Redleg

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  • in reply to: What to do in upcoming Thunderstorm #1890035
    Redleg
    Participant

    Sam Klein’s post reminded me of a well-known story. I goes something like this:
    A hurricane was approaching and the police drove through a particularly vulnerable neighborhood advising the residents to evacuate. One man refused, saying that he had complete faith that G-d would protect him. The storm came and the neighborhood was indeed flooded. The man had retreated to an upstairs room when the Police came by in a boat and offered to rescue him. The man again refused saying that G-d would surely protect him. The flood waters continued to rise, driving the man to the roof of his house. A Coast Guard helicopter appeared, dropped a rope ladder and urged the man to climb the ladder into the helicopter and be saved. Once again, the man refused, again affirming his complete faith in G-d and His salvation. Finally, the wind and flood waters overcame the man and he was swept away and drowned. When the man’s neshama reaches Olam HaBah, he has taynehs! “Eibisher, I had complete Emunah in You! Why didn’t You save me?” The Rebono shel Olam replied, “What do you mean? I sent a cop, a boat and a helicopter!”

    in reply to: How did the Poskim deal with the Spanish Flu? #1890032
    Redleg
    Participant

    It appears that no one is addressing my specific question. During the Influenza pandemic of 1918-1919, epidemiology and infectious disease transmission were fairly well understood. While the internet and satellite communications were, of course, far in the future, telegraph, telephone, intranational cable and even early radio were available for dissemination of news and information. In the U.S., for instance, quarantine, social distancing, even wearing masks were recommended (but not required) by local and State authorities.
    My question was, at that time and under those conditions, How did contemporary Poskim rule on the same issues that we have been dealing with these days, I.E. closing yeshivas and shuls, outdoor minyanim, Etc.

    in reply to: Used furniture #1888250
    Redleg
    Participant

    Try the Good Will store.

    in reply to: What kind of police reforms do we need? #1886218
    Redleg
    Participant

    Yes, transparency in police practices and personnel records is important but real change requires requires the following:
    1. Police departments need to establish and publish arrest “Rules of Engagement” (hor lack of a better term) detailing all procedures for interaction with the public at large as well as with arrestees.
    2. Individual Police officers need to be held personally responsible, both criminally and civilly, for injuries and offences committed in violation of the published rules.
    3. As far as the use of deadly force is concerned, police officers should not fire their weapons unless they, themselves, are fired upon or a citizen is in imminent threat of death or grave bodily harm. I have often heard police officers claim that “their first job is to get back safe to their families at night”. Wrong! A cop’s first job is to make sure that I and other citizens get back safe to our families. If the cop can do it to, great, but it’s not in his job description.

    in reply to: A basic Torah Hashkafa unknown to some. #1874325
    Redleg
    Participant

    Notwithstanding the issue under discussion, LY’s use of the term “homophobia” is one of my pet peeves. This current coinage is silly. A phobia is an irrational fear or loathing. Homo simply refers to human beings (genus Homo), so “homophobia” actually means an irrational fear or loathing of human beings.

    in reply to: Civil Disobedience #1865780
    Redleg
    Participant

    Reb Eliezer, we are NOT strangers or guests in the U.S. We are full citizens with all the rights and responsibilities appertaining thereto. We need not step aside for, nor or defer to, anyone. If you feel uncomfortable here or that you’re a guest or stranger here, there is a place where you can go. Oh, and don’t give me that nonsense about “Jews felt at home in Germany, etc.” The U.S. ain’t Germany in any way, shape or form.

    Joseph, Avi Wiess did break the law and was legitimately subject to punishment,but he was morally correct to take the actions he did in calling attention to the injustices he saw.

    in reply to: Lawsuit in NJ to force the state to allow worship service #1858840
    Redleg
    Participant

    ” We are better served the less they have to parse their directives to address personal freedoms. My freedoms could wait for better times.”
    n0m, that’s very dangerous thinking. The very idea of abrogating or limiting Constitutionally guaranteed rights simply to make things a bit easier for the Government, time of crisis or not, is a slippery slope to totalitarianism. Slippery slope? It’s a damned avalanche! Your freedoms can wait? They may be waiting a long time.

