catch yourself

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  • in reply to: Government programs #1307187

    catch yourself
    Participant

    It against the Halacha to lie or bend the truth, even without monetary gain. It is against the Halacha to accept any form of monetary benefit to which you are not entitled.

    in reply to: The one failing of Jewish music #1305594

    catch yourself
    Participant

    I think MBDs תמחה את זכר עמלק should do nicely.

    in reply to: Are Rebbeim getting paid enough? #1303303

    catch yourself
    Participant

    @ Akuperma –
    1. True. Most Rebbeim recognize the supreme privilege of their vocation.
    2. False. It isn’t about the money, and many people prefer to be מלמד תורה than to do anything else (as you yourself pointed out). There does, however, come a time for many where they are forced to change jobs for financial reasons (living gets more expensive as time goes on and families grow and get older). This is what the OP is talking about.
    3. True, in the current model. I don’t know what the solution is, but I worry about the sustainability of the system as it now stands.

    in reply to: New York to the rescue – NOT #1294753

    catch yourself
    Participant

    This has been a pet peeve of mine for years. Some of my neighbors in our “OOT” community seem to believe that certain products are better purchased from NY area stores. Friends, if you want there to be a frum clothing store, seforim store, etc., in your neighborhood, then you need to give them your business. This is the selfish reason; obviously, there are also issues of Halacha and Hashkafa, as pointed out by Joseph.

    in reply to: Reliable Hashgacha? #1292676

    catch yourself
    Participant

    You apparently agree with the classification of the other Hashgachos I listed as Litvish. I can imagine my friends of German extraction protesting vehemently the inclusion of KAJ in said list. I acknowledge that the term Litvish is that context was a misnomer, intended to refer to Hashgachos that are “not Chassidish.”
    I’m not here to debate the reputations of specific Hashgachos, a slippery slope landing in the cesspool of LH, MShR, and so on. In hindsight, it was probably wrong to name names in the first place, as Avak LH.

    in reply to: Reliable Hashgacha? #1292068

    catch yourself
    Participant

    In my last post, I mistakenly referred to the first post on this page as the OP.
    I was referring to post #1289359.

    in reply to: Reliable Hashgacha? #1292066

    catch yourself
    Participant

    In all of this, I found the OP to be the most troubling post in the whole thread. The assertion that “a few cases where we’ve seen over the years” of corruption could completely discredit an entire segment of K’lal Yisrael for the issue of Kashrus is outrageous.

    The premise that no similar incidents have occurred among Chassidishe Hashgachos is ignorance.

    What of KAJ, Star-K, KCL, CRC, OU, Kof-K, and many more, all Litvishe Hashgachos of excellent repute?

    What of the great number of local Va’adim, also Litvishe Hashgachos of top-notch quality?

    You magnanimously concede that there are “some competent Litvishe Hashgachos,” but in the same breath, you dispose of them because of “a few” isolated incidents “over the years.”

    For shame.

    in reply to: ANOTHER Ezras Nashim Horror Story?! #1292057

    catch yourself
    Participant

    I don’t חס ושלום believe the story. Nevertheless, למיחש מיבעי, and until a responsible, credible review is published which affirms that the quality of care provided by EN is on par, I would have to rely on good old Hatzalah in case of emergency, ר”ל.

    ה’ ישמרנו מכל צרה וצוקה

    in reply to: Question for FuturePotus ❓ #1286335

    catch yourself
    Participant

    I obviously can’t debate a Psak that has not been explained, but I think it’s important to make this point: People often use the term “Lashon Hara” as an umbrella term which encompasses all forms of forbidden speech, such as Ona’as Devarim, Motzi Shem Ra, Rechilus, Megaleh Sod, Malbin Pnei Chaveiro, et al. If the reasoning for the Psak was a technicality limited to Lashon Hara in its narrow sense (such as Apei Tlasa), then either the Shaila was presented incorrectly, or the Posek needs to do a better job of understanding Shailos. The question was not whether the particular post was Lashon Hara per se, but whether it was permitted to post.

