TGIShabbos

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Viewing 27 posts - 1 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • in reply to: Hungry for News #1861784
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Those ads are primarily from families who didn’t insure themselves with life insurance, medical insurance coverage, or homeowners/renters insurance.

    in reply to: Which cities in the US will have summer camp open? #1861783
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    I’m surprised no one brought it up— why would you travel hundreds (or thousands) of miles away from your OBGYN, the hospital you plan on delivering in, and away from the resources at home? Forget about asking a YWN coffee room, speak with your medical doctors about your plan.

    in reply to: How Corona Taught Klal Yisroel to Make Small Simchas #1841499
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    It’s rare that I agree, but Jospeh is making accurate and excellent points. We are discovering what’s really important (from an halachic and practical standpoint) with regards to simchos. Maybe now we won’t see tzedaka campaigns collecting upwards of $100,000 for a wedding for an orphan, widower, someone on hard times- because at the end of the day what really matters is making sure the marriage is successful and making sure they have a roof over their heads—- the campaigns accomplish neither.

    in reply to: Purim Parties in Lakewood #1838591
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    “What could be the problem”. Umm…. illness, deaths? Perhaps you’re kidding. First off, Purimis Rabbinic, so let’s understand that. I was told that if one is sick and had a choice between hearing Parshas zachur or the megillah, we strive for hearing Zachur, which is d’Orysa on several levels. All the more so, Parties, chaggigahs, and large gatherings have no mitzvah and have no place this particular year. Better to give kavod to protecting life, ensuring shuls and yeshivahs remain open the days after Purim, and we can prepare for Pesach.

    in reply to: Private Mikva for Men #1790071
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    With the unfortunate year we have been having, I’d suggest NOT using a lake, river, or ocean

    in reply to: Does Joseph Live in Eretz Yisroel? #1740480
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Narrow it down by continent

    in reply to: Scranton, PA #1722283
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    zahava, I’d guess that Scranton never took off because 1. It’s not a robust job market or roaring economy 2. From what I heard the winter in Scranton can make NYC seem balmy

    in reply to: How much did you pay for your hand shmura matza? #1716812
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    $12/lb round hand Shmurah matzah from Cedar Market Teaneck. I feel that many people spend a lot of time, energy, money, and devotion towards XYZ matzah baked exclusively by Rav XYZ, and similar concept for their wine selection, but forget that (perhaps) the main and largest mitzvah of the night is Magid. I love a great wine at a wedding or restaurant during the year, but the seder is the opportunity for me to spend more time and devotion of resources towards Tzippur yeszias Mitzrayim with my children. Let’s remember what the Ikkur is! {And for those that say you can do both- sure, I don’t doubt you. Just make sure to look forward to the mitzvos of the night more-so than a fine Non-Mevushal Argentinian wine which you’ll forget about in a week}

    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Yseribus, regarding the crime in Baltimore: Are you kidding me? April Fools Day has passed, my friend. There is nothing to agree or disagree with Joseph, he has statistical sources. Even without sources, you’d be naive to think that aggressive crimes (such as murder, rape, aggravated assault, aggravated robbery, car theft) trumps higher than the national average in a troubled city like Baltimore than in suburban areas like Lakewood and Monsey. You can’t name a single person from Baltimore in prison? I sure can; Tivontre Gatling-Mouzon (first search that comes up on the internet when searching Baltimore crime).
    Let me ask you a question. Why do I have many frum friends from Baltimore (currently residing with me in NJJ) who tell me that the Baltimore frum community is very friendly and open but wouldn’t move back there with children nowadays?
    Here is the FBI Source Joseph is talking about “Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. is infamous for its very high crime rate, including a violent crime rate that ranks high above the national average. Violent crime spiked in 2015 after the death of Freddie Gray on April 19, 2015, which touched off riots and an increase in murders. The city recorded a total of 344 homicides in 2015, a number second only to the number recorded in 1993 when the population was 100,000 higher” Source: FBI 2015 UCR data

    in reply to: Ice cream called “big gay” certified kosher-what’s your take? #1702826
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    LOTR92, exactly! Agreed.      edited      Hashgachos are to supervise the kashrus of the food, that is what I am expecting when I dine at a restaurant. If I am uncomfortable with the TV situation, then I dine elsewhere.

