Feif Un

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  • in reply to: The Ten Crommandments #931887

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Thou shalt not post links

    Do not worship Joseph.

    in reply to: spiritually uplifting songs #887920

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Sure, I have an idea. If you enjoy them, then listen to them!

    Oh, did you want recommendations for specific songs?

    Don’t bother with anything put out over the last 10 years. Get some old Shmuel Brazil and Abie Rotenberg albums.

    in reply to: Rav Yisroel Lau will be the guest speaker at the siyum Hashas #887721

    Feif Un
    Participant

    getzel1: Religious Zionists believe that we still need Mashiach. We also believe that having the state of Israel is the beginning stages of our redemption.

    My Rav spoke this past Shabbos about it. He said that even in Israel, we need to remember that we are still in galus.

    in reply to: What to do for dinner when your wife is upstate in the Catskills #970337

    Feif Un
    Participant

    If you’re worried about the cost of buying food, then try this: don’t go to the mountains at all! Stay home! It costs way more to go to the mountains than to buy some food for yourself.

    in reply to: Rav Yisroel Lau will be the guest speaker at the siyum Hashas #887696

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Disagreeing with someone is not sinas chinam. If it was, there would never have been a machlokes!

    Despite their disagreements, many Rabbonim got along just fine, and respected each other. R’ Yoshe Ber Soloveitchik was respected by all the other gedolim of his time. R’ Kook was respected by the Chazon Ish, and he was also R’ Elyashiv’s mesader kiddushin!

    The point is, you can say you disagree with someone in a proper manner, and still respect the person. When you decide to withdraw from a massive event which is supposed to show achdus because you disagree with the hashkafa of someone there, it is wrong.

    I heard that in Israel, there will be many siyumim, one for each group. MO will have one, chareidim will have one, chassidim will have their own, etc. Why? Because they just can’t get along! I think this is terrible.

    R’ Meir Shapiro said that daf yomi was intended to unify the different groups of Jews. Now it’s driving them apart instead.

    in reply to: Rav Yisroel Lau will be the guest speaker at the siyum Hashas #887641

    Feif Un
    Participant

    gavra: When chassidim say they’re going to boycott the siyum because a Zionist will be speaking, it isn’t a show of achdus. It’s very sad, especially during this time of year.

    The Beis Hamikdash was destroyed because of sinas chinam, and these people are preventing it from being rebuilt.

    in reply to: #885866

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Some of you might remember that last year, I had to drink on Tisha B’Av, although I was able to avoid eating. I had an emergency surgery days before, and my Rav told me that at the first sign of weakness, I was required to eat and/or drink.

    I needed water to take my medication during the day, and I was told I must drink it. Luckily, the pain killers knocked me out, and I avoided needing to eat. I did not sit on the floor, though – the Rav said I was considered a choleh, and especially considering that it was a hernia surgery, I was unable to sit on the floor. I sat on a regular bench in the shul.

    It felt weird doing all these things. I know that it was a mitzva for me to do them, but it still felt wrong.

    in reply to: from otd to back on, ask away #885095

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Syag: In the MO community I live in, these things are not considered “extra”. As for asking the shul Rabbi, yes, when I have a question, I ask the Rabbi of my shul. He is extremely knowledgeable, has semicha, and I have no problems asking him.

    Now, does saying these things are not “extra” mean they don’t happen? No. There are women in the community who don’t cover their hair, or wear pants. However, the Rabbi will never say it’s ok, and he encourages people to dress more appropriately – in private, and not via fire and brimstone speeches like most Beis Yaakovs do these days.

    But when it comes to learning, our shul is fantastic! There are shiurim every day, chaburos a few nights per week, and on Shabbos there are numerous shiurim on various topics throughout the entire day.

    Are we Zionist? Yes, and proudly so. In our shul, the gabbai used to make a mi sheberach every week for Gilad Shalit. You should have seen him the first week he didn’t have to say it anymore – he had tears streaming down his cheeks! The love that every member of our shul has for Israel is amazing.

