Nechomah

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  • in reply to: Changing a Topic to Another Forum #1819141

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Really what difference does it make what topic it is in? People generally look in decaffeinated coffee.

    in reply to: good fast food place in jerusalem? #1819149

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Well, I don’t know about you, but maybe they want a change once in a while. Do you think that chareidi bochurim sit 24/7 in b”m?

    in reply to: kosher Hotels in Yerushalaim #1819139

    Nechomah
    Participant

    What does that mean – 8 to 10 minute walk to Alda HaChardis? Is that a restaurant? Do you mean Aida HaChareidis? That is not a restaurant, that is a kashrus organization. Litov is nice, also partially a beit hachalamah for new mothers. Does have its own kitchen, but Geulah and Meah Shearim are within walking distance. Nicer restaurants are also not far.

    in reply to: good fast food place in jerusalem? #1816961

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I find it a bit odd that it says the last post on this thread was less than 2 hours ago, but the last post’s date is back in February.

    But anyway, just to note, hechsherim in EY are not like in US. There are the big 3 or 4 good hechsherim that are all over the country – Badatz Eidah HaChareidis, Shearis Yisroel, Badatz (Rav) Landau, and Rubin. None of the Rabbanut hechsherim are very good if you consider yourself part of the yeshiva velt. no clue why anyone would recommend a yeshiva boy to go to Ben Yehuda area, full of pritzus. Like walking around in Time Square. As far as needing updating of a list, that’s not really necessary, as the hechsher must be clearly posted close to the entrance of the restaurant. Just check it out. Anywhere in Geulah has pizza, including Uri’s pizza, or falafel, Shlomo Falafel, or a few other ones down on Malchei Yisroel. I did hear a while back about an organization that is trying to work with restaurants and other food providers to see whether, even though they don’t have the top hechsherim (likely due to cost), they might still be a place where certain things can be eaten. I don’t have details about this, but can ask around the yeshiva areas to see if the Americans know of such a thing.

    As far as a specific recommendation, I would say that at the Rav Shefa mall, there are a good few places, primarily Big Bite, where there is one very good restaurant with pizza and pastas, salad, toast, and also falafel all available in one location, and other places next door or a bit away that have fleishigs, including burgers. There used to be a fish place over there as well, but I’m not sure it still exists.

    Happy eating!!!

    in reply to: I realized my mistake, did you realize yours? #1809074

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Joe – Of course you are supposed to try to correct it, if you realize your mistake, but it is not in order to TELL something to HKB”H. But if you are sincerely trying to connect and somehow the word is a difficult one for your lips and tongue and teeth to pronounce exactly, I don’t believe you will be punished for it. I think the seforim hakedoshim that you are referring to are speaking to the people who are on the level to say these words without difficulty and are nonetheless not pronouncing the proper words.

    Are you of the opinion that a English-speaking (or whatever other language) BT should never attempt to daven or bentsch in loshon hakodesh because he might mispronounce words?

    in reply to: I’m engaged! ✨🥂💕 #1809073

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Hey that’s wonderful. Mazel Tov. It should be a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel. When is the chassanah? Would love to just show up.

    in reply to: I realized my mistake, did you realize yours? #1808885

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Joseph do you really think that HKB”H really NEEDS our words, correct or not? No way. We are the ones who NEED to say the words. The good faith effort is what develops the connection, which is the whole purpose of tefillah. Now that he realized his mistake, paying attention and fixing it will only enhance the relationship even more, causing all previous errors in the tefillah to be fixed retroactively.

    in reply to: Does Admor = Rabbi? #1801766

    Nechomah
    Participant

    A Rabbi, as in LOR, is someone who you call to ask about halachic issues – Shabbos, kashrus, etc.

    An Admor is a person who is a spiritual advisor. I would say that someone who has grown up in the house where his father was the older generation’s advisor is in the best position to be able to lead the next generation.

    in reply to: Why doesn’t the coffee room accurately reflect last update #1791204

    Nechomah
    Participant

    My problem is that if you look at the main CR screen with the list of the threads, it is not changing. Perhaps the times of posts are changing, but that screen is not updating. On the right side of YWN pages where it shows the latest in the CR, there are different threads listed there. Why aren’t they the same anymore?

    in reply to: Best New Top Loading Washing Machine (Washer) #1789802

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Just to answer Rif, I live in EY, so my 90 is Celsius not Farenheit.