    in reply to: Ice cream called “big gay” certified kosher-what’s your take? #1702822
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    I actually agree with GadolHadorah on this one 100%. It’s not the job of the OU to control the politics of a food item, the back-cover of a box of cereal, or the product name. I recall seeing an OU-D chocolate Santa and a chocolate cross, but no hechsher on a box of Channuka cookies. Would I buy it?– No. Would I make a fuss?– No How about Hershey’s making egg shaped chocolates for Easter? Should I go on…..?

    I don’t see anything wrong with the actual flavors of “Big Gay Ice Cream”. From their website here is an example of a flavor description “Rocky Roadhouse is our version of this classic flavor that starts with creamy milk chocolate ice cream and adds in dark chocolate bar chunks, almonds, mini marshmallows and then swirls of hazelnut fudge. Thus making ours a little extra gooey and therefore a little extra delicious.”

    in reply to: Don’t move to Lakewood before having a school 4 the kids #1562988
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Joseph, Apparently you’ve never heard of Chofetz Chaim in Queens. What an insulting statement you made.

    in reply to: Baltimores chassidish community is growing by leaps and bounds!!!! #1554168
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    I don’t know much about the Baltimore frum community, but I know from consistent news postings (and married friends who have moved out of there) that they are competing for Detroit for the most dangerous, declining, scandalous cities out there. For a frum family with kids, would I say front lawns and store parking lots are as safe or clean as those in Lakewood or Monsey?- I’d say not

    in reply to: Reformed Are Jews? #1553040
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    I taught this past year at a Reform Temple and won’t continue. I can compromise all the energy I have to try to be “neutral” with their ways and understandings of Judaism, but it truly became impossible. First, (as some others here pointed out) several students were not Jewish (because of an non-Jewish mother)- so they wouldn’t even be allowed alone in a room with a non-mevushal bottle of wine. Second, I kept my politics to my self, but EVERYTHING about that Reform Temple and their clergy is about politics- one way or another. Whether it’s regarding feminism (even though I found it discriminatory that their Temple’s “Rabbi”, Cantor, president, and school leadership were all women, with not one male), or opening our homes and our lives to the disadvantaged one (LGBTQ) and fully open borders (since we were once slaves in Egypt), and being “fair” to Israel and the Palestinians. I’m still not sure how since Yosef Avinu was a stranger in the land, why we must open our homes for LGBTQ non-documented immigrants? Many students told me that religion is something nice to believe in and something to study as an academia, but they don’t believe in the Torah or in a G-D. Third, their entire fiber is falling apart, regarding their school enrollment numbers, their membership, their donations, etc. They blame the low school enrollment on social media and cellphones (but somehow neighboring Frum shuls and yeshivas in neighboring Bergen Co are excelling).

    Concluding, I don’t believe they have a future, I don’t believe they are or want to be part of what Judaism has to offer.

    in reply to: The Sewer Pipe That Leads to Your Head #1529706
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    I’ve met some frum people in my life who have filthier mouths and values than those talk show hosts who have been on for decades. One doesn’t excuse another, but listening to a particular host on the radio on the way home is certainly not a bum and certainly not a piece of sewage (because he is a secular Jew, I will not say his name as per Loshon Hara). R’ Miller (perhaps innocently without realization) doesn’t realize that many in the radio/television news media business are Jewish (secular), and must be careful to distance himself from hatred and L’H, especially if he doesn’t fully know what goes on in a 3 hour evening segment.

    in reply to: How Democrats Can Help Reduce Gas Prices #1525805
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Believe me, I know about the sorrows of taxes. I used to live in FL and now live in Northern NJ. With our (NJ, NY, NYC) mayors and governors, I don’t see any silver lining on the horizon to cut the gas taxes. I’m just happy I can still can plastic bags at the grocery store.

    in reply to: How Democrats Can Help Reduce Gas Prices #1525775
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    To #1, I’m glad you are concerned about the NY taxpayer. What about the NJ, FL, TX, MA, OH, etc. taxpayer?