    Our community also has a kollel that is supported by the community. They learn b’chavrusah with many baal habatim every night.

    This is a real MO community.

    in reply to: from otd to back on, ask away #885083

    Feif Un
    Participant

    I was raised chareidi, went off, and became MO when I became frum again.

    Ask away!

    in reply to: IDEA: Let the 100,000 attendees at the Siyum Hashas #884876

    Feif Un
    Participant

    getzel, plenty of people attending the siyum want chareidim to serve in the army.

    As for the 100,000 people, there are far many more people in Israel who want them to serve. Should we get those millions to sign a petition also?

    in reply to: Gedolim #883701

    Feif Un
    Participant

    R’ Gifter zt”l and R’ Dr. Lamm shlita

    in reply to: ~Chicago HEAT~ #883968

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Yahoo weather is showing 96 now in Chicago, with an expected high of 98. Then it’s supposed to start cooling off tomorrow, with it getting to a high of 80 on Sunday. Where did you get 113 from?

    In my part of NJ, they’re saying a high of 104 tomorrow.

    in reply to: What do you think about cannabis becoming more and more legal? #989855

    Feif Un
    Participant

    It only needs a hechsher if it’s prepared. If you’re taking the raw plant, it doesn’t need a hechsher.

    You can’t really overdose on marijuana. Can you have taken “too much”? Of course. It gets you high. Don’t drive, operate machinery, etc. Treat it as if you’ve been drinking.

    Personally, I think it should be legal. It mostly has the same effects as alcohol. I think the government should legalize it and tax it heavily. That gets rid of the dealers, and generates income for the government.

    in reply to: Name That Tune! #1194034

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Yes, thanks, I received it!

    in reply to: BBQ on July 4th?? #963080

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Can we clarify one thing? Grilling and BBQ are not the same thing! When you have a grill with charcoal or propane and you stick on some hot dogs and/or burgers, you are grilling.

    BBQ is when you slow cook something with much lower heat, often with smoke. Flavored wood chips are also often used, as are various rubs and marinades.

    in reply to: Name That Tune! #1194031

    Feif Un
    Participant

    I’ll have to check when I get home today, as I can’t check that email address from work.

    I have posted an anonymous email address of mine here before – look for the thread where I wrote that my employer has openings.

    in reply to: Who Are The Ten People Who Post? #958148

    Feif Un
    Participant

    coffee addict: So which of those user names do I fall under?

    in reply to: Yom Ha’atzmaut 🇮🇱👍👃 #945692

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Csar Joseph HaKatan: If you have an issue with Yom Ha’atzmaut, fine. Don’t celebrate it. But if you feel the need to berate those who do celebrate it, please go and take it up with a few others before doing so here. Please discuss it with the Roshei Yeshiva at Ponovez, and with R’ Ovadia Yosef (who says Hallel without a bracha on Yom Ha’atzmaut). When you’ve convinced them that the day shouldn’t be observed, then come tell us here.

    in reply to: Wedding Intro #881587

    Feif Un
    Participant

    At my wedding, they played For Whom the Bell Tolls by Metallica when we walked in.

    IIRC, at SJSinNYC’s wedding, they played the theme from Transformers when they walked in.

    in reply to: A New King Arose Over Egypt Who Did Not Know Yosef #881285

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Or he’s referring to Csar. I’m pretty sure that’s Joseph’s latest screen name. The mods don’t seem to have recognized him.

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222373

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Ima2many: I saw the study, and it is flawed. He gets his 613 number on a weighted average of his sample size. However, almost 73% of his pomegranates were from the US! You need to represent the actual distribution of pomegranates in the sample size in order to get a real estimate.