    But as Lightbrite points out, in the OP it says a top-loading machine, not front-loading.

    in reply to: Which One is Outrageous?! 🖱️💰🖱️💰 #1789714

    Nechomah
    Participant

    What was the point of arresting her for a 100 shekel fine for crossing not in a crosswalk? Is this an arrest-able crime?

    in reply to: Best New Top Loading Washing Machine (Washer) #1789675

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Miele is an extremely expensive brand. Even if it is super special, not many yeshivish people I know in Yerushalayim area can afford such a machine – it is twice the price of the Bosch machine that I bought a couple of years ago. But seriously, who wants to cook their clothes? I can wash at 90 degrees in my machine also.

    in reply to: height in shidduchim #1788552

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I don’t agree with what rational says that you need serious psychotherapy, but I do highly recommend going for a few visits to see if you can figure out what your wife’s height represents to you and why it makes you feel inferior in some way. If all else is good in your marriage, then having thoughts of divorce is not proper. For sure they’re not healthy.

    in reply to: Best New Top Loading Washing Machine (Washer) #1785366

    Nechomah
    Participant

    TH, just a point about why washing machines in Israel take 2 hours whereas the machines in US take 15-20 minutes for a load.

    In US you hook your washing machine up to the cold AND hot water spouts, so you automatically get hot water to your desire. The machines in Israel have to heat up their water. They are only hooked to one spout.

    I have also found that the newer machines in the past several years are having short cycles. Not everybody wants to wash things for so long, as it can wear out the fabric too quickly. Also if i realize that I need something quickly for the next morning or later in the afternoon, I can pop it in for a short cycle and it’s clean! I don’t recommend these quick cycles for really dirty clothes, but for many things it’s great when you’re in a rush, which many Jewish mothers seem to have a problem with.

    I am actually wondering if I have a mold problem in my water drainage pipe. I brought my washing machine to my new apartment several years back and always noticed a smell. I can’t remember if the clothes also smelled, but that is a distinct possibility. About two years ago I had to buy a new machine and I STILL smell that smell, now not so much on the clothes, but the smell is still there. It can’t be mold in the machine because it was there straight away after I bought the machine.

    Any ideas? I would love to get rid of that smell.

    BTW, as far as bleach into washing machines, I was told by the technician who came to hook up my new machine that the newer machines are built less strong than they used to be built and there is a risk to damaging the pipes/tubes when putting bleach in the machine.

    in reply to: Gehenim!🔥 #1778442

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Please clarify something for me. I was under the impression, possibly mistaken, that gehinnom is for Jewish neshomas. The Gan Eden that Yidden go to is different than where the non-Jews go. The necessity to purify the neshoma of a non-Jew, particularly one who did horrible things to the Jews, like Hitler, ym”sh, is totally not clear to me. He is not going to Gan Eden or anywhere close to that, so where does he go?

    in reply to: Why do some Americans not eat the OU hechsher in E”Y? #1770903

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I am confused. On what products or restaurants does the OU give a hechsher in EY? My understanding was that it was an American organization and the products that are brought to EY get a stamp from Israeli Rabbanut in addition.

    in reply to: Can a husband bring down his wife (take her farther from Hashem)? #1765935

    Nechomah
    Participant

    NB, just for the record, I do not believe that I said above that “a woman should not encourage her husband to make minyan/learn”. I merely said that she should not “tell” him that it’s time for minyan, time for his chavrusa, oh he missed davening shacharis, etc. These would be along the lines of Syag’s grumbling comments. And this was not advice given by a kallah teacher to a girl before she gets married, but once married there are changes in the dynamics of the marriage and the woman is not her husband’s keeper. I hope I made myself clearer.

    in reply to: Can a husband bring down his wife (take her farther from Hashem)? #1765331

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I think you have to be careful how you define a “Rav”. A lot of people have thoughts on Torah subjects, but you must know from whom you are getting your information.

    A woman is not responsible for her husband’s mitzvah observance, not the positives or the negatives, unless she is serving him something with bugs in it, but then he is onus (did it without wanting to) and she is at fault.

    A marital advisor I heard speak said that the wife is not supposed to get involved with what minyan her husband goes to (or whether he goes to minyan at all), whether he sits and learns, etc. All she can do is daven that he want to do the mitzvahs and come closer to Hashem. She can create an environment of wanting to grow and going to learn, showing a desire to change, but she is not responsible for him. As stated above, a person is only responsible for him/herself, no one else.

    This is one of the reasons why it is very important for a person in shidduchim to make sure that the person they are dating has similar values of growth and general mitzvah observance as they do. It is not so easy to change these things after marriage.

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1744336

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Just to make a point, when Joseph says it is a “Yiddishe” event with an “e”, he is using Yiddish to describe it as being a Jewish event, not an event that is supposed to be in Yiddish.