    And BTW, NY would probably be that last state to let get of the gas tax, just like they will lower the price of the $17 Verazanno Bridge toll.

    in reply to: Would you let your children listen to non-jewish music? #1520736
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Shopping, I have to respectfully disagree with you. Most Jewish music is not enjoyable for me and many of the songs/music begin to sound so generic (and corny, if you will)- but that’s me, I understand some may agree and disagree. For me it doesn’t set me in the right mode for davening. Although when driving I much prefer the AM dial (for Savage, Hannity, sports, news), I really enjoy Big Band Music of the 1940’s including Nat King Cole, Bennet, Sinatra, etc. If after hearing “I left my Heart in San Francisco” causes me or my children to think of aveiros or non-Torah ideals, then we would be seeing both a Rav and a therapist.

    in reply to: best place to live? #1514241
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Joseph, in a previous coffee table discussion you refer to the US and other European countries as being some of the worst places for Jews ruchniyos-wise. However, in this discussion you express such a strong distaste for Jews living in Israel as .

    Conflicting yourself, You argue that Orthodox intermarriage is close to zero (see above) and argue that E”Y would be far worse (ruchniyos) than in Chutz L’ Aretz.

    What is it Joseph? I know we will never agree, but I’d be curious to see the real YOU and what you really believe in. Not just conflicting arguments

    “Joseph
    Participant
    The Jews who came to America before WWII had a far far higher OTD rate than the Jews who remained in Europe. ”

    “Joseph
    Participant
    Avi, Germany was the worst place ruchniyos-wise in Europe for Jews. But despite all the points you mentioned, prewar America was much worse than virtually any place in Europe. For a frum European Jew to move to America before WWII, there was an undeniably large risk that they — or more likely their children and/or grandchildren –would r”l become OTD; much more likely than in Europe.”

    in reply to: best place to live? #1513401
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Joseph, I had a divorced UK woman for shabbos lunch this past week. Her parents are looking to get out of London because the fanatic Muslim presence is becoming a big challenge for many frum Jews there. Her sheitel was ripped off her head one shabbos (and she was thankful that’s all the harm she experienced)I am not looking to “win” this argument over the growing antisemitism and danger for Jews in many parts of Europe because none of us “win” by those daily realities.

    Or how about the South African gentleman in my shul who wears a black hat and jacket for each daily minyan in NJ, and won’t even wear a yarmulka in the streets of Johannesburg, SA.

    The many time I’ve visited Israel, not ONCE has a “zionist” police officer or IDF soldier pushed my yarmulka off or made me feel in danger of wearing one. I can’t say the same for Jews in Europe, South Africa.

    If a frum Jew experiences physical violence in Israel, the violence and hated is from the radical Muslims and Palestinians. I can watch CNN, BBC, or NBC if I want someone to tell me that it’s the IDF and the Israeli government causing danger for the world.

    in reply to: best place to live? #1513297
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Joseph…. Wow, you really a man with such hatred and distaste of other Jews. Maybe you should book a speaking engagement to frum families who lost young children to Palestinian attacks, and you can blame the “Zionist” government and the IDF!
    I don’t think any convincing or rational thought will ever allow you to realize that Hezbollah, Hamas, ISIS, and many Muslims want us killed, and have been unfortunately successfully far too many times. Look at the frum communities in France, UK, Germany – frum Jews are being physically and spiritually slaughtered there. Look at the USA where are overall Jewish population is decreasing rapidly due to intermarriage and interfaith (Pew Research). Although a much lower percentage than Conservative and Reform, intermarriage amonst the US Orthodox is highest in the world.

    Continue looking at the progress in Israel as “half empty”. I’ve look at the yeshivas, seminaries, mikvahs, Batei Midrashim, kosel, etc.