    As for a source, I’ve heard the Malbim says a pomegranate has 613 seeds.

    in reply to: ?? ?? ????? ???????? – Missionary problem #883011

    Feif Un
    Participant

    I once pointed out to them that Jews have a lower divorce rate, lower rate of drug use, tend to be well-educated (at least the non-kollel people) and make more money (again, non-kollel people). I asked if that was why they were trying to recruit Jews – to bring their stats up! Then the guy told me that he was born an Orthodox Jew, and his parents are still Orthodox, but he was “saved”. I told him that every night when he goes to bed, he should just think for a minute about how his parents are probably crying themselves to sleep every night over him. Then I told him that he doesn’t need to recruit to improve his stats – he can just return home to his original group!

    in reply to: Garden of Emuna by Rabbi Shalom Arush #880877

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Eichlers sells it on their website. Amazon also sells it, for less than Eichlers.

    in reply to: Calling all Talmidei chachomim – can you help? #880927

    Feif Un
    Participant

    He died al kiddush Hashem. The Jewish community of York had gathered in Clifford’s Tower trying to protect themselves from a mob. The tower was surrounded, and the mob demanded that the Jews convert to Christianity, or they would be tortured to death. R’ Yom Tov paskened that the Jews should kill themselves rather than convert or go through the torture.

    The men in the tower killed their families. R’ Yom Tov then killed the men, then killed himself. The few people who refused were eventually let out of the tower with promises that they would not be harmed, and would be allowed to convert. They were then killed.

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222368

    Feif Un
    Participant

    moskidoodle: When my mother was a teacher, she actually did that with her class! They counted 5 or 6 pomegranates. None of them had 613 seeds.

    in reply to: Inaccurate things we learned as kids #1222338

    Feif Un
    Participant

    I was told that anyone who goes to college is a sheigitz by my 6th grade Rebbe. I went home that night and told both my parents what my Rebbe said about them (I didn’t know about Roshei Yeshivos such as R’ Hutner back then who had gone to college).

    When I was 19, the Rosh Yeshiva of the yeshiva I was in at the time told me that if I left the yeshiva and went to college, I was throwing my life away, and there was no way to stay frum in college.

    It turns out he was partially right on that one. While in school, he actually contacted me to encourage me to leave, saying I was only harming myself. I decided that if I was doomed anyway, I might as well enjoy myself on the way. Only later (while still in college!) did I decide that despite everything I was taught, he was probably wrong. That was when I became frum again.

    Those are a few examples of things I was taught that were wrong.

    in reply to: New YBC Music Video #880279

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Moishy: That’s what it was originally. Nowadays, however, Yerachmiel thinks that people want to hear him sing just as much as the kids. Why does he think that? I have no idea. I started on the BS”D album with a little bit of him singing, and each subsequent album saw him sticking himself in a bit more.

    in reply to: hakaras hatov #880522

    Feif Un
    Participant

    I once heard this in a speech:

    Hakaras Hatov is not about repaying someone for the good they did. Hakarah means recognition – you’re recognizing the good. Why is this the term that is used? Because sometimes, there is no way to repay someone.

    I heard this at a Bonei Olam event, from one of their success stories. He said there was no way he could ever repay Bonei Olam for what they did for him. All he could do was recognize the good. He’d never be able to repay it.

    in reply to: need a sheva broshos speech for tonight..can anyone help?? #880536

    Feif Un
    Participant

    The couple should be mekayem what it says in the Mishna in Avos – al shlosha d’vorim ha’olam omed. The chosson learns, the kallah works, and the parents give gemilas chassadim!

    in reply to: how many times do you dip in at a ???? #880614

    Feif Un
    Participant

    When I was younger I once went to the mikvah on Erev Yom Kippur. There was one guy there who was just sitting in the water. He was a rather large guy, and everyone was waiting for him to get out. Someone asked him to hurry up, and he said, “But it’s so nice and warm in here, it’s like a spa. Can;t you give me a few more minutes?”

    in reply to: Infertility treatments – Tzedaka?? #883843

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Health: yes, relatives come first – in most cases. I happen to have a relative who doesn’t have money. Why? He sits and learns in kollel. His wife doesn’t have a real job (she does things here and there for people to make a few shekels). They’ve contacted us asking for help. We’ve helped them, but also asked if it’s time for him to go out and work (he’s been in kollel for close to 20 years now). He refuses to. His wife has been offered teaching jobs, but she doesn’t want to take them – she feels that she should be a principal, not just a teacher, and accepting a teaching job is beneath her.

