Nechomah

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  • in reply to: Paskez Chew chews and other extinct nosh photos #2123768
    Nechomah
    Participant

    try searching for Paskesz on the site collectingcandy.com

    in reply to: Help with my literacy please #2123766
    Nechomah
    Participant

    You might type your comments in a program such as Microsoft Word, where there is the option for spell and grammar check while you are typing. Look at the suggestions and changes that need to be made and once they are done then copy/paste the comment into the webpage. (Also make sure to use paragraphs in addition to punctuation.)

    in reply to: looking for an apartment to rent in israel #2101127
    Nechomah
    Participant

    You obviously don’t know Givat Ze’ev. In the “new” area – 12 years old is still considered new – there are a lot of English-speaking people, probably 1/3 of the area, plus there is a whole Belz community, so plenty of chassidim. Don’t rule it out.

    in reply to: Israeli Parenting style vs the US. #2099756
    Nechomah
    Participant

    @common saychel

    “when you were 12/13/14 were you hitchhiking all over the country taking hitches with know drug dealers and molesters? disappearing for a week at a time and no one knew where you were? parading around in hostile areas where people were ready to kill you?”

    I’m curious where you read this about the boy?

    in reply to: 🦠😷Raise Your Hand if You’re in Quarantine!😷🦠 #2047986
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Me!! Me!!

    Got my positive on Friday. I promptly gave it to my son and my daughter :(.

    I’ll be done on Sunday.

    in reply to: The Bochur found out he is not Jewush… #2042108
    Nechomah
    Participant

    It doesn’t say that his parents “recently” made aliyah. It says in the original Hebrew article that it was a number of years ago. That could be 10 or 15 years, or longer, and if this bochur is of marriageable age, that may mean he might have been around 7 years old when they came. Somehow he was put into the chareidi chinuch system and just moved on, whether or not his parents were of the same mind. How he reconciled the differences in the way his parents lived to the lives of his friends and rabbeim is a question.

    My question is not whether he is going to forget what he has been learning these last years in yeshiva, but whether after this major upheaval in his life he will be the same person emotionally. That can have a tremendous effect on his ability to continue learning at the level he was prior to this whole event. Who knows what his life will look like in 10 years.

    in reply to: Non jewish isreilis #2039424
    Nechomah
    Participant

    But what does it mean “sincerity”. In my understanding, it is sincerity in keeping the mitzvos.

    in reply to: Non jewish isreilis #2039130
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I’m sorry, but I wasn’t aware that simply being willing to defend the Jewish state is grounds for being considered a member of the Jewish people. I thought that one had to be willing to keep the mitzvos that Hashem gave to His people. These Russians who are maybe 1/8 Jewish come here, and perhaps they go into the army if they’re young enough, or their children do, and they get a nice salary while there plus plenty of benefits afterwards, and then they go and vote for the political parties that are out to destroy mitzvah observance in Israel. I’m not really sure they should be called Jewish.

    in reply to: Should Lace Shaitels be Allowed? #2035793
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Yehudis, you’re probably right, but who will they get to pay for those precious locks????? Since Daddy already has to supply Mommy with a new one each year or so as styles change, will he start providing them for his daughters as well?

    in reply to: Israels cost of living crisis #2030562
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Yes, there are people who unfortunately really struggle, especially in the winter, but there are many people who do not experience the problems that you report. I live in a new, modern building with my own heating run on gas and electricity. I do not find my apartment cold enough to require it. There are many old buildings in Meah Shearim and older parts of Jerusalem and probably Bnei Brak, and in those buildings there may be little heat or heat for the entire building and I’m sure those families really feel the cold. Clothing in Israel is too expensive in general. I just don’t think you can extrapolate this to “most” Israelis because I don’t think that’s right. Yes, more than half of the children in this country (say Chareidi children) live under the poverty level, but I wouldn’t say that most Israelis experience the issues you report. I know families whose parents managed to buy them apartments before the value of real estate went up, so even though they don’t have large incomes, they don’t have to pay rent or mortgage, so that is a huge savings for them. Please make sure to contribute to those wonderful tzedaka organizations as I am sure there are plenty of people who need that type of help, but, again, don’t envision that everybody is out there paying 5K a month for rent or mortgage, as it’s not really the case.