    In any case, to the extent that I am not being allowed to know either the identity of the Posek or the reason for the Psak, there is no reason for me to consider it authoritative, especially considering that it is at odds with my own understanding of the Halachos.

    A new cycle of Chofetz Chaim Yomi starts today, so maybe this time I will figure it out…

    in reply to: Question for FuturePotus ❓ #1282257

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Like you said, it certainly is not for those who are not qualified in Psak Halacha to disagree with those who are. Nevertheless, there is no reason to withhold the reasoning of the Psak that was issued. I, for one, would love to gain a better education.

    in reply to: Why the husband is in the driver’s seat 🤵🚗 #1282168

    catch yourself
    Participant

    My wife is an excellent driver, but she does not like to drive, so she usually prefers to be a passenger.

    in reply to: I am aware that it’s no joke 🚫🃏 #1281026

    catch yourself
    Participant

    “Neurotypicals” – Brilliant.

    Rav Shamshon Refael Hirsch on המבלי אין קברים במצרים לקחתנו למות במדבר notes that already at the banks of the Yam Suf, the Jewish sense of humor, in all its sarcastic glory, was a natural outlet for psychological stress, a role it would continue to play during the millennia of Galus that would follow later.

    The only caveat, as pointed out above, is to make sure that those who hear you will not misunderstand and take offense.

    in reply to: Question for FuturePotus ❓ #1281010

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Look, 29, I don’t want to belabor the point, but I think you’re right that it’s important to interpret posts properly.
    There is a time when schools communicate expectations for students and families associated with their system. Typically, this is during summer vacation in a student handbook or the like.
    By (supposedly) mentioning the expectation about shirt colors in the context of application, the implicit message that the school communicated is that wearing the “wrong” short could jeopardize the acceptance of the student.
    It seems to me that any other reading of it is a contrivance, concocted, perhaps, in the spirit of Dan Lkaf Zchus, but this was not the intent of the post in question.

    in reply to: Question for FuturePotus ❓ #1280569

    catch yourself
    Participant

    29, I have a lot of respect for you, based on what I’ve observed from your work in the few years that I’ve been in the CR. In this case, however, I think you are mistaken.

    Of course, it is true that posts are often misunderstood, misquoted and conflated. I have even misquoted my own post in the same thread! Certainly, when this happens, it should be pointed out.

    In my opinion, however, the particular post under discussion was not such a case. Its meaning and implication were unambiguous, as explained quite clearly by LU above. The distinction between, “They said that if I wear blue shirts they would not accept my daughter,” and “They strongly intimated – in the context of school application – that I should not wear blue shirts, but they stopped short of saying that they wouldn’t accept her if I do,” is specious, especially when the tone (and only possible achievement) of the post is derision of a community.

    in reply to: Question for FuturePotus ❓ #1280498

    catch yourself
    Participant

    LU, thanks for standing up for what is right in all of this.

    29, you’re dancing between the raindrops. The OP [in the other thread] was not written by the Rashba, and there is no reason to splice his words so carefully. The implication of his post was very clearly as LU has described. Even according to your own interpretation, it’s Avak LH at best, and most probably regular LH (or, as LU points out, Motzi Shem Ra).

    As far as the question of how it is permitted to read a LH post in the first place, in my case it happens by accident. I rely on the Mods not to allow LH posts, and for the most part, they do a very good job. If I read LH in a post, I would normally protest. By the time I saw that whole thread, LU and others had done a very good job of this, and there was nothing left to say except, “Look at me! I also don’t like LH!”, so I didn’t get involved.

    in reply to: Unexpected Yichud – humor #1270589

    catch yourself
    Participant

    I don’t think it’s about who is going to snitch on whom.
    The presence of someone who will not get involved in any inappropriate behavior serves as a natural restraint on those who otherwise may have done so.

    in reply to: Unexpected Yichud – humor #1270303

    catch yourself
    Participant

    There is an expectation that nothing inappropriate will be allowed to occur, since the married woman in any case won’t participate.
    This psychological insight provides the basis for much of הלכות יחוד.

    in reply to: Unexpected Yichud – humor #1270240

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Any time there are people present for whom there is not a problem of Yichud, there is no problem for anyone else who is there. Since the brother and sister are allowed to be together, there is no problem for the second man either.