    Of course the major event in NYC should have only small amounts of Yiddish, but why can there not be multiple events for people who speak different languages? I know that here in Yerushalayim, there was an event for the English-speaking population. They had different events on different days. Each to his own.

    in reply to: “Eretz” Yisroel = Frummer? #1741833

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Thinking Out Loud, that was a really beautiful explanation of your connection to EY.

    in reply to: Self checkout #1741259

    Nechomah
    Participant

    In EY the newest thing in the big supermarkets, like Osher Ad, Shaarei Revacha and Yeish, are the handheld barcode scanners. Basically you get a cart that has a scanner holder next to the bar to push the cart, and as you go through the store you take your items, scan them with your scanner, and when you’re finished you put the information from your scanner into a checkout computer, pay, and go home. Bagging is up to you. Some people bag it all at the end, but a very smart woman I saw had the large heavy duty shopping bags all open in her cart, and as she scanned her items, she put them straight into the bags, making her job super fast at the end.

    Now I have one issue, in Osher Ad, there is one catch. You have to take your cart to a special station and weigh it when you’re finished. There is a bar code on the cart, which records the weight of the empty cart, and the difference is the weight of the products you purchased. I imagine that this is their way of trying to prevent people from taking things that they did not scan (hopefully unintentionally), but I found that due to the fact that there is only one of these scales (maybe 2) in the whole giant store, the line for this process is longer than the lines for having a regular clerk ring up your order. This defeats the whole purpose of using the scanner. I also found it a little insulting that they seem to be not willing to trust that people are honest and will scan everything they put into their carts. Oh well, I just did not use a scanner when I shopped in that store, but everywhere else, I’m happy to use them when they’re available as they simply save a lot of time.

    in reply to: Grinding meat with a stand mixer attachment #1740266

    Nechomah
    Participant

    From what I’ve seen, the attachment is a totally separate device, does not require the use of the mixer bowl or the device that mixes dough for break or cake or anything similar. It seems that it is just the engine of the mixer that is being used to turn the grinding device in the meat grinder. If this is all true, then I see no reason why the entire mixer itself would become fleishig, as it has absolutely no contact with meat.

    in reply to: Hechsherim in Israel #1736606

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I would be interested to know who says that a product with a Rabbanut hechsher on it is makpid on yoshon. As far as I have always know, only Badatz and possibly the mehadrin hechsherim like Shearis and Rubin, are makpid to give their hechsher only on a yoshon product.

    Products that are yoshon in chutz la’aretz have a notation about that status near the hechsher. There is a Rav Herman, who was recently niftar, who created a whole guide on products and when they would become chodosh, investigating thousands of products to find out their status and putting out a guide for those interested parties, free of charge.

    A Rabbanut of Israel stamp on a product produced in chutz la’aretz has no more assurance of its chodosh/yoshon status than the original hechsher. A prime example would be granola bars from Nature Valley sold here in EY. You would have to refer to the chodosh guide to find out when those products began using chodosh products in order to know whether they are still yoshon.

    If anybody has conflicting information on what I have written, please advise.

    in reply to: WARNING : Shemita wines being sold in NY/NJ #1724839

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I got a similar psak as anIsraeliyid regarding keeping wine. I received a bottle of heter mechirah wine many years back and our Rav told us that we cannot spill it and must keep it, basically as a yerusha for our children. It is on a shelf in my closet.

    in reply to: Sports #1724838

    Nechomah
    Participant

    GHD, just a word of caution about tennis and seniors. Make sure you are not overweight and try to play doubles rather than singles. The pressure and jarring on your knees from running back and forth on the court can aggravate or even cause arthritis, and even in hips. If you feel pain in these joints, sit down, rest, put some ice, take an anti-inflammatory and see if it goes away. If it does not, then tennis may not be a good sport for you. Better to try cycling, swimming, or rowing, as these are sports that do not involve impact-loading and are kinder to your weightbearing joints.

    in reply to: WARNING : Shemita wines being sold in NY/NJ #1723828

    Nechomah
    Participant

    You also have to decide if you would rely on the heter mechirah under which some of those grapes were harvested by Jews during shmittah. That is a huge shaila to ask your LOR. The question of how much you can pay for these wines, Otzar Beis Din as well, can come into play.

    Thank you for bringing up this important issue. Kedushas shviis is part of the fruit/vegetable regardless of where you are.

    in reply to: Not tzinius for no reason #1713147

    Nechomah
    Participant

    mannequin

    in reply to: why does wearing a white shirt make you more frum in the yeshivish world #1684307

    Nechomah
    Participant

    ZD – I think either you need to wear a big or learn to eat over your plate. I don’t know too many grown men who have such problems keeping their shirts clean. My sons certainly don’t.