    in reply to: Israels cost of living crisis #2027916
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Romain – I don’t know if you’ve made a trial visit to Israel, but in Afula and Haifa there are definitely shuls and mikvaos. People have to learn how to live without restaurants on every block. There are pizza and falafel places all over Israel with decent kashrus. Please check your information before stating incorrect things as fact. I can also tell you that dati moshavim have shuls. There are many places outside of the three cities that you mentioned where people can live for less money than you stated previously. Don’t forget about Modi’in Illit, which is good for yeshivish people. Prices there are lower than other places.

    in reply to: NYC Chol HaMoed Trip Warning #2010214
    Nechomah
    Participant

    As far as needed multiple booster to maintain immunity, do you take the flu shot yearly? We have to do that because there are different strains (also read as variants) of the flu virus that are assumed to be prevalent in the coming year. Maybe in another 20 years (hopefully sooner), if corona hasn’t died out by then, doctors, scientists, and researchers will understand enough about the virus and its variants to provide a yearly booster aimed at the most prevalent variant at that time. For now we’re behind the 8 ball, trying to play catch up to a disease that seems to always be 2 steps ahead of us.

    Also, do you know how many doses of vaccine for DTaP are given to infants in order to provide some level of immunity? Check it out. And even after that there are further boosters given in childhood/adolescence, and still a person needs a tetanus booster shot every 10 years to maintain immunity. Does that mean it is not effective?

    in reply to: Pushback on Ben and Jerrys #2001329
    Nechomah
    Participant

    GH – What products would you recommend? I don’t seem to be able to find any wonderful frozen yogurt products here. Most of what is available is just plain vanilla, chocolate chip, or punch ice cream, no interesting flavors. And as far as I know, B&J is CY in EY. I could hop over to the store to make sure, but I don’t think it is from cholov stam here.

    in reply to: 1984 warning becoming reality 2021 #1997226
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I would like to make one amendment to the following statement:

    “Deblasio announced you need to be vaccinated in order to participate in society starting next month.”
    Got it so no freedoms taken away. Except the freedom not to be vaccinated, but I am not really familiar with this freedom.

    I think the freedom that is being taken away is the freedom to willingly infect people with a potentially deadly or, in many cases, debilitating illness, which shows a high level of disregard for human life IMO. Living in a society does not give you the “right” to do whatever you like. Society has the right to make rules for people to live in it. If you don’t like the rules, go live in a different society.

    COVID is a new illness and not much was known about it in the beginning. Not what symptoms it caused, not what treatments would work, and also not what could help prevent it. As more research and experience has been developed over the last year and one-half, more is known about all of these various issues and the responsible health professionals are able to say with more certainty what symptoms are caused, what treatments work, and what can help prevent it. But because we are so afraid to deprive people of their “rights”, so the professionals are reluctant to make mandates, but rather make strong suggestions. In the beginning it wasn’t clear if these suggestions would really work, but they couldn’t just stand around doing nothing. Some type of effort to fight the disease was necessary. It has only come through trial and error and experiment. So sorry to those of you offended by your loss of rights as being part of the potential errors that have been made along the way. But if you don’t like the society’s rules, go live on an uninhabited island.

    in reply to: Women Shouldn’t Be Expected To Work #1996604
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I don’t think that this is the type of decision where one side or the other can unilaterally decide things. This is something that has to be discussed by both spouses and probably even ask daas Torah if there are two very divergent viewpoints.

    in reply to: Leave of Absence #1996466
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Refuah Shleimah

    in reply to: Any coupon for Mishpacha magazine subscription? #1988874
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I don’t know what a subscription costs if you live “in town”, but I live in Israel and my subscription costs OVER $300, so I don’t know how it costs you less but you still need a coupon. You should sign up for a 2-year subscription and get one of their presents that they offer.

    in reply to: Is English the new Yiddish? #1982764
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Re Der Emes –

    The newspaper cannot be used as any proof of spelling in Yiddish. The newspaper was a Soviet paper, not a Jewish paper, and the word Emes is a word in Loshon HaKodesh, so no need to change the spelling for Yiddish. The fact that the Soviets did not connect Yiddish to the Torah, they needed to spell the word phonetically. But the real way to spell that would be exactly as philosopher said דער אמת.