    Mr. Clean is definitely a Parutz. I believe the same is true for Cap’n Crunch. I don’t know about Granny Smith, but it’s a moot point since she’s a woman.
    Gefen and Manischewitz, though, should be ok (as long as they’re both present).

    in reply to: School problem 🏫☹️ #1269082

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Future POTUS, unless I misunderstood, the implication of your post is that the difficulty some schools have in meeting payroll requirements is a result of the growing number of families where the father is “in learning.” The fact is that schools have had this problem since time immemorial, and in fact the problem is getting smaller, both in terms of Rebbeim’s salary, and in terms of Rebbeim actually getting paid. I am happy to note that the (out of town) school in which I am fortunate enough to be a Rebbe has not been late with a single paycheck in at least five years (although the salary is not quite up to par with in town schools).

    Gadolhadorah, Rav Moshe Feinstein was asked this exact question. His ruling was that, in fact, a Rebbe is not precluded from taking a job somewhere else. However, as long as he is not employed elsewhere, he is required to teach even when not getting paid. This is because, since it is prohibited to get paid for teaching Torah, a Rebbe’s salary is classified as “Schar Batalah,” meaning he is getting paid not to take another job. Once otherwise unoccupied, the responsibility to teach devolves naturally upon him. Therefore, a Rebbe is free to take a job elsewhere, but he is not allowed to strike.

    in reply to: Unexpected Yichud – humor #1267545

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Winnie The Poo, I assume you deliberately omitted the George Foreman from the list because he isn’t a כשר.

    I think it’s important to point out that the היתר of בעלה בעיר does not apply in the case of לבו גס בה, which may well include a next door neighbor or a boarder.

    in reply to: jewish communities game #1248390

    catch yourself
    Participant

    New South Wales – Sydney

    in reply to: Bad Friends #1242597

    catch yourself
    Participant

    TLIK – Absolutely true. Depending on your relationship with your child or student (and, of course, their age), there is a limited degree of influence you can have on their choice of friends, or on just about any choice that they will make.

    The objective of Chinuch is not to force specific behaviors, but to implant a value system that will continue to guide your children and students when they are adults. Forcing compliance is generally counterproductive to this goal.

    in reply to: Imagine a World Without Coffee! #1220586

    catch yourself
    Participant

    It’s a sinister mind that could imagine a world without coffee.

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222476

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Seems to me that you didn’t just invoke Godwin’s Law, you fulfilled it.

    Al Gore has a negative carbon footprint. This is not because he doesn’t use any carbon, but because he contributes more carbon to the system than he uses.

    In much the same way, I think Hitler had a net negative worth – whatever value he held for the people who cared about him was negated by, you know, the rest of the story.

    I don’t think this is true for nearly anyone else – certainly not for a person who identifies as an ???? ???. [Please note I did not say ??? ???.]

    In any case, even a Rasha has a role in bringing about K’vod Shamayim.

    ?? ??? ???? ?????? ??? ??? ???? ???

    Hitler had worth in the sense that he was a tool that Hashem used for His purpose.

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222464

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Last Mishna in Horayos, “???? ????? ??? ???? ???? ???? ?? ????.”

    Wolf, you can’t be serious. Every person is infinitely valuable. Every choice you make has the potential to determine the fate of the entire world. Not to mention that, as LU pointed out, you are not worthless but invaluable to your wife, children and friends. To the people whom you hold most dear, your own worth can not be overstated.

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222454

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Of course, there is no one person for whom it is possible to perform all 613 Mitzvos. This question is classic Shabbos Derasha fodder, and has been dealt with by countless Meforshim. Whatever the specific answer, the general idea is that it is possible to be considered as having performed all Mitzvos (and even rewarded as such), including those which can not apply to you.

