anIsraeliYid

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  • in reply to: shidduch prospects #2075587
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Yes.

    in reply to: Two Years since Covid #2072363
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    ujm – I actually agree with you on this one. Wow.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Missing a parsha #2072201
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    The chiyuv to hear every Parsha is a chiyuv of the Tzibur, not the Yachid – so technically, you’re OK if you miss a Parsha. That being said, if you’re in the US with a group of people, you can see if you can find a Minyan (and Ba’al Koreh) who are willing to Lein the whole Parshas Bechukosai at Shabbos Mincha before you fly back (i.e., call up Kohen, Levi, and then finish the Parsha on Yisrael) – that’s what happened once in a situation I was in where I and a group of relatives flew in to the US for a wedding. Good luck!

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Daylight Savings time #2069855
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    In London, sunrise in late December/early January is as late as 8:06 AM, and in Amsterdam, it’s as late as 8:50 AM, and that’s on standard time. What do people in those places do? If I remember correctly, people in the NY area in the 1970s went to Minyanim in the area where they worked due to this – so I guess places like the Wall Street Synagogue, or places on the Lower East Side, will get an influx of Mispalelim.

    For purely personal reason, I like the US having year-round DST, since it makes the time difference between NY and Israel only six hours for part of the year – much better for work (two overlapping work hours vs. one) and for personal reasons if I want to speak with people in the US.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Joe Biden is not the 46th President of the United States of America. #2056282
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    TS Baum – you are incorrect that Biden is the 45th person elected president – he is only the 41st.
    Presidents James Tyler, Andrew Johnson, Chester Arthur, and Gerald Ford were never elected president, and in fact, Ford was never even elected vice-president.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Chug Chasam Sofer Petach Tikva #2050037
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Mod-29 – every single participant in this thread is using a handle that is clearly not a real name – making them anonymous. I do concede, though, that not everyone here is a troll – though there are definitely some here who are regularly trollish in other threads (hello, Joseph/ujm/whatever handle you’re using today!).

    in reply to: Chug Chasam Sofer Petach Tikva #2049468
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    You should ask your personal Posek, not a bunch of anonymous internet trolls.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Kollel life with no parental support #2047185
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    amom – much Hatzlacha to you. Almost 30 years ago, my wife and I found ourselves in a similar position. The conclusion was that it was time for me to leave Kolel and find a job so that we could support ourselves.

    I spoke with my R”Y, Rav Yisroel Belsky ZT”L, prior to taking this step. He told me then that what’s more important than when one leaves Kolel to join the working world is the attitude one takes when leaving – i.e., does one continue to place one’s obligations to Torah and Yiddishkeit at the center of one’s value system, or does one push it to the side to pursue the American dream. I’ve striven to make sure that, while fully active in the professional world, Torah comes first – I’ve continued to be Kove’a Itim since, including, while still in the US, still showing up in Yeshiva for morning Seder on Sundays, since I did not have work obligations then (Sunday afternoons were reserved for doing things with my family – they deserve some attention too, after all).

    Much Hatzlacha to you, whatever way forward you ultimately choose.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Six Figure Salaries #2025155
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Depends where. In Israel, for example, one can do reasonably with a somewhat lower income due to the Israeli government’s generous support for Torah education and other requirements of Frum life that need to be paid for privately in the US. In the US, the situation is obviously different.

    Medical care is also generally less expensive in Israel.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Where is the line between halacha and dinas dimalchusa #2006690
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Nochum Dokshitz – can you give Mekoros for your statements that Dina d’Malchusa being only for financial matters, and that the only issue otherwise is not getting caught due to Chilul Hashem? In any case, even according to your stated logic, there’s always a better-than-you-think chance that you’ll be caught, thereby causing a Chulul Hashem – so that in and of itself should be a reason to FOLLOW THE LAW.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: is coffee kosher? #1955817
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    The 10% infestation rate cited in the article does not mean that 10% of the beans are actually insects or filth – it means that 10% of the beans show signs of insect infestation or filth. The actual percentage that consists of insects is much lower, and is batul. As the beans are then roasted and ground up, the odds of there being an entire insect are tiny – so drink up and enjoy!

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Techeiles and Bal Tosif #1934816
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Why would there be an issue of Ba’al Tosif? Technically, tzitzis (other than the required p’sil techeles) can be any color – there is no requirement for them to be white. As such, even if the current version of techeles is not correct, Ba’al Tosef would not be an issue. I could see that yuhara could be an issue, whether it is correct or not (though more of an issue if it’s not), but even that is questionable.

    As an aside – Rav Yisrael Belsky, Z”L, personally told me that he thought the current techeles from the Machon P’til Techelet is correct. He further told me that the only reason he did not wear it publicly was on account of yuhara – so he only wore it on Shabbos on his Talis Katan, when it would be hidden under his Kapoto.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: The Empty Wagon – great book, but berating specific frum Jews is assur #1902209
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    HaKatan – you keep on repeating the same tired points, while either ignoring or denigrating the views of those with whom you disagree. The volume of your verbiage does not reflect the strength of your view – bloviation does not equal evidence. I therefore see no point in continuing this dialogue.