    in reply to: Scooter Explosion #1977173
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Honestly Syag, I almost always agree with your posts, but in this case I want to say that I have a problem with yeshiva “boys” – emphasis on boy – riding anything motorized on the streets in any city of the world. Do the boys understand the laws of the road? Are they wearing a helmet? What are the rules and do they follow them? I know that here in EY, a person from age 16 can ride an electric bike or electric scooter after passing the theory portion of the driver’s test. He is considered a motor vehicle, not a simple bicycle or skateboard. That means that he has to understand the laws of the road and what he is or is not allowed to do. Riding on the sidewalk is not generally safe because of pedestrians that cannot get out of the way in time. I’ve seen boys criss-crossing from one side of the street to the other, going on the side walk and using a crosswalk, but I don’t know too many cars that can stop in time for a moving vehicle that suddenly darts out from the opposite side of the street and crosses in front. Helmets are a must! I don’t know what to tell these boys to do with their hats, especially if they’re going for davening or yeshiva, but they will provide little protection in the event of an accident. This is an issue that has bothered me for a long time and I live in a relatively quiet neighborhood but with a growing young population and parents may not be aware of the laws, but there are basics that need to be followed for the safety of all.

    in reply to: Shidduch references #1971495
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Why would it matter how much you checked into the person as far as the issue of getting to know them naturally? This is part of your OP.

    People who are a reference will either have the time or not in order to answer questions and the person asking can get a feel whether it is inconvenient due to COVID or the person’s reluctance to answer questions about the single in question. COVID did not patur anybody from getting married and most people would be willing to help in that matter, so your latest point still is not relevant. Once the single finds out that those references are not valid, they should replace them with something appropriate. People who know how to ask questions will follow whatever trail is available for them to follow and many people do not even use the actual references very much, preferring instead to find out information from independent sources.

    in reply to: Is English the new Yiddish? #1965166
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Avi K
    Where was your grandmother from? It sounds a lot like my father, who grew up in Rhodes, where he knew Turkish, Greek, and Italian because the island was at various times governed by those various governments, depending on who won the most recent war, plus Ladino.

    in reply to: Dressing up for Yom Tov #1962498
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I think it probably depends on the cost of the item in question.

    in reply to: Dressing up for Yom Tov #1962356
    Nechomah
    Participant

    What is the special bracha for women who are dressing up? Anybody who buys a new garment of sufficient value is supposed to say a shecheyanu on it. Dressing up on YT is part of simchas YT. According to one drasha I heard, kedusha of Shabbos comes from HKB”H, but the kedusha of YT comes from Klal Yisroel, and one way to give it kedusha is to dress up in special clothes.

    in reply to: Father-in-law at Aufruf #1962355
    Nechomah
    Participant

    AAQ – A lot of times a “younger” sister could actually be married before the “older” brother who is the chosson and would like to come to her brother’s chassanah with her husband. The problem is is that the Israeli government does not let anybody who is not Israeli to freely come in and out of the country. Even someone who has lived in Israel for over 20 years but does not hold Israeli citizenship cannot return to his or her home simply because he or she is not Israeli. It has taken organizations, such as Chaim V’Chessed many tireless hours of work to get them to allow students who have been duly vaccinated in this country to be able to return should they dare leave the borders. I am not even referring to tourists and the like. But there are even other situations, such as my son who left for America for an extended visit with my family before vaccines were available and was not allowed to come back home for Pesach, even if he had been willing to sit in quarantine for the required two weeks.

    in reply to: Rav Tzvi Kaplan Yeshiva #1947401
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I don’t really know how to explain knapsacks, as it is probably something you would have to see and be in the environment to understand. They are generally used when going on tiyulim like to the beach or hiking, and if that is what a bochur is doing, then fine. But to go to the BM, not really. No, Wolf, it does not mean that you are a goy (if that is what you were thinking I am intimating) if you take your things to your chavrusashaft in a knapsack (or similar or even “worse” social offenses). Here in EY, I see that there are more socially accepted (at least in my opinion) ways of dressing depending on what circles you travel in. It is not this way in America in the least, so you probably can’t relate to what I’m saying.

    in reply to: Rav Tzvi Kaplan Yeshiva #1947268
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Regarding the summer, the yeshiva follows the traditional yeshiva schedule, where the “summer zman” is from Rosh Chodesh Iyyar until Tisha B’Av. There are 3 weeks off for bein hazmanim, and then back to the shtender for Elul Zman on Rosh Chodesh Elul.