    Without Torah, Israel won’t exist. Without the IDF, Israel won’t exist.

    in reply to: BT vs FFB #1511984
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Chaim Eliezer, regarding the E. European Jews who came to this country during the turn of the last century- you are right that many gave up the fundamentals like shabbos and kosher, however I’d like to wonder how involved they were in Europe with their Yidishkeit. There is nothing wrong with a healthy balance of culture, arts, etc—- but for far too many Jews, the arts and theater became the Ikkur of their lives, not the side dish. We still see the stubbornness today in 2018 with non-observant obituaries where the deceased requests all charities go to the city’s art or music museum and NOT the yeshiva, day-school, or synagogues, or even the local JCC. Reform and Conservative Synagogues can’t be surprised why their funding is becoming limited, when many of their deceased members request donations be sent to the arts.

    So from cradle to grave those types of E. European Jews were more involved with culture and arts than with Jewish involvement- can we really consider them FFB?! —- Most likely I’d consider their children BTs (if THEY choose the privilege of becoming frum)

    in reply to: BT vs FFB #1511282
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Avram in MD, that’s an interesting perspective I’ve never thought of. I’ve bugged my wife for a while with my question over why many BTs try to shoot up to an unreasonable point, then many fall to eating a cheeseburger in a bar on a Friday night 7 years later. Immaturity and timing very well might be part of the “bad” formula why this occurs more often than we all think. Immaturity without the added support of frum parents/siblings makes it all the more so challenging and lonely.

    A pet peeve of mine was all the vast amount of sefarim these bochurim bought and kept by their “makom” in the Beis Medrash. I always thought that 5 or 6 sidurim were a little extreme (and we aren’t even including machzorim for the yomim tovim). Better to have 1 solid siddur and use it today and in 10 years, than 6 sidurim and using 0 later one.

    {I don’t mean to generalize all BTs, as many are frum and wonderful for many years to come}

    in reply to: BT vs FFB #1510867
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    I am an FFB. When I was in Yeshiva way-back-when there were many BTs. Many of the BTs were friends of mine and really enjoyable to be around, however I don’t think I 100% understand all of their ways. I coined the term “more religious than thou”. Many shidduch offerings were not ‘religious enough’ for them, but were somehow suitable for other FFB yeshivish guys who became engaged. Disposing ALL of their colored dress shirts (I didn’t need to go shopping those years). Not wanting to EVER return back to their non-religious home, although they said their parents were respectful and accommodating- dismissing the option of purchasing their own frozen meals and walking to their nearby Chabad on Shabbos. —- Sadly 10 years later, (according to social media) many of these men are no longer religious at all as the pictures reveal bar pictures on Friday nights, no yarmulka, way of dress, type of men/women they hung out with, treif restaurants, etc.

    Concluding, life can be very hard for a BT if they don’t maintain reasonable accommodations for themselves and appropriate goals & expectations, as I’ve seen it becomes an “All or nothing” 5-10 years later. No one is going to become the Chofetz Chaim overnight, regardless if one is a BT or FFB. Better to wear the blue dress shirts on Tuesday than to expect to know all of Shas by the summer. Thus, I believe FFB has IT easier than a BT.

    in reply to: Hawking is dead #1489154
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    Imagine if Hawking spent his life with no physical or verbal limitations— the amount of damage he would have caused against Israel, Jews, and all nations who believe in a God. As he a Pro-Palestinian and BDS supporter, I am not tearing my shirt for him today.

    in reply to: Have We Made Peseach Too Easy? #1487510
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    laskern, unless I am mistaken does one receive a bigger mitzvah because he spent more time and effort preparing for it? Because, if that’s the case with the channuka menorah- you should be planting the olive trees, picking them, squeezing them into oil, and pouring it in menorah cups with cotton wicks which you also planted and picked. With matzah, you’ll be in the fields for months preparing the harvest, then making the dough, and baking them yourselves.

    in reply to: Have We Made Peseach Too Easy? #1487103
    TGIShabbos
    Participant

    The fundamentals (mitzvos) of Pesach are matzah, marror, and recalling the story of Exodus. If the modern conveniences of 2018 allow me to perform the objects of Pesach easier and with better ability, then I’m all for it. Sadly, many struggle with those mitzvos. Am I jealous that the cleaning lady does the heavy parts of cleaning the home?– No. Am I jealous that the Jews of yesteryear had to prepare gefilte fish from scratch for many hours in the bath tub(and I can just purchase an $2.99 OU-P jar of gefilte Fish)?– No

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