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  • in reply to: Abortions for Goyim #1904091
    rational
    Participant

    When an abortion is permitted, the Tzitz Eliezer recommended it be done by a female Jew. According to his shitah, abortion by a Jewish physician is assur m’drabonon, but by a non-Jew it is assur mid’oraysa. For a female physician the d’rabonons are less severe, and so that would be the preferable method.

    in reply to: Americans at Mercaz HaRav #1904089
    rational
    Participant

    There is no American program, and hence no Americans. I define that as a bochur who lives in Chutz la’aretz and is spending a year or two in Israel. If one comes on Aliyah, he is an Israeli, accent and all. Everything is in Hebrew, as it should be. If a bochur can carry on a basic conversation in Hebrew, he has a chance to succeed. If not, try a different yeshiva.
    Hashkafically, a talmid will be much happier if he agrees with the yeshiva’s hashkafah, but that is not a requirement. Many excellent yeshivas have talmidim who are yotzei dofen.

    in reply to: Rosh Hashanah Contradictory #1900269
    rational
    Participant

    “By us the minhag is to wear the kitel on Rosh Hashanah”
    Who is “us”?
    By us, the minhag is not to wear a kitel Rosh Hashanah. We wear it only on Yom Kippur.

    in reply to: Tzitzis on Shabbos #1897822
    rational
    Participant

    Having one string above another is not a situation of entanglement. That’s what happens when people have a poor understanding of English.
    From the Oxford dictionary online: Entangle:to cause something to become caught in something such as a net or ropes”. Here, the tzitzit are not caught in anything.

    Separately, I’ll take Nomesorah’s wise words a bit further. Equating all d’rabonons is wrong and dangerous.

    in reply to: Jacob Blake #1896149
    rational
    Participant

    Most of the people here are engaging in wishful thinking in accordance with their political view. Considering that no one knows (and probably never will) what actually occurred, the speed of judgement here is astounding. I find it even stranger due to the almost complete lack of trust in the media that is usually expressed in this forum. Yet here almost everyone is cocksure of what happened, with advice, judgments and political predictions, all based on the media.
    How so?

    in reply to: Get accepted into Brisk #1894439
    rational
    Participant

    I can corroborate NoMesorah’s words. The boys of the Brisker yeshivas are almost all bright and serious. The fact that these yeshivas specialize in Kodshim is cute, but these boys spend plenty of time learning other sedarim. Occasionally, one gets in because of money or yichus, but no system is perfect. Are they worth more on the market? What a horrible thought. What market? Never heard of such a thing…

    in reply to: Get accepted into Brisk #1894438
    rational
    Participant

    Dear Syag,
    Oh, you need not believe my true story at all. But to proclaim disbelief and give it equal weight to a first-hand account is absurd and quite indefensible.
    Was it an islolated incident? I don’t know, but if you believe the attitude is unheard of, then you are not connected. I have many relatives and friends in Lakewood and I can assure you none were surprised at the story, even though to their credit they were most saddened by it. Is it the norm? Of course not. Most peole have neither that much money nor a first-class masmid son to allow for the two sides of the story.

    By the way, this once-bochur was also offered a young woman with off-the-charts yichus. This was also rejected as the boy’s parents were not interested in being owned and micro-managed by the meyuchas royal family.
    He ended up marrying a wonderful bas yisrael with neither money nor yichus and they have been living a life of Torah and Yiras Shamayim in Israel, with love and respect for all. Even for the Zionist uncle who davens in a blue shirt sans hat. Threw that in because I knew you would understand the expression, what with your college education and all.

    in reply to: Get accepted into Brisk #1892345
    rational
    Participant

    Hello Syag
    I guess when a fact doesn’t fit one’s world view, it is deemed false. How convenient.
    It’s a true story and it occurred in February 2006, a minute’s ride off Route 9 in New Jersey.

    in reply to: The black hat. #1892343
    rational
    Participant

    A mesorah for a black hat in any situation is a poor joke.
    Fabricating a mesorah leads to questioning authentic mesorot.

    in reply to: Returning to Lakewood Elul Z’man – Covid update #1892344
    rational
    Participant

    Thank you moderator for editing. I understand context. The use is unacceptable, no exceptions. Read some history books on it, maybe you’ll be convinced.

    in reply to: Get accepted into Brisk #1892069
    rational
    Participant

    I have a nephew who learned in Brisk for a few years. When the masmid’s name was put out on the market, a wealthy man came unannounced to his home and asked to speak to the father. The gvir pulled out a checkbook and said, “I have a daughter. I want your son. Just name the amount “.