    Wishing you a K’siva v’Chasima Tova,

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: The Empty Wagon – great book, but berating specific frum Jews is assur #1902166
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    HaKatan – I specifically did not state that Rabbi Hoffman wrote a review of Rabbi Shapiro’s Satmar-oriented sefer. I stated that you should read what Rabbi Hoffman wrote for a counterview. Satmar – and Rabbi Shapiro – are perfectly entitled to their view. Rabbi Hoffman’s article presents a different view, and notes the Gedolim that supported such contrary view.

    You have chosen a Shita to follow. It is far from the universal – or even majority – view at this time, and attempting to say otherwise – or to state with certainty what the Gedolim of yesteryear would have said today – is simply an attempt to fool yourself.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: The Empty Wagon – great book, but berating specific frum Jews is assur #1901377
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Rabbi Shapiro has his Satmar-affiliated shita, but it is far from being the mainstream view. His insistence on painting the “Zionists” as a single monolithic bloc, all of whom were bent on eradicating Torah from Klal Yisrael and replacing it with Zionist views, is misguided at best and disingenuous at worst.

    For a well-written and cogent counterview, just look up Rabbi Yair Hoffman’s review of this book.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Time to remember the soldiers #1854941
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Joseph – that’s right, dismiss anything that doesn’t agree with your view as not true. It’s not from some “Zionist book” – it’s a widely-quoted story that is cited by many non-Zionist sources as well (I googled it and found multiple sources immediately). I also found the following re: Rav Chaim Shmulevitz ZT”L of Mir:

    “At the outbreak of the Yom Kippur War, when throughout the country the alarm was sounded at the height of the day, yeshiva students gathered at the Mir Yeshiva in Jerusalem shelter to hear words of encouragement. The Rosh Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Shmulevitz zt”l first began addressing the fighting in the front: ‘The soldiers,’ he said, ‘who risk their lives for our rescue at this time – the entire world cannot stand in their midst. Our obligation is to pray about and for them has no bounds. If for a person who opened the door of his house before his friend Chazal have said that he owes him his life, let alone those who give up their lives, we must thank him without limit.’ ”

    So, to the original question – can you please enlighten us as to why in your Gadlus you disagree with Rav Shlomo Zalman, ZT”L? For that matter – with Rav Chaim Shmulevitz, ZT”L too? I’m sure you must have a good reason to disagree with the Gedolim, oh Wise One of the YWN Coffee Room.

    Also – you are ignoring the answer I gave as to why this particular day was chosen – it is the Yahrtzeit of a large group of Jews who were massacred by Arabs because they were Jews.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Time to remember the soldiers #1854735
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Joseph – just to clarify – you’re disagreeing with Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach, zt”l, who, when alive, was considered the leader of Chareidi Jews in Israel, who clearly said that the soldiers buried at Har Hertzel are Kedoshim. Is that correct? If so, can you please tell me why you, the eminent YWN Coffee Room Gadol, disagree with Rav Shlomo Zalman? I’m sure you must have some deep Amkus in Torah that supports your view against one of the preeminent Gedolim of the generation, and we would be blessed if you’d enlighten us with your brilliance.

    As to why this particular day was chosen – it was the day on which Kfar Etzion fell, and its defenders were massacred by the Arab attackers. A Yahrtzeit is a time to commemerate, no?

    an Israeli Yid

    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    To those asking why this is different from Holocaust or Inquisition – my Rav gave a very good explanation. This is not a Sha’as haShmad, where we are being persecuted because of our Yiddishkeit, and where there is therefore a specific inyan to be Moser Nefesh. Here, HKB”H is the one who is effectively telling us to stay home.

    We need to be mispalel on our own that this Magefa end – as David haMelech said when there was a Magefa in Klal Yisrael “Nifla Na b’Yad Hashem Ki Rabim Rachamav” – we accept our punishment from Hashem, and rely on his mercy, and are thankful that that the punishment is not from the hand of Man.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Mishing on Pesach #1846989
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    On the general issue of “mishing” – there are many who will not mish on Pesach, but have no problem buying products produced by others – whether commercially or individually – before Pesach. The reason is that before Pesach, one can be somech on Bitul even for Chametz Gamur (though that of course is not what we want to do) – while on Pesach, Chametz is not Batul even in 1.000, so people want to be extra careful on Pesach itself.