    A knapsack is like a soft backpack. No, it is not appropriate for a bochur learning by R’ Tzvi to be going around with a knapsack. Find a different way to schlep your things or leave them in your apartment.

    in reply to: Don’t we ever learn from our mistakes? #1924671
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Re what Goldilocks said about parents knowing all the details about a trip a child is taking, this is 100% true, and in many cases the parents DO know that the child is traveling and even arranged it for them, but there are people who are stationed in the airport to find likely people who will take an extra suitcase for them to the destination and it will be picked up straight away at the airport, and the kid gets paid a hefty sum for this. They are lied to about what is inside the suitcase and have no clue that it is something illegal in the country they are traveling to. The biggest problem is that there is no law in Israel to punish people from attempting to export this product, which is not illegal is Israel. The kid figures why not, I’m hardly doing anything and getting paid a lot. Because of their naivete, they do not suspect something criminal behind such a setup and fall into the trap as customs and police officials at their destination have their eyes pealed looking for such people. Parents have to make it completely clear to the child that they are not allowed to take anything from anybody in the airport to bring with them to their destination. Unfortunately, if the parents did not make this type of trip themselves, they forget this critical detail.

    in reply to: H-a-s-h-e-m H-e-l-p M-e F-i-n-d A S-h-i-d-d-u-c-h-!-! #1887575
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Here is for opinionated-2

    February 19, 2014 8:54 pm at 8:54 pm
    #1224216
    postsemgirl
    Member

    Hey everyone. I’m a kallah!

    in reply to: Changing a Topic to Another Forum #1819141
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Really what difference does it make what topic it is in? People generally look in decaffeinated coffee.

    in reply to: good fast food place in jerusalem? #1819149
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Well, I don’t know about you, but maybe they want a change once in a while. Do you think that chareidi bochurim sit 24/7 in b”m?

    in reply to: kosher Hotels in Yerushalaim #1819139
    Nechomah
    Participant

    What does that mean – 8 to 10 minute walk to Alda HaChardis? Is that a restaurant? Do you mean Aida HaChareidis? That is not a restaurant, that is a kashrus organization. Litov is nice, also partially a beit hachalamah for new mothers. Does have its own kitchen, but Geulah and Meah Shearim are within walking distance. Nicer restaurants are also not far.

    in reply to: good fast food place in jerusalem? #1816961
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I find it a bit odd that it says the last post on this thread was less than 2 hours ago, but the last post’s date is back in February.

    But anyway, just to note, hechsherim in EY are not like in US. There are the big 3 or 4 good hechsherim that are all over the country – Badatz Eidah HaChareidis, Shearis Yisroel, Badatz (Rav) Landau, and Rubin. None of the Rabbanut hechsherim are very good if you consider yourself part of the yeshiva velt. no clue why anyone would recommend a yeshiva boy to go to Ben Yehuda area, full of pritzus. Like walking around in Time Square. As far as needing updating of a list, that’s not really necessary, as the hechsher must be clearly posted close to the entrance of the restaurant. Just check it out. Anywhere in Geulah has pizza, including Uri’s pizza, or falafel, Shlomo Falafel, or a few other ones down on Malchei Yisroel. I did hear a while back about an organization that is trying to work with restaurants and other food providers to see whether, even though they don’t have the top hechsherim (likely due to cost), they might still be a place where certain things can be eaten. I don’t have details about this, but can ask around the yeshiva areas to see if the Americans know of such a thing.

    As far as a specific recommendation, I would say that at the Rav Shefa mall, there are a good few places, primarily Big Bite, where there is one very good restaurant with pizza and pastas, salad, toast, and also falafel all available in one location, and other places next door or a bit away that have fleishigs, including burgers. There used to be a fish place over there as well, but I’m not sure it still exists.

    Happy eating!!!

    in reply to: I realized my mistake, did you realize yours? #1809074
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Joe – Of course you are supposed to try to correct it, if you realize your mistake, but it is not in order to TELL something to HKB”H. But if you are sincerely trying to connect and somehow the word is a difficult one for your lips and tongue and teeth to pronounce exactly, I don’t believe you will be punished for it. I think the seforim hakedoshim that you are referring to are speaking to the people who are on the level to say these words without difficulty and are nonetheless not pronouncing the proper words.