    in reply to: Reader Responds to Seminary Woes #1858432
    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph, there is a Yiddish saying, ” A Goyishe vertel iz, l’havdil, a Toyreh.”. In that vein, you would do well to heed the famous ma’amar of Sen. Patrick Moynehan. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion. They’re not entitled to their own facts.” Your OPINION vis a vis sem in Israel is reasonable, but it doesn’t necessarily contitue TRUTH.

    in reply to: Has trump finally snapped? #1855509
    Redleg
    Participant

    I’m inclined to agree with Coffee Adict That the Pres was just thinking out loud, but it was an inopportune time to do it. Actually President Trump has done a fairly good job overall. His handling of the economy and foreign relations has been quite good. His handling of the current pandemic could have been better ( I give him about a B-) but that’s in hindsight. Anybody can be a Monday morning quarterback. Bear in mind that he has to weigh the response to the disease and the effect on the economy. No one wants to lose more lives, but no one wants the Country to go into the toilet either. President Trump’s problem is that he has no filter. You know that little thing in your head that tells you that maybe you shouldn’t say what you are about to? Well, President Trump hasn’t got one of those.

    in reply to: Lack of kovid hatorah. #1850908
    Redleg
    Participant

    Beast, you could give yourself a G.I. haircut fairly easily. Leave the payos

    in reply to: Garlic for Coronavirus #1843109
    Redleg
    Participant

    If nothing else, garlic will help maintain the required social distancing.

    in reply to: Coronavirus versus the Seasonal Flu #1843129
    Redleg
    Participant

    chloroquine & hydrochloroquine are not commonly prescribed drugs so the stocks are low. The Military has some stocks of Chloroquine which is given to troops serving is some areas for Malaria prophylaxis. When I was in the Service overseas, we were given chloroquine once a week (every Monday) to prevent getting Malaria.

    in reply to: A spy #1835922
    Redleg
    Participant

    What does your company or you do that would interest anybody? I work for a company that designs an builds power plants but our technology is so old that even the Chinese don’t want it.

    in reply to: Pointless #1835900
    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph, My comment was half (only half) in jest. Sometimes, on the basis that even a blind squirrel finds a nut once in a while, you do, occasionally, posit a lucid idea which which I may agree. usually though, your posts read (and sound) like the incoherent ramblings of a surgical patient just coming out of anesthesia.

    in reply to: Put Donald Trump on the Rock #1835894
    Redleg
    Participant

    Akuperma, I would argue that, without taking anything away from Truman who was, in hindsight, a much better President that the Republicans made him out to be, the greatest President of the latter half of the 20th century is Ronald Reagan.

    Joe, get you hammer and chisel and head out to South Dakota. I’ll pack you sandwiches.

    in reply to: Going local for Mesivta versus out of town #1835884
    Redleg
    Participant

    As one who went away to mesifta/yeshiva at age 14 and who sent his son away at the same age (to the same place), I can report that there are benefits to doing so. I have found that there were fewer distractions OOT. It is easier to concentrate on learning and shtayg away from the familiar distracting home dynamic of travel, outside interests, etc.
    That is not to say that there are no difficulties with living in a dorm. While the rebbeim and mashgichim supervise the boys closely, ways can still be found to go outside the box, as it were. For instance, I learned to smoke in yeshiva. Also, dorm life has it’s tests and dangers that bachurim have to learn to avoid.
    Sending your son away requires that you know and trust your son. In my experience, the benefits clearly outweighed the drawbacks.

    in reply to: Pointless #1834824
    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph, don’t flatter yourself. The only effect that you might have on other’s opinions is to convince them to hold the opposite of whatever you espouse.

    in reply to: What happens if the Corona Virus spreads to the U.S. #1827221
    Redleg
    Participant

    Based on the numbers report from China, It appears that the overall death rate for this disease is about 10%. Don’t know about the demographics but it’s probably higher among older people and and infants.
    The “Spanish Flu” pandemic of 1918-19 was the the worst one in history including the Black Death. It killed some 50,000,000 people world-wide. It was also unique in that the population most affected were the young and middle-aged, not the aged and very young as one would expect.

