessing fire arms. Convicted felons, those convicted of misdemeanor spousal abuse, those adjudged incompetent by the court and those involuntarily committed, again by a court. Note that all four categories have been so prohibited, not by Presidential decree, but by due process.

    in reply to: Best Welfare Rules #1592428

    Redleg
    Participant

    The Romans tried that over 2000 years ago. didn’t work then either. recently, Finland, a small homogeneous country where some thing like that should have the best chance of working, tried it too. the dropped it like a hot rock after two years.

    in reply to: On What Siddur is the Artscroll Based? #1591132

    Redleg
    Participant

    In the YI style minyan in Florida that I daven in they say the Yom after Shacharis as per the MB cited above. Is that the official YI nusach?

    in reply to: Parental involvement in shidduchim #1575129

    Redleg
    Participant

    While it is traditional for parents to be involved in shidduchim for their children, the unterste shurah (bottom line) is that the decision belongs to the chasan and kallah. There is no inyan of kibud av in this case. While it is unlikely to happen in this case, if the girl feels strongly about it, she is free, both morally and halachicky, to ignore her mother’s advice and should, in fact, do so.

    in reply to: Satmar Yor Tzeit #1575125

    Redleg
    Participant

    This is trivial but it annoys me nevertheless. While some hebrew/yiddish terms don’t have a regular transliteration, Yahzeit isn’t one of them. Yahrzeit, being a regular word in German and in Yiddish, has a standard spelling as shown.

    P.S. the “Z” in German is oronounces “TS”.

    in reply to: Shuls in Boca Raton or Hollywood, FL #1574929

    Redleg
    Participant

    Sish, yeah, i know. I was just referring to the new facility. The old one was a store front.

    in reply to: Shuls in Boca Raton or Hollywood, FL #1574442

    Redleg
    Participant

    The big one. Boca Raton Synagogue (BRS) on Montoya Circle is a full service facility. Multiple minyanim in the nusach of your choice. Day and night Kolel, Shiyurim for all including shiyurim for women. BRS also includes K-12 day school/yeshiva.

    Also new Chabad Center on SR7 (US441) at Kinberly

    in reply to: Quotes #1569032

    Redleg
    Participant

    When life hands you lemons, take them because.., Hey! free lemons

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