    I place the blame on the wealthy who covet the kavod, and not on the boys who truly learn lishmah.
    By the way, the father threw the guy out.

    in reply to: Returning to Lakewood Elul Z’man – Covid update #1892068
    rational
    Participant

    ymribiat:

    How dare you mention Mengele yimach shemo in this conversation. Think before you write, and never ever compare a comment you disagree with to Nazi behavior. In Israel you could be sued for what you wrote.

    in reply to: TAG #1891702
    rational
    Participant

    “Does anyone know of a company/organization similar to Tag in Lakewood?”

    Does anyone know of a company/organization in Lakewood that is similar to TAG?
    A little knowledge of English goes a long way in preventing misunderstandings.

    in reply to: Returning to Lakewood Elul Z’man – Covid update #1891189
    rational
    Participant

    תורה מגנא ומצלא

    in reply to: Get accepted into Brisk #1891028
    rational
    Participant

    “It makes little difference if its the uncle or the nephew, the second cousin or the wannabee, entrance to Brisk has always been considered the coveted spot.”

    Please explain this sentence, I don’t understand it. To whom does it make little difference, and who covets the spot? The uncle? the second cousin?

    in reply to: How did the Poskim deal with the Spanish Flu? #1890297
    rational
    Participant

    I think your question was answered.
    How did contemporary Poskim rule on the same issues that we have been dealing with these days, I.E. closing yeshivas and shuls, outdoor minyanim, Etc…

    Answer: They didn’t. And if they did, we don’t know about it.

    in reply to: How did the Poskim deal with the Spanish Flu? #1889308
    rational
    Participant

    I think you are overestimating the spiritual and technological reach of the gedolim you mentioned. World-wide acceptance of the Mishna Brurah and the Aruch hashulchan was attained way after this period. The Chazon Ish was a young man of 39-40 and had not yet attained global recognition. The Spanish flu was unlikely to have been addressed by these gedolim as a psak applicable to all, but rather a local recommendation that remained local, and was not necessarily recorded for posterity.

    A better example may be the cholera epidemic of 1849 and the famous psak and actions of Rav Yisroel Salanter. But even that was a local psak and was not binding or meant for all of klal yisrael. The details of that episode are a subject of debate until today, and it only played out on a local level.

    On that note, important public controversies that relied on mail and transportation usually played out over a period of years and not weeks or months. Today these things are instantaneous, then they were not.

    rational
    Participant

    Incorrect. It absolutely cheapens the concept, the expression was even put in quotation marks. The point emphasized (that’s what quotation marks are for) was that it’s not only that the RY is an anav, but that he has reached the peak of anavah, the tip of the blade of modesty, the “shpitz” itself. Sorry, that’s yeshivishe trash talk. You may talk like that often, but it makes a poor impression on others. Telling others to chill out is yeshivishly cool, but a Rebbe should choose his words carefully. And please use apostrophes.
    Maybe commonsaychel isn’t so off the mark.

    rational
    Participant

    “shpitz anava”? As in והאיש משה ענו שפיץ מכל האדם אשר על פני האדמה ?
    Why take the holy concept of anava and turn it into cheap yeshivishe hock?

    rational
    Participant

    I’m about as critical of yeshivas as can be, but I found nothing in the above description that is gaivadik. Good yeshiva, serious learning, not for beginners, good for them, even kudos. Elitist, maybe, so are all top yeshivas. I wish all the boys hatzlachah.

    in reply to: Second Generation BT #1884544
    rational
    Participant

    I did not notice the aversion to using periods at the end of sentences.

    in reply to: The black hat. #1883672
    rational
    Participant

    “I feel it is a major Kavod HaShem to wear a black hat during davening and Shabbos.”

    Then wear it. You need not ask anyone. If it bothers anyone, it’s their problem, not yours.

    in reply to: The (kosher?) elephant in the 5 towns #1882547
    rational
    Participant

    I think the moderators would agree that this OP is a source that could lead to unnecessary negativity. Mods?

    in reply to: Yeshivish Clothing #1879226
    rational
    Participant

    For the purpose of clarity:
    The terms Torah Jew, Ben Torah, Real Yeshiva Bochur, True Y’rei Shamayim, Ba’al Nefesh etc… are synonymous.

    in reply to: Yeshivish Clothing #1879199
    rational
    Participant

    VHere’s comments are not 100% wrong, they are actually mostly right. Whether he has PTSD to deal with does not subtract from their accuracy. Countless mussar shmuesses in high school and onward (apologies to you Syag if you are male, but if I remember correctly you are female) emphasized the Torah Jew Uniform in abject opposition to the non-uniformed , someone who cannot possibly be a Torah Jew. Referencing my parenthetical supposition, you have likely never heard these shmuesses, but I have heard many, and all yeshiva boys I know will corroborate this endemic message. The message is very clear, and it is as I stated: “A non-uniformed boy cannot be a Torah Jew.”
    It is stated simply like that, and the dogma is that simple.