    Why should I help them any more? They’re not doing anything to help themselves.

    in reply to: Bnos Yaakov newsletter #879982

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Ohr Chodesh: There was a story a few years ago about a mechanech who contacted R’ Shteinman about some former students who were threatening him over the way he had treated them. This was the response:

    We see that R’ Shteinman holds that the methods of chinuch needed have changed. Fire and brimstone is not the way to go!

    in reply to: Coconut chicken soup #1016962

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Sam2: Why? People use non-dairy creamer all the time as a substitute for milk.

    in reply to: Bnos Yaakov newsletter #879944

    Feif Un
    Participant

    The head of Camp Sdei Chemed wrote another story in response to this letter – a story that shows the proper way to educate young girls, and make them WANT to keep mitzvos because they choose to, not because they’re scared:

    This girl was one of the sweetest and well-behaved girls you can find and so of course all we could think about throughout the summer was why would she not have wanted to dress according to proper modesty guidelines. Something just didn’t seem right.

    The riddle was explained on the last night of camp, when during the banquet the girls open their hearts and tell us the private journeys of their lives. This is understandably an emotional time, but her story left everyone teary eyed. It goes back to the time just after her bas mitzvah. During a summer break she got into a major accident where she almost lost her life. Happy to be alive, in the hospital she was told she might not have use of her legs anymore. As she sat in the hospital bed and visitors came by, she promised Hashem that she would do whatever He wants if he would give her the use of her legs again. That she would use them only for doing good things and nothing else. At this point you could just imagine how strange it was to us that it was this very girl who was unwilling to dress modestly. That’s because of what happened next.

    She took back the promise that night and said she will once again put a long skirt on because she believed she has grown up and moved on. She said that this decision was the hardest one to make, but the new counselors and rabbis she met during the summer in Sdei Chemed showed her that there is another kind of Judaism that exists. One of love and kindness.

    in reply to: Best & Worst Grade School Memories #977558

    Feif Un
    Participant

    My worst memory is when a “Rebbe” in the yeshiva accused me of talking during class. I wasn’t talking, and I denied it. He threw me out of class until I was ready to “tell the truth”.

    He didn’t let me back in for a few days, because I wouldn’t admit to talking. The menahel asked me, “Why don’t you just say you did it so you can get back into class?” I asked him why he felt it was ok to lie, and he said he’d speak to the Rebbe.

    It turned out that after class the day I was thrown out, the boy sitting next to me went to the “Rebbe” and admitted that he had been talking, not me. So why was I outside? Because I told the Rebbe I hadn’t been talking, and he felt that was chutzpa, to contradict him in front of the class.

    At least that was what he told the menahel. It doesn’t explain why he asked me each morning, “Are you ready to tell the truth yet?”

    My best memory is graduating, knowing I was finally finished with the school and wouldn’t have to go back there.

    in reply to: Song Lyrics #1155188

    Feif Un
    Participant

    happiest, if it’s the one I’m thinking of, you can find it on the Modzitz website – modzitz.org Click the link on top for the music. It says the following story about it:

    Although he was centered in Otvoczk, Rebbe Shaul Yedidya Elazar of Modzitz had Chassidim throughout the major towns and cities of Poland. One of these was Reb Azriel David Fastag, who became noted for his exceptional voice throughout Warsaw. Many came to the shul where Reb Azriel David and his brothers, who were also blessed with lovely voices, would daven on the Yamim Noraim [High Holy Days]. Reb Azriel David was the ba’al tefilla [led the prayers], while his brothers accompanied him as a choir. His crisp, clear and moving voice had a profound effect on all who heard him.

    He lived simply, supporting himself from a small dry goods [clothing] store, but his happiness and fulfillment came of another source – the world of Negina. His moving tunes made their way to Otvoczk, where his Rebbe, R. Shaul Yedidya Elazar appreciated them immensely. The day a new niggun of R. Azriel David’s came to the Rebbe was like a “Yom Tov” for him. [One of his most memorable compositions is “M’heira Yishama,” a wedding tune.]