    In any case, you would make my point even stronger. If even the “Milayim” of K’lal Yisrael fall short of 613, there is no reason at all to infer that the pomegranate has that number of seeds.

    See next post for a completely different theory about the whole pomegranate-Mitzvos connection.

    By the way, Randomex: “Does anyone else remember being taught that Yosef’s dream was of bundles of wheat in a field, with all the bundles bowing to one bundle?”

    This is precisely how the dream is described in the Pesukim (plus the detail that it was Yosef and his brothers who were bundling the grain). I assume I must have misunderstood you.

    in reply to: Children's toy, really? #1220453

    catch yourself
    Participant

    So it sounds like maybe not good parenting, but not in the Chinuch sense.

    in reply to: Adult Shul-friendly Purim Costumes #1221012

    catch yourself
    Participant

    The Halacha is that a person (at least the adults) should wear Shabbos clothing for the reading of the Megillah.

    Otherwise, what LU said.

    in reply to: Children's toy, really? #1220448

    catch yourself
    Participant

    ?? ?????, it should never be used for Chinuch.

    However, that’s not the point of it. Many children enjoy that sort of thing (think, “Shock-Gum”, “Shock Pen” and many other similar toys).

    It’s just something fun to play with, and I’m willing to bet that it is far from accurate as a lie detector.

    in reply to: Friends in different grades #1219568

    catch yourself
    Participant

    WTP, you’re right, I misread the OP.

    I also did not know the context from other threads.

    You’re right on the money.

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222452

    catch yourself
    Participant

    re: Pomegranates

    The actual statement of the Gemara is that “????? ??? ????? ????? ?????,” which means, “The empty ones among you (K’lal Yisrael) are full of Mitzvos like a pomegranate [is full of seeds].”

    I always thought the clear implication is that a pomegranate, while full of seeds, falls short of 613.

    re: Mordechai and Esther

    I love The Purim (urim) Story (ory), but even they were a bit confused on this point. When Esther is about to be abducted by Sir Toe-Face, she calls to “Cousin Mordechai!” Only a few minutes later, in the song, she addresses, “Uncle Mordechai.” Later, when debating whether to go to Achashveirosh, she again sings to “Uncle of mine.”

    There is no source for the idea that Mordechai was Esther’s uncle (which would actually not preclude him from being her cousin as well).

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222448

    catch yourself
    Participant

    29:

    “The chofetz Chaim said you cannot speak l”h about yourself” – (Moderator’s Comment in the OP of the other thread; granted I don’t know which Mod)

    “Moderator :The chofetz Chaim said you cannot speak l”h about yourself

    Wrong.

    My 9th grade rebbi, who was born in 1934 and named after the chofetz Chaim,

    said the chofetz Chaim

    meant that with a touch of humour and as advice

    Dare to find it anywhere in his sefer” – (It Is Time For Truth)

    “I don’t know what works for you in real life, but if you have a halacha or Torah matter to teach me, I am all ears and thrilled to hear it. If you have to end it with a threat, I have to assume you haven’t read the Chofetz Chaim often enough to be relied upon.

    I will look into your tale.” – (Moderator 29)

    It certainly sounds to me that your point was that the established Halacha is that it is Assur to speak LH about yourself, but that you would look into IITFT’s “tale” to the contrary. All I was saying is that, in fact, it is the other way around.

    If I misunderstood, thanks for clarifying.

    Either way, I don’t think “Dare to find it in the Sefer” is a threat, or an offensive way of making a point. I actually think it’s pretty tame by the standard of typical Beis Medrash banter.

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222442

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Moderator 29, the “tale” which needs to be “looked into” is the one about the Chofetz Chaim, and (assuming that it did in fact happen) whether it truly means that it is Assur to speak LH about yourself. As noted above in this thread, I think the story proves that it is Muttar (even if, as was mentioned in the Disagree With The CC thread, it’s not a good idea). If it were really Assur, I have a hard time believing that this, alone among all of Hilchos Lashon Hara, would have slipped the attention of the CC.