    Are you of the opinion that a English-speaking (or whatever other language) BT should never attempt to daven or bentsch in loshon hakodesh because he might mispronounce words?

    in reply to: I’m engaged! ✨🥂💕 #1809073
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Hey that’s wonderful. Mazel Tov. It should be a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel. When is the chassanah? Would love to just show up.

    in reply to: I realized my mistake, did you realize yours? #1808885
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Joseph do you really think that HKB”H really NEEDS our words, correct or not? No way. We are the ones who NEED to say the words. The good faith effort is what develops the connection, which is the whole purpose of tefillah. Now that he realized his mistake, paying attention and fixing it will only enhance the relationship even more, causing all previous errors in the tefillah to be fixed retroactively.

    in reply to: Does Admor = Rabbi? #1801766
    Nechomah
    Participant

    A Rabbi, as in LOR, is someone who you call to ask about halachic issues – Shabbos, kashrus, etc.

    An Admor is a person who is a spiritual advisor. I would say that someone who has grown up in the house where his father was the older generation’s advisor is in the best position to be able to lead the next generation.

    in reply to: Why doesn’t the coffee room accurately reflect last update #1791204
    Nechomah
    Participant

    My problem is that if you look at the main CR screen with the list of the threads, it is not changing. Perhaps the times of posts are changing, but that screen is not updating. On the right side of YWN pages where it shows the latest in the CR, there are different threads listed there. Why aren’t they the same anymore?

    in reply to: Best New Top Loading Washing Machine (Washer) #1789802
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Just to answer Rif, I live in EY, so my 90 is Celsius not Farenheit.

    But as Lightbrite points out, in the OP it says a top-loading machine, not front-loading.

    in reply to: Which One is Outrageous?! 🖱️💰🖱️💰 #1789714
    Nechomah
    Participant

    What was the point of arresting her for a 100 shekel fine for crossing not in a crosswalk? Is this an arrest-able crime?

    in reply to: Best New Top Loading Washing Machine (Washer) #1789675
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Miele is an extremely expensive brand. Even if it is super special, not many yeshivish people I know in Yerushalayim area can afford such a machine – it is twice the price of the Bosch machine that I bought a couple of years ago. But seriously, who wants to cook their clothes? I can wash at 90 degrees in my machine also.

    in reply to: height in shidduchim #1788552
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I don’t agree with what rational says that you need serious psychotherapy, but I do highly recommend going for a few visits to see if you can figure out what your wife’s height represents to you and why it makes you feel inferior in some way. If all else is good in your marriage, then having thoughts of divorce is not proper. For sure they’re not healthy.

    in reply to: Best New Top Loading Washing Machine (Washer) #1785366
    Nechomah
    Participant

    TH, just a point about why washing machines in Israel take 2 hours whereas the machines in US take 15-20 minutes for a load.

    In US you hook your washing machine up to the cold AND hot water spouts, so you automatically get hot water to your desire. The machines in Israel have to heat up their water. They are only hooked to one spout.

    I have also found that the newer machines in the past several years are having short cycles. Not everybody wants to wash things for so long, as it can wear out the fabric too quickly. Also if i realize that I need something quickly for the next morning or later in the afternoon, I can pop it in for a short cycle and it’s clean! I don’t recommend these quick cycles for really dirty clothes, but for many things it’s great when you’re in a rush, which many Jewish mothers seem to have a problem with.

    I am actually wondering if I have a mold problem in my water drainage pipe. I brought my washing machine to my new apartment several years back and always noticed a smell. I can’t remember if the clothes also smelled, but that is a distinct possibility. About two years ago I had to buy a new machine and I STILL smell that smell, now not so much on the clothes, but the smell is still there. It can’t be mold in the machine because it was there straight away after I bought the machine.

    Any ideas? I would love to get rid of that smell.