    Dark clouds began to cover the skies of Europe – the clouds of Nazism. In spite of the terrible decrees, the yellow patch and the ghettoes, most Jews could not fathom what was about to befall them. Only a few “read the map” correctly and managed to escape the clutches of the Nazi occupation to safe havens. One of them was the Modzitzer Rebbe, Rebbe Shaul Yedidya Elazar, whose Chassidim made a tremendous effort to save him. As the Nazis entered Poland, the Chassidim smuggled him out of Poland to Vilna [Lithuania], and from there he made his way across Russia to Shanghai, China, eventually arriving in America in 1941.

    Meanwhile in Poland, tens of thousands of Jews were being ‘shipped off’ daily to their death in cattle cars that were part of the railway system. Aroused from their warm beds in Warsaw, husbands were separated from their wives, children from their parents. The elderly were often shot on the spot in front of their loved ones. Then the Jews were gathered and sent off in these trains to a place where their existence would no longer trouble those dregs of humanity known as the Nazis – to Auschwitz, Treblinka, Majdanek, etc. What did it look like in one of those cattle cars of the “death train”?

    What could one expect to find other than people in their death throes – gasping, sighing and crying? One could hear the stifled cries of children, crushed together and trampled upon by the spiked boots of the evil, cruel Nazis.

    However, in one such car, it seemed like a “tone” of life managed to emerge from these crushed people. What – people on their way to the slaughter, singing??? Is this not some cruel Nazi joke? Let us look a bit closer…

    An elderly Jew, wrapped up in his ragged clothing, his face white as snow, makes his way over to his neighbor on the death train, begging him to remind him of the niggun the Modzitzer Rebbe sang on Yom Kippur for the Avoda, to “Ma’areh Kohen.”

    “Now – now – all you want to know about is niggunim?” answered the other, with a hard look at the Chassid, thinking that maybe all the suffering had caused him to lose his mind.

    But this Modzitzer Chassid, Reb Azriel David Fastag, was no longer paying attention to his friend, or to anyone else on the train. In his mind, he was at the Amud HaTefilla [prayer stand] next to the Modzitzer Rebbe, and it is he who was the baal tefilla before all the Chassidim.

    Suddenly, before his eyes, the words of the twelfth [of thirteen] Principle of Jewish Faith appeared: “Ani Ma’amin b’Emuna Sheleima, b’vias HaMoshiach; v’af al pi she’yismamaya, im kol zeh, achakeh lo b’chol yom she’yavo – I believe with perfect faith in the coming of the Moshiach; and even though he may tarry, nevertheless, I wait each day for his coming.” Closing his eyes, he meditated on these words and thought, “Just now, when everything seems lost, is a Jew’s faith put to the test.”

    It was not long before he began to hum a quiet tune to these words. Amidst the heavy atmosphere of death and despair on the train, Reb Azriel David’s dveykus [attachment to Hashem] took him above it all.

    “How can one of us be singing at such a time?” wondered his fellow Jews on the train. And with such a sweet voice! It must be, that from Heaven they are accompanying us, in mourning, to our death… But listen, what is it that they are singing? You’re about to be slaughtered, shot, poisoned or burnt and what are they singing? — I believe!!!”

    The Modzitzer Chassid was completely above it all, a pillar of song, bringing out of his bloodied lungs the song of his life — the song of the eternity of the Jewish People. He was unaware of the silence in the cattle car, and of the hundreds of ears listening attentively in amazement. He also didn’t hear the voices as they gradually joined his song, at first quietly, but soon – growing louder and louder! Meanwhile, he made sure to write out the notes of the newly composed song…

    The moving tune, with its holy words, had penetrated the hearts of the Jews on the train, and had joined to the pure emuna [faith] in their hearts, which burst out from them in the form of this great song. The song spread from car to car. Every mouth that could draw a breath from those congested cattle cars, filled with live “corpses” and pungent with the odor of people crowded together, joined in a piece of “Ani Ma’amin – I believe.” It became a wonderful, amazing symphony unto itself.