    Redleg
    Participant

    Dubai doesn’t care what your religion, or ethnicity or, country of origin is as long as you bring money.

    in reply to: returning to amazon #1826724
    Redleg
    Participant

    Also note that B&H, a well known Jewish company, is famous for it’s liberal return policy. Whatever halachic issues that pertain to returns would certainly apply to them.

    in reply to: Auto body repair at home #1806632
    Redleg
    Participant

    A simple dent with no tearing or paint damage can simply be pulled out with a suction tool or similar which is available in most auto parts stores. replacement of some damaged parts like a bumper, a hood, or any other detachable part could be done in your driveway. Repair of more extensive damage needs a shop with a frame straightening table, air tools, welding machines and a paint booth.

    in reply to: Why does my son’s Rebbi have a smartphone ? #1806624
    Redleg
    Participant

    A few months ago, Business week ran a survey of the most common uses of smart phones. It found that, after communication (voice, text and email) the next two by a wide margin, were searching for specific information, like,”What time does the Costco in Spring Valley close”, and navigation. The idea that the hammon am spends significant time searching for and viewing salacious material and that, but for our constant vigilance, we might fall into such a trap, is transparent nonsense.

    in reply to: Despicable Middos of our Hero #1786924
    Redleg
    Participant

    A couple of thoughts:
    1. The President of the United States is, in fact, the Rosh Memshala (Head of State) as well as the Head of Government. In a Parliamentary system such as in the UK or Israel, the Heads of State and Government are separated, I.E. a Queen or President and a Prime Minister. In the U.S. the President serves both functions. In addition, the President is also Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces as well as Chief Law Enforcement Officer
    2. Heroes don’t necessarily have to possess good midos to be heroic. Even in our own Tradition, Yiftach and Shimson weren’t particularly good role models but were certainly heroes.

    in reply to: Recession is all the Democrats fault! #1778580
    Redleg
    Participant

    What recession?

    in reply to: An amendment to protect hunters #1776150
    Redleg
    Participant

    The right to hunt is covered by the ninth amendment. The second amendment refers only to self defense and defense of the community. In 1938, SCOTUS in U.S. v Miller ruled that only weapons suitable for military formations are covered by the second amendment.

    in reply to: GGWG Militia #1774889
    Redleg
    Participant

    Milhouse, SCOTUS agrees with you. See Heller v District of Columbia
    Joseph, lot o’ luck with that one.

    in reply to: Eating Fish #1771146
    Redleg
    Participant

    Juvenile swordfish do have scales which they lose as they grow into adulthood.

    in reply to: Is it ‘un-manly’ to take kids to the park? #1770650
    Redleg
    Participant

    I think you need an attitude adjustment

    in reply to: restaurant on first date??? #1767628
    Redleg
    Participant

    Wow, CTL! What a blast from the past. Lou G. Siegal (I always found that their meat dishes were a trifle too salty), Moshe Peking, etc. I bet that you’re almost as old as I am.

    in reply to: learning from an artscroll #1767629
    Redleg
    Participant

    The main issue for yeshiva high school and first year BM is to learn how to make a leining. The problem is two fold. the first, is to understand how the gemora is organized and to be able to able to follow the shakla v’tarya. The second, and frankly the harder of the two, is learning the translation of technical terms. Back in the day, the primary tool for translation was Jastrow. Yeah, he was a shtikel apikores but the translations were extremely accurate. The system of learning inside and going to Jastrow when necessary, gave one the tools for life long learning. Along comes the Soncino Sha’as. While the translation was also quite accurate (frankly, more accurate than Artschroll). The daf by daf format was distracting and required less internalizing translation and p’shat.
    Enter Artschroll. With Artschroll the system is reversed. The English text and explanations become the ikkar and the original daf is just for reference. Now, that’s fine in that it opens up learning for those who may not have developed the skills alluded to above and adds to the general accumulated understanding of p’shat, but it eliminates any requirement to actually know how to learn.
    So the maskana seems to be that Artschroll has its place but it is not a substitute for learning inside.