    BTW, as far as bleach into washing machines, I was told by the technician who came to hook up my new machine that the newer machines are built less strong than they used to be built and there is a risk to damaging the pipes/tubes when putting bleach in the machine.

    in reply to: Gehenim!🔥 #1778442
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Please clarify something for me. I was under the impression, possibly mistaken, that gehinnom is for Jewish neshomas. The Gan Eden that Yidden go to is different than where the non-Jews go. The necessity to purify the neshoma of a non-Jew, particularly one who did horrible things to the Jews, like Hitler, ym”sh, is totally not clear to me. He is not going to Gan Eden or anywhere close to that, so where does he go?

    in reply to: Why do some Americans not eat the OU hechsher in E”Y? #1770903
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I am confused. On what products or restaurants does the OU give a hechsher in EY? My understanding was that it was an American organization and the products that are brought to EY get a stamp from Israeli Rabbanut in addition.

    in reply to: Can a husband bring down his wife (take her farther from Hashem)? #1765935
    Nechomah
    Participant

    NB, just for the record, I do not believe that I said above that “a woman should not encourage her husband to make minyan/learn”. I merely said that she should not “tell” him that it’s time for minyan, time for his chavrusa, oh he missed davening shacharis, etc. These would be along the lines of Syag’s grumbling comments. And this was not advice given by a kallah teacher to a girl before she gets married, but once married there are changes in the dynamics of the marriage and the woman is not her husband’s keeper. I hope I made myself clearer.

    in reply to: Can a husband bring down his wife (take her farther from Hashem)? #1765331
    Nechomah
    Participant

    I think you have to be careful how you define a “Rav”. A lot of people have thoughts on Torah subjects, but you must know from whom you are getting your information.

    A woman is not responsible for her husband’s mitzvah observance, not the positives or the negatives, unless she is serving him something with bugs in it, but then he is onus (did it without wanting to) and she is at fault.

    A marital advisor I heard speak said that the wife is not supposed to get involved with what minyan her husband goes to (or whether he goes to minyan at all), whether he sits and learns, etc. All she can do is daven that he want to do the mitzvahs and come closer to Hashem. She can create an environment of wanting to grow and going to learn, showing a desire to change, but she is not responsible for him. As stated above, a person is only responsible for him/herself, no one else.

    This is one of the reasons why it is very important for a person in shidduchim to make sure that the person they are dating has similar values of growth and general mitzvah observance as they do. It is not so easy to change these things after marriage.

    in reply to: Yiddish at Siyum hashas #1744336
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Just to make a point, when Joseph says it is a “Yiddishe” event with an “e”, he is using Yiddish to describe it as being a Jewish event, not an event that is supposed to be in Yiddish.

    Of course the major event in NYC should have only small amounts of Yiddish, but why can there not be multiple events for people who speak different languages? I know that here in Yerushalayim, there was an event for the English-speaking population. They had different events on different days. Each to his own.

    in reply to: “Eretz” Yisroel = Frummer? #1741833
    Nechomah
    Participant

    Thinking Out Loud, that was a really beautiful explanation of your connection to EY.

    in reply to: Self checkout #1741259
    Nechomah
    Participant

    In EY the newest thing in the big supermarkets, like Osher Ad, Shaarei Revacha and Yeish, are the handheld barcode scanners. Basically you get a cart that has a scanner holder next to the bar to push the cart, and as you go through the store you take your items, scan them with your scanner, and when you’re finished you put the information from your scanner into a checkout computer, pay, and go home. Bagging is up to you. Some people bag it all at the end, but a very smart woman I saw had the large heavy duty shopping bags all open in her cart, and as she scanned her items, she put them straight into the bags, making her job super fast at the end.

    Now I have one issue, in Osher Ad, there is one catch. You have to take your cart to a special station and weigh it when you’re finished. There is a bar code on the cart, which records the weight of the empty cart, and the difference is the weight of the products you purchased. I imagine that this is their way of trying to prevent people from taking things that they did not scan (hopefully unintentionally), but I found that due to the fact that there is only one of these scales (maybe 2) in the whole giant store, the line for this process is longer than the lines for having a regular clerk ring up your order. This defeats the whole purpose of using the scanner. I also found it a little insulting that they seem to be not willing to trust that people are honest and will scan everything they put into their carts. Oh well, I just did not use a scanner when I shopped in that store, but everywhere else, I’m happy to use them when they’re available as they simply save a lot of time.

    in reply to: Grinding meat with a stand mixer attachment #1740266
    Nechomah
    Participant

    From what I’ve seen, the attachment is a totally separate device, does not require the use of the mixer bowl or the device that mixes dough for break or cake or anything similar. It seems that it is just the engine of the mixer that is being used to turn the grinding device in the meat grinder. If this is all true, then I see no reason why the entire mixer itself would become fleishig, as it has absolutely no contact with meat.

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