    An elderly Jew, close to his death, asked for an explanation. His neighbor screamed to him, “We’re singing the Jewish People lives – chai – lives! You too, sing with us – the Jewish People lives, Ani Ma’amin!” Closing his eyes, the elderly Jew clenched his fists and sang with his remaining strength – “the Jewish People is alive, I believe that Moshiach Tzidkeinu [the Righteous] will come quickly,” and expired.

    As the train neared the death camp, the railway workers wondered: from where is this amazing song coming? Could the Jews be singing their own burial service tune?

    As if waking from a dream, Reb Azriel David opened his eyes to the sight of the singing train. His eyes were red from crying; his cheeks, wet with tears. Deeply moved, he yelled to whomever would listen, “My dear brothers! This niggun is the song of the Jewish soul. It is a song of pure faith, for which thousands of years of exile and troubles cannot overcome!”

    Then, in a choked voice, he continued, “I will give my portion in Olam Haba [the World to Come] to whomever can take these notes of my song ‘Ani Ma’amin’ to the Modzitzer Rebbe!”

    A hushed silence descended upon the train. Reb Azriel David lifted himself up by the ends of his thumbs, searching through the crowd that surrounded him. Two young men appeared, promising to bring the notes to the Modzitzer Rebbe, at any cost. One of them climbed upon the other, and in the small crack of the train’s roof that only he knew of, made a hole from which to escape. Poking his head out under the open sky, he said, “I see the blue Heavens above us, the stars are twinkling and the moon, with a fatherly face, is looking at me.”

    “And what do you hear?” asked his companion.

    Turning white, the young man answered, “I hear the Ministering Angels singing the Ani Ma’amin tune, and it’s ascending to the seven firmaments of Heaven…”

    Bidding farewell to their brothers and sisters on the train, the two proceeded to jump off, one after the other. One was killed instantly from the fall, while the other survived, taking the notes of the song with him. He eventually found his way to Eretz Yisrael [perhaps to the Rebbe’s son, the Imrei Aish, who was in Tel-Aviv], and the notes were sent by mail to Rebbe Shaul Yedidya Elazar in New York.

    Upon receiving the notes and having the “Ani Ma’amin” niggun sung, the Rebbe said, “When they sang ‘Ani Ma’amin’ on the death train, the pillars of the world were shaking. Hashem said, ‘Can it be that My Torah is a fraud? No! But whenever the Jews will sing ‘Ani Ma’amin’, I will remember the six million victims and have mercy on the rest of My People.'”

    It is told that on the first Yom Kippur that the Rebbe sang the “Ani Ma’amin,” there were thousands of Jews in the shul. The entire Kahal [congregation] burst into tears, which fell like water into the pool of tears and blood of the Jewish Nation. The tune soon spread throughout Klal Yisrael [world Jewry].

    “With this niggun,” said Rebbe Shaul Yedidya Elazar, “the Jewish People went to the gas chambers. And with this niggun, the Jews will march to greet Moshiach.”

    in reply to: Rock musician gives mussar! #880005

    Feif Un
    Participant

    nishtdayngesheft: Because people think that chassidim are supposed to be on a higher standard.

    zahavasdad: Yes, I know. A friend of mine was in yeshiva with him. He has a song about Israel, another about the Holocaust, and he’s also spoken very strongly about Holocaust related issues, such as people collecting Nazi memorabilia and Holocaust deniers. It must be the Jewish spark inside him!

    in reply to: Does anyone have any brilliant ideas? #879446

    Feif Un
    Participant

    You can make a sign! With a lot of exclamation points! Just like your post! Have it say the following! “Davening is a time for talking – to Hashem! Have your conversation! Just do it with the proper partner!”

    in reply to: Over 70% of Orthodox Jews are Chareidim #1098102

    Feif Un
    Participant

    I didn’t read through this thread when it started, but am reading it now. There was a big mistake earlier. It was stated that if women would have been allowed at the asifa, the crowd would have doubled. This is not true. If women were allowed, the chassidim would not have come, and the stadium would have been half empty. Over 2/3 of the crowd was chassidish.