    I would have posted this on that thread, but it was closed.

    in reply to: wine for purim #1222269

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Question for the lawyers.

    Is it in fact a violation of the law to serve alcoholic beverages to teenagers in one’s own home?

    in reply to: Friends in different grades #1219565

    catch yourself
    Participant

    It is very possible that your original group of friends is not a bad bunch, but that they feel threatened by your new relationships. The way they are reacting is not the healthiest way of dealing with such a situation, but it is also not beyond the pale of normal behavior for High School age children (I have to assume that Shopping613 is right about the age).

    I do not think you should be burning bridges just yet. Talk it over with your “old” friends. If they are unforgiving or issue an ultimatum (“it’s either us or them”), let them go. You should never allow someone else to control you that way. If they understand, and it seems that they just need to be reassured about their own standing, they are still your friends and you should not leave them.

    Most importantly, I think you should discuss this with an adult who knows the people involved. Maybe a teacher or principal can be helpful in sorting out what’s really going on.

    in reply to: Rachmanis #1218933

    catch yourself
    Participant

    “A rachmanus” is often used to mean “a situation which evokes feelings of pity.” For example, “Beryl is such a rachmanus” would mean that something about Beryl’s personal situation induces one to feel pity towards him.

    in reply to: What's the Point of Having People Like the President Now? #1218459

    catch yourself
    Participant

    The job of the President is to distract everyone’s attention from the person who really runs the country.

    President Trump does this better than any of his predecessors.

    in reply to: Shemona Esrey pronunciation #1217581

    catch yourself
    Participant

    The Amida is referred to by the Mishna as ???? ???? ?????. Most definitely three separate words.

    in reply to: Shemona Esrey pronunciation #1217579

    catch yourself
    Participant

    “Shemonah asar” would mean 18.

    “Aseres” would be 10 connected to the next word, as in “Aseres b’nei Haman.”

    “Shemonah Esrei” is 18 connected to the next word (“Berachos”), which we habitually leave out.

    in reply to: Jewish Music Sometimes Rubs Me the Wrong Way #1216804

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Huju, I’m duly impressed with your musical sophistication. I bow to your cultural superiority. Nevertheless, I must remind you again that comments which denigrate a person or group of people are strictly prohibited by the Halacha.

    Mods…?

    It was originally left because it seemed very non-specific.

    in reply to: Jewish Music Sometimes Rubs Me the Wrong Way #1216801

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Huju, I am not a very musical person, so I can not really comment on the technical quality of the music. I do know that it sounds like music to me, and I enjoy it much better than most classical stuff. I don’t mind if you consider me an uncultured member of the proletariat because of this.

    <edited response to above edit>

    As far as the lyrics, I don’t know to which singers it is that you refer, but the ones I listen to use mostly Pesukim, Ma’amarei Chazal, or Sifrei Kodesh as sources for their lyrics. Those songs which are original lyrics are also quite “Jewish”.

    in reply to: Jewish Music Sometimes Rubs Me the Wrong Way #1216798

    catch yourself
    Participant

    The music with a “Yiddishe taam” about which many peole love to reminisce was also influenced by the popular music of its day. Some of the most “hartzige” tunes actually turn out to have been composed by non-Jews.

    It is not a coincidence that Sefardi music sounds so middle-eastern, and Ashkenazi music sounds so Eastern European. That today’s music sounds so American is par for the course. Don’t be such a fuddy duddy.

    in reply to: Malach Of Cholent #1216339

    catch yourself
    Participant

    It is an absolute Halacha that you need to consume something hot during the daytime on Shabbos. This is a Chiyuv established by the Chachamim to counter the Tzedukim who believed that it is assur to eat hot food on Shabbos day.

    Cholent is not part of our Mesorah.

    It began in times of abject poverty as the cheapest way of fulfilling the Halacha of eating hot food, as well as the Halacha of eating something fleishig (throw in one bone, and everyone gets some beans, barley, and potatoes).

    Currently, cholent holds cultural status as something “we do,” but that’s all it is.