    The only blatant inaccuracy in VHere’s comments is that he believes this approach has been around 30-40 years. I heard it close to 50 years ago. It hasn’t changed much, and history has shown that it enjoys tremendous success. That is a sad presentation.

    Again parenthetically, it was no surprise that 10-15 years ago a major yeshiva photoshopped two blue shirts out of a full bes medrash picture featured in the yeshiva calendar. The photograph was used one year, and the identical photograph was reused the following year sans the two lonely light-blue shirts. Bad publicity that was fixed. The message was obvious. It is what it is. You are better off defending it than denying it.

    in reply to: How was Daf Yomi studied originally? #1879212
    rational
    Participant

    Dear Nomesorah
    Not ignoring you, just haven’t had the time to comment again on this. Hope to get to it next week.
    Shabbat Shalom

    in reply to: Living in Eretz Yisroel #1879160
    rational
    Participant

    The Vayoel Moshe’s interpretation of the Bnei Ephraim’s actions and their eventual defeat is just an interpretation. It is in no way proof of anything. It is important to distinguish support of a position in an argument from proof of that position.

    in reply to: Living in Eretz Yisroel #1879159
    rational
    Participant

    Dear Nomesorah

    I am a Zionist and an observant Jew. I don’t say frum because I know from experience that many Jews, mostly chassidishe do not regard me as frum. Kippah srugah, tzitzit in my pants, no peyos, you get it (yes beard)…No matter.

    Maybe I’m missing something, but I do not detect any animosity from you in our interesting discussions here, and I’m not sure why others are calling you out. No matter. Whether you live in Israel is immaterial for this discussion. I live at the western tip of Eretz Binyamin.

    I think the reason that the three oaths have merited a revival is that for almost two thousand years they were irrelevant. In the traditional understanding of them , till the Zionists showed up, they had never been put to the test, and could be ignored. The ant-zionist Rabbis , knowing shas very well, pulled them out and gave them supreme authority over the future of the Jewish people. To an objective observer, this comes as a surprise. If these oaths are so powerful, where are they battled out in the Rishonim? Why is there total silence in the sifrei halachah and pre-sifrei halachah? The Rosh, the Tur, Or Zarua, Maharam, Ra’avyah, Mechaber, Rama, where is it? The obvious answer is that it is another example among thousands of aggadic discussion, and has minimal if any weight in determining the required behavior of the Nation of Israel .

    As I mentioned, I have a non-traditional but fully “frum” understanding of the three oaths. For another time…

    in reply to: Jeffrey Epstein – part 2 #1879158
    rational
    Participant

    Off-topic comment.
    Dear Syag,
    With due respect, yarmulkes without the apostrophe. No ill will intended.

    in reply to: Shidduchim – Divorced Homes #1877972
    rational
    Participant

    For those insisting on a full-time-long-term-learning-boy:

    I wonder why a young woman would insist (all or nothing?) on a parameter that she cannot possibly verify with any reasonable degree of confidence.

    in reply to: Living in Eretz Yisroel #1877971
    rational
    Participant

    Dear Nomesorah
    Sorry if I wasn’t clear. Of course, the Va’Yoel Moshe’s ideology is based on the three shvuos. The Minchas Elazar was also a quite vociferous bona-fide anti-zionist, I was not aware that it was his chiddush, thanks for pointing that out.

    I have my own interpretation of the three shvuos which obviates the need to find reasons (only aggadah, not paskened l’halachah anywhere, the goyim didn’t keep their end, etc…) to ignore them.

    in reply to: How was Daf Yomi studied originally? #1877970
    rational
    Participant

    Dear nomesorah
    The phenomenon of writing anonymously is quite interesting and amusing, if only because it totally confounds the historians. Who wrote a specific anonymous piece? LOL.

    And yet, there were periods where almost all wrote anonymously, especially early kabbalisitic works from the 4th to 9th centuries after the churban. Apparently, the extreme modesty of these authors enabled them to forego the fame. Since these esoteric works were written for the elite few and were not meant to be seen by the hamon am, it’s not surprising that the author kept silent.