    Also, it said add 25% for kids under 19. I saw pictures of chassidish kids well under 19 coming to the asifa.

    in reply to: PRENUPTUALS in FRUM circles??! #879344

    Feif Un
    Participant

    PBA: Tomche said the women would get money no matter what, whether she listened to Beis Din or not. I was simply refuting his claim.

    As for forcing her to take the get, you’re correct. In such a case, I assume they would use a heter meiah rabbonim for the man, and the woman would be unable to remarry. That is not an agunah case.

    in reply to: PRENUPTUALS in FRUM circles??! #879341

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Tomche, it says the following:

    However, this support obligation shall terminate if Wife-to-Be refuses to appear upon due notice before the Beth Din of America or in the event that Wife-to-Be fails to abide by the decision or recommendation of the Beth Din of America.

    in reply to: PRENUPTUALS in FRUM circles??! #879330

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Tomche: except if the Beis Din decides that a get isn’t warranted. If she drops her claim, then fine – no payments need to be made. If she doesn’t, then she forfeits her right to the money, as is outlined in the document.

    in reply to: PRENUPTUALS in FRUM circles??! #879320

    Feif Un
    Participant

    R’ Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zt”l had a teshuva on the topic of shmita and heter mechira. The question was if someone held of the heter had a guest who didn’t hold the heter worked, was it a problem for the guest to eat the food? He says that as long as the host has a good posek to rely on, it is fine for anyone to eat at his home.

    You may remember that a while back, I had a thread about kashering a dishwasher. When I asked the Rav in the area I moved to about it (after I’d gotten the heter about kashering it from the Rav in my previous hometown), he quoted this teshuva and said anyone could eat at my home.

    I believe the same teshuva would apply to this situation. R’ Schachter and R’ Willig are definitely people we could rely on.

    in reply to: It's Time! #879087

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Making your way through the internet takes everything you’ve got.

    Taking a break from all your worries, sure would help a lot.

    Wouldn’t you like to get away?

    Sometimes you want to go

    Where no one knows your real name,

    but they’re always glad you came.

    You wanna be where you can see,

    our troubles are all the same

    You wanna be where everybody knows

    Your screen name.

    You wanna go where people know,

    people are all the same,

    You wanna go where everybody knows

    your screen name.

    in reply to: OU kashrus is not reliable? #1214248

    Feif Un
    Participant

    PBA: You use Facebook? But it’s 100% assur! At the asifa they never said Facebook is ok! Do you know what kind of shmutz can be found there? Don’t you know that dozens of marriages were broken up by Facebook? [/sarcasm]

    in reply to: PRENUPTUALS in FRUM circles??! #879283

    Feif Un
    Participant

    nishtdayngesheft: True, at the time the psak was not on IVF. However, later on, when IVF came around, the Satmar Rebbe at the time ruled that R’ Yoel’s reasoning extended to IVF as well.

    A friend of mine who went through IVF told me that he was once at a small event from A TIME. They had a speaker from Satmar there, and he got up and said IVF is assur, and children from it are safek mamzeirim. It did not go over too well!

    in reply to: The Tisha B'Av Parade #1026800

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Avraham and Yitzchak will be there to greet us.

    Yaakov and his sons will stand by and smile.

    Moshe Rabbeinu will lead us once again.

    in reply to: hat for shabbos #879170

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Be prepared for disappointment as you realize that you don’t feel any holier with it on.

    in reply to: PRENUPTUALS in FRUM circles??! #879274

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Naysberg: Did you ever hear of the organization Bonei Olam? Do you have any idea how many children are born through fertility treatments every year?

    Did you know that the Satmar Rav held IVF was 100% assur, and that children that result from it might be mamzeirim?

    in reply to: PRENUPTUALS in FRUM circles??! #879268

    Feif Un
    Participant

    Naysberg: And Gedolim in the US (such as R’ Schachter) paskened that such a get is fine, and encourage use of the halachic prenup.

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