    Maybe it’s obvious to some that this whole thread is a joke; I certainly consider it so. However, the fact is that we should never joke about our Mesorah – it is the single most important part of Judaism.

    in reply to: When did hats get so big? #1216887

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Apparently, the hat malach has been eating too much cholent.

    in reply to: Malach Of Cholent #1216325

    catch yourself
    Participant

    I have little patience for this sort of drivel.

    I must assume that either the source was completely misunderstood, or it was intended as the ????? ???????? before the ?????.

    How did the Malach manage his responsibilities before ??? came along?

    There is no reason to canonize as ???? ????? those trappings of Jewish life which are not actually part of ???? ?????. In fact, this is a dangerous practice, which is liable to cause people to question the entirety of Judaism. [This is beside the point that such statements are often the antithesis of ?? ??? ?????? ??????? ????? ????? ?????.]

    Cholent is a wonderful thing, but let’s not invest it with more importance than it actually has.

    in reply to: Sickness #1215991

    catch yourself
    Participant

    I have to say, I enjoyed the fact that Health started a thread called Sickness.

    in reply to: Words Not to Say to a Rabbi in Shul #1214785

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Tree rubber is certainly not Haeitz, because it is not the fruit of the tree.

    An analogous case might be hearts of palm, which the Gemara states should be Shehakol. It’s been a while, but if I remember correctly, the reason it is not Haadama is that in order to harvest the heart, you need to kill the palm. I don’t know if this is the case with tree rubber.

    [The Poskim have ruled that we should say Haadama on hearts of palm which are sold commercially. This is because nowadays trees are grown specifically to produce the heart of the palm. I’m not sure whether this is true for tree rubber either.]

    Based on this, it would seem that the correct Beracha on the rubber would depend on whether it is analogous to the Gemara’s hearts of palm (in which case it would be Shehakol), or not (then Haadama).

    in reply to: Jewish Music Sometimes Rubs Me the Wrong Way #1216770

    catch yourself
    Participant

    This doesn’t bother me, even when the tune in question is not to my taste.

    What does bother me is when the singer exploits the text, and sings a song simply because one of the words sounds like his name, or similar childish reasons.

    According to the Gemara, in such cases, ????? ????? ?? ??????? ???? ???”?, and this is the source of much suffering. Even ??? ???? was punished for saying ?????? ??? ?? ?????.

    In my opinion, much of the “Goyish-sounding music” about which people love to complain is actually preferable to a lot of the songs these people prefer, if only because their lyrics are not inherently disrespectful of the Torah. It’s better to sing words of your own composition than to abuse the ??? ???.

    in reply to: THE BROKEN TELEPHONE GAME!!! #1227949

    catch yourself
    Participant

    orange

    apple

    pit

    snake

    hiss

    tire

    yawn

    in reply to: What are the manners in Yeshiva between rabbi and student? #1212995

    catch yourself
    Participant

    Joseph:

    [Please note that while the following is written about parents and children, the concept is exactly the same for Rebbeim and Talmidim]

    In nearly all families, a parent can effectively teach Kibbud Av v’Eim in only three ways:

    1. When teaching children to respect the other parent, as described above (One of the many challenges of a single parent home is that the most common way of teaching Kavod U’Moreh Av v’Eim is eliminated),

    2. If it happens to come up in the course of a regular learning seder with the child (as an aside, I have it on good authority that Rav Pam said that most fathers should not learn with their children, and that in fact he did not learn with his own children), or

    3. If possible, by modeling the appropriate behavior. I have had no greater lesson in Kibbud Av than watching my how my mother behaved towards her father for the first 20 years of my life (until he was Niftar). Obviously, this is most effective.

    There may be a handful of parents whose character is so beyond reproach that even their young children will realize that when they say, “You must respect me because I’m your father,” it isn’t really about them. For most people, this is way out of reach.

    Zahavasdad: Please elaborate; I don’t understand the point you are making in the context of this conversation.

Viewing 50 posts - 101 through 150 (of 488 total)