    in reply to: Why is Yad Soledes Bo so Cold? #1767622
    Redleg
    Participant

    Different poskim have different values for yad soledes bo (YSB). I have seen values from as low as 110 degrees F to as high as 160 degrees. Current practice is to use both values l’chumrah. As a side note, I wonder how some poskim came up with their published values for YSB. Clearly, in the times of the Gemora, there was no way to objectively determine objective values for temperatures lower than boiling water. I have always understood that YSB was a temperature which was not simply uncomfortably hot but a temperature at which one’s hand would reflexively recoil. To my mind, the commonly accepted lower limit of 110 does not come close to meeting the the description.

    in reply to: Which famous people have you met? #1767623
    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, as a digression, you mentioned having had business dealings with “the Donald”. How did you find dealing with him as a person? A couple of my acquaintances who have done business with the Trump organization tell me that they found him to be rather a nice fellow.

    P.S. Doesn’t your shoulder get sore from patting yourself on the back so often?

    in reply to: Meteor Shower #1767624
    Redleg
    Participant

    Oseh Ma’ase Bereishis

    in reply to: Will Classical Music Come Back in Style? #1765949
    Redleg
    Participant

    Agree with RebYidd23

    in reply to: Do you ever wonder how a random Yidd is doing? #1765952
    Redleg
    Participant

    Frankly, i’m mildly annoyed when folks use the term “Yid” when writing in English. What’s wrong with calling a Jew a Jew? Is a “Yid” somehow different from a “Jew”? Also, when writing in English, I prefer using the term “gentile” to describe a non-Jewish person rather then using the transliterations of “Goy” or “Eino Yehudi”, not to mention derogatory names like “Shaygitz”. English is a very precise language with the largest vocabulary of any language, Use it. Oh, and don’t tell me that some Jewish concepts or Gemorrah terms have now English translation. That is rubbish. People who say that simply don’t know English well enough.

    Redleg
    Participant

    Joseph is correct. (Ouch!! that hurt to say) Pennsylvania “Dutch” Is “Deutsche”. A dialect of German called Mittel Hoch Deutche which, incidentally, is the root language of Yiddish.

    in reply to: The Importance of Having Short Hair #1765611
    Redleg
    Participant

    “What’s in your head is more important than what’s on you head.” that goes for hair as well as hats and kipos.

    in reply to: Is Harry Potter kosher #1765610
    Redleg
    Participant

    Cholent is apparently put off by someone who actually speaks (and writes) English. Okay, for you we’ll confine ourselves to words of two or less syllables (That means “small words” for you, Cholent)

    in reply to: Will Classical Music Come Back in Style? #1765609
    Redleg
    Participant

    Classical music has never gone out of style although it is evolving. The funny thing is that people today sometimes don’t realize that what we call “classical music” was the pop music of it’s time. Ever hear of Lisztomania? It was the 18th Century version of Beatlemania. Franz Liszt and other composers and performers were the rock stars of their time. When I went to yeshiva, back in the Late Bronze Age,my RY said that all melodies were kosher except for those that were identifiable as liturgy (e.g. Silent Night).

    in reply to: Can a husband bring down his wife (take her farther from Hashem)? #1765608
    Redleg
    Participant

    I get the impression that the people who are having difficulty with the question have never been married. I cannot imagine a married man who doesn’t feel that his wife has made him a better person, both religiously and personally. Mrs. Redleg has certainly helped make me so. This is what Eizer Kenegdo means.

    in reply to: The wrong impression #1765607
    Redleg
    Participant

    Neville, the issue is about identifiable Jews acting poorly. Anonymous Jews don’t pose the same problem.
    Also, how could could any udentifiable Chasid make a real Jew feel inadequate?

    in reply to: The moon or mars #1765004
    Redleg
    Participant

    Re Kiddush Levana on Mars: Mars has two moons, Phobos and Deimos. Both are much smaller than Earth’s moon .but closer. Phobos ‘s orbital period is about 7.6 hours and Deimos, being further away, has a period of a little more that 30 hrs, (our moon has an orbital period of 29 days) Which one would be used to calculate the month? Mars’ own year is 637 days and a Mars day is just a few minutes longer than ours. so do the math. Mars year is about 15,300 hours divided by 30 hrs (using Deimos) = 510 months in a Martian year. That should keep you busy.