    As far as halachic works go, there were few, and not anonymous, even though our sources are somewhat sketchy.. The ones we know about are the B’hag written in Iraq (?), the Seder Amram Gaon, and the Machzor Vitri, written by R’ Simcha of Vitri. Obviously the latter two are not anonymous.

    As far as perushim of the Talmud, the major question is whether they were written by one person (Rabeinu Hananel ?) or by groups of students of a great teacher, such as Rabeinu Gershom. Most think thet Perush rabeinu Gersom was written by his students and not by him, albeit they were his teachings. As is well known, Rashi was the greatest mefaresh and was able to accomplish what no one since has been able to. Whether he himself wrote all of his perushim or guided and edited what his students wrote in his name is debatable, but his name traveled far and wide very quickly. His Perush was never anonymous, nor was that of the Rashbam . His kuntrusim were so accepted that almost no one felt the need to compete. The result was the expansion of a different form of perush, the dialectic question-answer style of the baa’lei hatosfot. This style was not new, Rashi also used it, but Rabeinu Tam and the Ri perfected it.

    When you become more interested, the two major works on Rashi and Tosfos are Grossman’s חכמי אשכנז הראשונים, חכמי צרפת הראשונים and Auerbach’s groundbreaking work , בעלי התוספות. Almost all later works are based on these.

    Enjoy.

    in reply to: Yeshivish Clothing #1877588
    rational
    Participant

    I agree with the above posters. A yeshiva boy should dress like a yeshiva boy, no ifs, ands, or buts. Once that is accomplished, you can do whatever you want. Your clothes provide the ultimate cover, tartei mashma.

    in reply to: How was Daf Yomi studied originally? #1877443
    rational
    Participant

    Without disparaging either of the two highly esteemed Rabbonim mentioned above, neither is a bona fide historical scholar. Their conclusions are not based on painstaking research of primary sources (kitvei yad, comparisons of different nuschaot, etc…) but on what previous Rabbonim have conjectured. Their writings are beautifully written for the layman but are not considered serious scholarship material. I too had been taught that Rashi wrote his Perush anonymously, but this is no more than romantic hagiographic conjecture without any historical basis.

    For a serious analysis look in Grossman’s חכמי צרפת הראשונים, (see especially pages 227-230) where he quotes Lifshitz, Epstein, Zunz, Friedman, Ta-Shma, Havazelet and others. No one entertains the possibility that Rashi wrote anonymously, quite the contrary. The questions, still under debate, are how many versions of his Perush did Rashi write, what was their nature (original? emendations to previous perushim? written with or by his talmidim?) and separately, what is the nature of Rashi-like perushim (Rashi on the Rif for example), and what happened to the original Rashi Perush on masechtot which clearly were written by others and not Rashi (Rashbam in several places, Nedarim, etc…) ?

    In any case, רב הנסתר על הנגלה on this riveting topic.

    in reply to: How was Daf Yomi studied originally? #1877285
    rational
    Participant

    I know of no evidence that Rashi wrote incognito. He was already famous at age 20, and became Rav of Troyes at age 30 or so, when he established his own yeshiva there. The term “kuntrus” is used only because his perush was published in “notebook=kuntrus” form, with many copies available. This is similar to the famous “stencils” of the Brisker Rov. Say the word “stencil” in yeshivishe circles and everyone knows what is means. That does not make the work anonymous, rather it identifies the author publicly. Thus, it is also unlikely that Rashi needed to quote himself anywhere. All knew of him and his copied works.

    in reply to: Buying land in Israel #1876909
    rational
    Participant

    Speculation on land ownership when the Complete Redemption arrives is a wonderful waste of time.

    I am not a real estate expert. However, my house in the Shomron belongs to me. I can sell it and receive market value. Thousands have done this and it is routine. I have a 49 year land lease from the Zionist State of Israel, and it will most likely be renewed for another 49, and then for another 49, etc… But it and the land underneath are still mine.

    What the OP seems to want is a shtickel piece of land for the purpose of keeping shmittah or simply owning “karka b’eretz yisrael”. If that is so, it is very commendable. It is at least a partial acknowledgement of the pasuk וירישתם אותה וישבתם בה. A nice gesture indeed, and a step in the right direction. Akin to owning a Shas but never opening it. At least if I have it, there is a chance I may one day open it.

    in reply to: Smicha on Shabbos #1875969
    rational
    Participant

    To save you the trouble of learning what a Rov should know, I will provide you with smicha which will give you the personal satisfaction you seek. For a small fee, of course, I also need some personal satisfaction.

    in reply to: Is EMP Strike Imminent? #1875977
    rational
    Participant

    … this possibility …is very likely to happen. …. before Moshiach comes the world will be in darkness for 3 months.