    Nechomah
    Participant

    I believe that Mitsykins said it best and most accurately. This is the primary reason that I’ve always heard.

    in reply to: I want hot water! To drink! #1667388

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I’ve had two different kinds of electric kettles (known as a koomkoom here in EY). One has the place for the plug to insert right into the body of the kettle. The second has a separate piece that plugs into the wall, so there is only a small piece that attaches the heating element to the place that provides the electricity. I prefer this second type, but I have toiveled all types, waited a full week, preferably with the lid off so it can thoroughly dry.

    in reply to: THREAD: Not for Anti-vaxxers #1625713

    Nechomah
    Participant

    My question right now is why is it the measles vaccine that has everybody up in arms (I vaccinated all of my children as close to the schedules that existed at the time and added what I felt to be necessary ones out of pocket). It used to be that one could get the vaccine for mumps and rubella separately and nobody seemed to be against getting those vaccines, apparently because of the potentially dangerous consequences of getting sick with those illness. There was actually an outbreak of mumps in EY back around 10 years ago and I was petrified when my vaccinated son, who was 10 at the time, got sick. I was so worried about the sterility issues, which I knew nothing about, but B”H, was told he was too young for it to be an issue. but what if he had been a couple of years older or an early developer? Rubella is almost not heard of and nobody is running to try to get exposed to that illness, particularly not women in their first trimester from what I understand. And what about polio? The fear that people experienced when polio was going around was immense. Are anti-vaxxers against these vaccines as well? I still remember getting the small pox vaccine when I was a kid. Nobody has heard of that illness any more. We live in a different time from when these illnesses were rampant and there was no protection available. I wonder what they would do if they lived back then or when vaccines were just becoming available.

    in reply to: Lessons From The Amish Measles epidemic of 2014 #1623564

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Haimy, so does that mean you leave your not-yet school-age children unvaccinated, running the risk of bringing the disease into your house? I hope there is no one in your home who is at risk due to low-immunity, a newborn, etc. Why not just vaccinate them in accordance with the recommended time for the vaccinations or at least at somewhat of a delay if you are concerned about the young age they are started? I know that in the gan where my daughter works, all the 3yo girls were being brought in to the local clinic to receive their second dose of the MMR vaccine in this latest outbreak. That means that these girls had already received their first dose about two years ago and now they are receiving their second, which means they are basically protected for life. Waiting until school age leaves your child at risk during those years.

    in reply to: why were reshaim created? #1614227

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I just had a thought I wanted to throw out to the oilem.

    Reshaim presumably do not only do aveiros, but may also in fact do some mitzvos. I would think that HKB”H may be creating these people for the mitzvos they will do, so that He can give them reward, and hopes that they will do teshuva for their aveiros and stop doing them.

    in reply to: Halachos of the three weeks #1553806

    Nechomah
    Participant

    JB2 – Halachos of the 3 weeks are different than those of the 9 days. During the 3 weeks (until Rosh Chodesh Av), you can sew and fix things, so you can take your pants to a tailor.

    But, if they are your only pants, my question would be what will you wear while he is fixing them?

    in reply to: Define #1543741

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Sheefis would probably be your desires/ambitions – שאיפות

    Not sure what the second would be, but veiss means to know, so some conjugation associated with that.

    in reply to: what does “bandanot” mean? #1526080

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I don’t know what you heard, but I think that the connotation is that it depends on where the bandana sits on the head. A lot of the younger women do not pay enough attention and it slips down and exposes hair above the forehead and unless they are very careful, behind the ears the hair can also be exposed. I don’t think that there is a concept that someone who covers their hair with a shaitel is more shtark than someone who wears a different type of hair covering, but it depends on how careful the person who wears it is. A shaitel does have the advantage of covering places completely, like behind the ears, etc., so there are no concerns about that area. I think that if some women realized how much of their hair was showing when they wear various head coverings, they might regret going around with so much showing. I know I would.

    in reply to: Dual Citizen #1524106

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Just a side note to the comment about getting benefits when making aliya. It is not true that all people who make aliya get benefits. if you live in the country for too long (like the children born in Israel to non-Israeli citizens who make aliya later on in life) are not entitled to most of the benefit package that you get when making aliya. Contact an aliya specialist (like Nefesh B’Nefesh) before making plans based on assuming you will be getting benefits.

    in reply to: First date ideas in Jerusalem #1521172

    Nechomah
    Participant

    People usually save going to the Kosel for when they have closed the shidduch, to give thanks to HKB”H for finding their zivug. Not a place I would suggest going on a first date, or even second or third, for that reason.