    in reply to: Is Harry Potter kosher #1764998
    Redleg
    Participant

    Rowling’s ex parte description of Dumbledore’s predilection brings up an interesting machlokes in the theory of Literary Criticism referred to in those circles as “the Death of the Author”. The question is whether the characters and story exist in the author’s mind, in which case it is perfectly understandable that the author can offer perush and explanation of his or her work or, say, describe what his or her characters do after the end of the published work, or do the characters and story only exist on the printed page. Any activity or character development outside of the text is unknown and unknowable because the author is (figuratively) dead. In the latter case, if it is not mentioned in the text it doesn’t exist.

    in reply to: Is Social Security a Ponzi scheme? #1764973
    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, OK call it an unitended Ponzi scheme. In the original 1934 (?) version, SS was, indeed, intended to pay out from funds derived from interest on investments in obligations. The problem arose when the obligations in which the SS fund was invested was mostly T Bills which meant that the government was using SS contributions as general funds, I.E. borrowing from itself. Once SS started having to pay benefits from later contributions, it became a pyramid scheme. Like all such multi layer schemes, as long as the base of the pyramid keep s growing, everything is cool. The problem that SS is facing is that the number of younger contributors is shrinking while the number of folks receiving benefits is growing. If the SS fund was a real fund as it was sold as, that would be a lesser problem. The fact is, though, that the benefits being paid come directly from the contribution of those working and paying. That’s the very definition of a pyramid scheme, intentional or not.

    in reply to: Is Social Security a Ponzi scheme? #1764638
    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, Your description is a distinction without a difference. The key isn’t taxpayers or investors, it is the characteristic of both schemes, Ponzi or SS, is that, rather than paying out benefits to the contributors/investors from the profits supposedly accruing to the fund’s activities, they use the payments from later participants to fund the benefits paid to the earlier participants.

    in reply to: Stories of Gedolim and the Moon Launch #1763399
    Redleg
    Participant

    “He made statements about the “rotation” of the Sun and the moon relative to the earth and the size of the moon relative to the sun and earth which were not accurate by today’ standards.”

    His statements were not accurate, period. As was noted, the RAMBAM was simply repeating the prevalent understanding in his time.
    Referring to “today’s standard” implies that, perhaps sometime in the future, it may be discovered that the universe really is geocentric which, of course, would be nonsense.

    in reply to: The moon or mars #1763398
    Redleg
    Participant

    The moon or mars

    Yes

    in reply to: What are any issues with serving a role in Conservative Shule? #1761932
    Redleg
    Participant

    Koffee, he (she?) didn’t ask you for a psak. He/she asked for a discussion of the issues involved. Are there any other concerns besides the mixed seating? Does the conservative movement deny Torah min HaShamaim? that would make all of the “mispalellim” (for Joseph, note the quotation marks) kofrim which would be a good reason to avoid any association. Any other issues you can think of?

     

    Edited for civility

    in reply to: Kosher shaver? Phillips One Blade #1760883
    Redleg
    Participant

    I don’t understand what is accomplished by dulling the cutting blade. If the issue with the shaver is tarr, than all you have is a dull tarr, Maye nafke mina? For that matter, what is the specific issur of tarr? Is it the blade against the skin? Is it the closeness of the shave? If the latter, why was samm (depilitory powder) ok? How about a razor cut haircut? The razor is just used to trim the hair, not shave the head. The blade never touches the scalp. In fact, the action of the razor against the comb is not unlike the action of an electric shaver. How about a trimmer (Note 2) with a guard. A #2 would give you that stubble look I mentioned above.
    It seems to me that all psak, especially psak that dealing with technology, needs a detailed explanation . Just saying “assur” is insufficient.
    Note 1: If the specific issur is removal of the beard, then all of the questions above about shaving are moot.
    Note 2: A trimmer works exactly like a scissors, blade against blade.

    Redleg
    Participant

    CTL, you were doing fine until you compared Trump to Hitler YM'”S. Stick to stuff you know something about like law. Leave running the Country to wiser heads. P.S. I did not vote for Trump and I may not in 2020. That is if the Democrats can find a candidate with ah IQ higher than his/her shoe size.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 447 total)