    I’m taking bets, wagers please. I give good odds.

    in reply to: Living in Eretz Yisroel #1874447
    rational
    Participant

    Indeed, it is one of the three shvu’ot as Reb Eliezer pointed out. It is in Kesuvos 110b
    It is the basis for the Satmar anti-zionist ideology. Also see the Tosfos there and the opinion of Rabeinu Chaim.

    I find it odd that someone would denigrate living in Israel because of the “mitzva” , simply because they don’t raise sheep or donkeys. Besides, any person with some Talmudic knowledge should know that Petter Hamor or Reishit Hagez is a mitzvah kiyumit and there is no obligation to own a donkey or raise sheep. If yishuv EY is indeed one of the 613 mitzvot, it is an obligation, a hovat gavra.

    Nonetheless, most everyone I know who moved to Israel did so because this is Home for the Jewish people. As I mentioned above, it should be obvious to all.

    in reply to: Living in Eretz Yisroel #1874107
    rational
    Participant

    “Maybe we need to think about where we can be the best that we can be using our full capabilities to fulfill the ratzon hashem and raise our children to be the best they can be too.”

    Maybe, just maybe, the retzon hashem is for us to live in the land He promised us, and to raise our children to be the best they can be in the land that He promised us. Crazy idea, I know.

    in reply to: Living in Eretz Yisroel #1874090
    rational
    Participant

    There are those who intuitively understand that a Jew’s place is in The Land. The Torah, starting from the beginning and continuing to the end is the story of the Jewish people striving to live in The Land. It is so obvious, that it is indeed wondrous that so many have missed it.

    Reb Eliezer the Learned, not all of us are out of place.

    in reply to: Say “NO” To Trump’s Peace Plan #1869515
    rational
    Participant

    Every person is entitled to an opinion. However, if one expects their opinion on this matter to be considered seriously, one must fulfill two conditions.
    1. Live and work in the country that will have to deal with the ramifications of this opinion.
    2. Read the pertinent facts and nuances in the local Hebrew press and Hebrew media, and not from translations in the American media.

    Has any commenter above fulfilled these conditions?

    in reply to: Camp Morris #1868523
    rational
    Participant

    Oh hi DC, still waiting for you to deliver on your guarantee. Don’t bother answering, I’ll check in once in a while.

    in reply to: Commemoration of the 20th of Sivan #1868522
    rational
    Participant

    I think the expression was פולניה as in פה לן קה

    in reply to: How was Daf Yomi studied originally? #1868005
    rational
    Participant

    When the Netziv was Rosh Yeshiva in Volozhin, the policy was that the yeshiva learned a daf a day.

    in reply to: Suppression of Looters and Rioters #1867415
    rational
    Participant

    From the comments above, it appears that the violence and looting have not affected the Jewish community. All the comments are opinions from the outside looking in. Is my impression correct?

    in reply to: יום המיוחס #1865664
    rational
    Participant

    That’s interesting, no mention was made of the “plethora of Torah shiurim” on Memorial Day.
    I assume that since working people had the day off, they spent the day of Yom Hameyuchas learning Torah. I assume they do the same every Sunday, which is also a day off. I wasn’t aware that every Sunday there is an upsurge in Torah Learning. But if there is, that’s wonderful. God Bless America.

    in reply to: יום המיוחס #1864343
    rational
    Participant

    Dear 147
    I live in Israel, where the second day of Sivan is simply יום המיוחס , the second day of Sivan. I didn’t know that HKBH rules the world according to the national holidays of the United States of America.

    My son was in America for a while, and a prominent Rav asked him when Tu B’shvat comes out this year. My son answered “on Tu B’shvat, what do you mean?” How sad that Jews in America have become more Jewish Americans than Jews in America.

    in reply to: Post Corona: The New Frum Community #1862687
    rational
    Participant

    As takahmamash implied, come to live in Israel. It’s God’s country.

    in reply to: Reader Responds to Seminary Woes #1859102
    rational
    Participant

    Jews from all over the world have the opportunity to visit, study and even live in the Land that God watches over and has given to the Jewish people as a Morashah. To see and walk on the same roads as Avraham Avinu. To see the lands that Yehoshua conquered, that the shvatim shared, the land of Gidon, Shmuel, Dvora. The land that we are all about and that is the single major topic in all Kitvei Hakodesh.

    How sad that one reads here that it is a trivial and unnecessary parcel of land. No need to visit, no need to have it as part of our lives. We’ve done without it for so long, who needs it now. Afra L’pumayih.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 262 total)