    in reply to: chedarim in Ramot and givat zeev? #1517575

    Nechomah
    Participant

    What you’re asking for is an oxymoron, there is no chareidi cheder worth its salt that would dream to eventually lead to bagrut. Please clarify what you’re looking for, or bagrut or chareidi.

    in reply to: The Embassy is really opening up in Jerusalem? #1516413

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Just a note, if you search on the State Department’s website for embassy and consulates and you ask for it to show you what is in Israel, only the Tel Aviv location comes up. They have a separate line a few rows later for Jerusalem.

    in reply to: Capitalone 360 ATM dollar withdrawals in Jerusalem? #1507121

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Thanks GH, but it’s been less than a year since Bank Leumi stopped giving dollars at their machines. Euros is not an issue, but of no help.

    in reply to: Capitalone 360 ATM dollar withdrawals in Jerusalem? #1506604

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Toi, can you be more specific? Is it a particular machine at that location? It used to be that Bank Leumi machines would allow withdrawals in US dollars, but that stopped at least 6 months ago, and we have not found any machines that permit withdrawals in dollars anywhere in EY at this point. If you know of something, please let me know.

    in reply to: Badatz Beit YosefIsrael #1483125

    Nechomah
    Participant

    My husband told me at one point that it’s not so much an issue of the schechita itself, where the Sefardi schochtim may be terrific and machmir on every chumra, both of the Ashkenazim and Sefardim, but something in the kashering process is different relative to when or how the salting is done. Can anyone fill in my blanks?

    in reply to: Calling 972 from Israel #1478998

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Usually 972 numbers are written like this 97225123456 or 972533121212. The way you dial when you are in EY is like this. Drop the 972, like was said above, and add a 0 at the beginning. In my examples, the first is to a number in Yerushalayim, so it will look like this 02-5123456. 02 is the city code for Yerushalayim. The second example is a cell phone number and it will look like this 053-3121212. Make sense?

    in reply to: Trief Recipe #1473420

    Nechomah
    Participant

    LB – Can you explain your question? “What’s the difference between the Wolf’s question and a woman asking if she can wear a shell under a sleeveless dress (that besides lacking sleeves is otherwise tznius)?”

    No one suggests to wear the sleeveless shell alone, so I don’t get what you’re asking?

    Wolf, in answer to your question, I do not think there is a “din” regarding this. Some extremely cautious people who are suspicious of everything they do in life might not want to use recipes with treif ingredients in them and convert them to kosher, but the average Yid would probably not have an issue with this. I just made a wonderful beef/broccoli/vegetable dish this past erev Shabbos that originally called for bison steak in the recipe.

    I mean, really, if a recipe is by a goy and they call for beef, are you obligated to use treif meat in that recipe? I doubt it, so I just extrapolate and use whatever kosher meat or chicken I feel is appropriate in a recipe. I do, however, have a hard time looking at various seafood recipes and pictures showing that food, but I think that is just a personal thing.

    Bon Appetite!!!

    in reply to: Big Brim Vs. Small Brim! #1470511

    Nechomah
    Participant

    My husband told me that R’ Aaron Kotler wore two kippas all the time, a smaller one underneath a larger one. That’s what he has been doing for years now.

    in reply to: when to tell parents that you are expecting #1470254

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I asked our Rov when to tell our parents when I was expecting my first. He said right away, to give them some nachas. I agree about not wanting them to be worried about fertility issues (can totally understand DaMoshe also). When my daughter was not coping well with the nausea is when she and her husband told me (on strict secrecy from anybody else).

    in reply to: Just Read, plz #1458066

    Nechomah
    Participant

    Fingernail, I hope I am wrong, but you sound like you are in much pain. If I am not wrong, then I wish I could do more to help ease that pain, but the only thing I can do is find someone to whom you can talk (probably a professional) and who can help guide you through your pain to reconnect to the people around you so that you can step into the light and enjoy living.

    in reply to: Yisroel or Yisrael #1454259

    Nechomah
    Participant

    In EY, Ashkenazi pronunciation of the kamatz is more of an Oh or sound, not oi like a cholom. The patach is what has the Ah sound. It does not matter if it is for the name of a person or the place (EY).

    The Sefardim have no significant difference in the pronunciation of the patach and the kamatz, both sound like an Ah.

    In America, many people pronounce these vowels like Sefardim.

    in reply to: I’m Back!! (A Shtikl) #1454258

    Nechomah
    Participant

    WB Toi, what prompted this very welcome visit by a veteran CR member?

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