    As an aside – I was told by my grandmother that the reason people had a Minhag not to eat garlic is because in Europe, farmers used to dip the garlic in flour before bringing it to the marketplace to sell in order to make it look whiter.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Backyard minyanim #1846356
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Following is from Rav Hershel Schachter, via YUTorah. You can find the whole thing, including the Hebrew with the Ma’areh Mekomos, if you go to that site and look for “Piskei Corona 14”. I tried copying the Hebrew over, but the formatting got messed up, so I only copied the English.

    an Israeli Yid

    Ten men who are standing on different porches cannot be joined together in order to constitute a
    minyan even though they can all see each other. In order to constitute a minyan for Devarim
    She’bekedusah (like Kaddish and Kedushah), the ten men must all be standing in the same room. (It
    should be noted that in smaller spaces, such as a shiva ho
    use, care should be taken to make sure that ten
    men are davening together in the same room. If less than ten are davening in one room and less than ten
    in an adjacent room, even though they can clearly see one another, this would not constitute a minyan.
    In order to create a minyan there must be ten participants davening in the same room.)
    It should certainly be discouraged for people to make a minyan outside on the lawn even if they maintain
    the minimum distance recommended by the health department. One should not place himself even
    into a situation of a doubtful sakanah in order to daven with a minyan.

    in reply to: Backyard minyanim #1843677
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    HIE – I’m not a mumcheh, so I can’t say for certain that “ro’in zeh es zeh” is or is not enough; I just recall that when we had ten people split between two rooms, even when they could see each other, my Rosh Yeshiva would insist that we have a minimum of ten in a single room before he’d allow us to Daven as a Minyan. It could well be that we’re now in a situation where we can be Somech on Shitos that are more Meikil on this – and it could also be that my Rosh Yeshiva was being Machmir on a Shita that is not universally accepted only because it was possible to be Machmir at the time.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Backyard minyanim #1843306
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    HIE – are you sure that this counts as a Minyan, since everyone is in a different Reshus? As I remember the Halacha (and I could be mistaken), you need to have ten men in a single Reshus to have a Minyan. Someone who is not in that Reshus and Davens with them is considered to be Davening b’Tzibur, but can’t count towards the Minyan.

    Here in Israel, the Misrad HaBri’ut is still allowing outdoor Minyanim of ten exactly, provided social distancing is observed. As such, I’ve seen a number of “parking lot Minyanim”, consisting mainly or exclusively of people from that single building. The Rabbanut allows this, but there are many individual Rabbanim who are either forbidding such Minyanim or strongly discouraging them – and each person should follow his Posek, provided they are within the guidelines of the Misrad HaBri’ut.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Coronavirus versus the Seasonal Flu #1843307
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    I await the apologies/retractions of akuperma and the others who were saying, long after it was obvious that it was not the case, that this is no more than “a bad flu”, especially now that the Frum/Yeshivish community is affected so heavily.

    I’m not holding my breath…

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Does all Chabad agree with him??? #1806652
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    The Gemara also says that Chizkiyahu HaMelech was worthy of being Mashiach, but the Dor wasn’t worthy. If Mashiach can come from the dead (even after they’ve been resurrected), then why doesn’t the Gemara say that he could STILL be Mashiach?

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Is it better to be Chassidish or Litvish? #1803143
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    It’s best to be a Shomer Torah u’Mitzvos.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Keeping the Siyum Hashas Sacred. #1796493
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Haimy – I agree with you. I remember the first Siyum in the Felt Forum, as well as the ones in MSG – the chill I felt hearing Rav Schwab ZT”L tell a story of a child killed in the Holocaust, the feeling I had, even as a child, that I was part of something special – something that I could aspire to be a “real” participant in when I would be old enough to learn Daf Yomi. Now? Have a few extra bucks, be a big Knocker. It’s lost that specialness – which is why I’ll be participating only remotely, in an out-of-town Shul with a feed from the “main event”. I’d rather participate in the true Simcha of those I’ve learned the Daf with all these years than just be a part of an “event”.

    an Israeli Yid (currently in CHU”L, where it’s not yet Shabbos)

    in reply to: Star-K Article about Electric Shavers #1750375
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    To those who say that Rav Moshe, ZT”L, was a Da’as Yachid – I can personally say that I spoke with Rav Yisrael Belsky ZT”L about shavers, and he said that as long as it was not a lift-and-cut, it was fine.

    And yes, I do generally follow Rav Belsky’s Chumros as well as his Kulos.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: WARNING : Shemita wines being sold in NY/NJ #1724920
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Nechomah – Heter Mechira wine, when received as a gift prior to the Zman Bi’ur, is actually Muttar to drink since it’s only mekach u’memkar that’s Assur for Peiros Shvi’is – and if you’ve received it for free, you did nothing wrong. The issue is if it’s after the zman bi’ur, since if the Heter Mechira is not good (a separate conversation), then it’s peiros shvi’is that did not go throguh bi’ur when required – and are therefore assur to you forever – but also can’t be destroyed as they have kedushas shvi’is.

    BTW, the psak I got on something like this is that since there are rabbanim whom one can be somech on for the heter mechira – including Rav Ovadia Yosef ZT”L, one is allowed to give such a product to someone who does use heter mechira for that person to use. As always, though, ask your local orthodox rabbi.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: WARNING : Shemita wines being sold in NY/NJ #1724937
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Zvika – if a product was originally Otzar Beis Din, and then someone took it and sold it shelo k’din, that does not change its status at the time that it was Otzar Beis Din. As such, if you consider the hechsher that stated that it was Otzar Beis Din reliable, and the wine was still in production at the zman bi’ur, it should still be fine, even if someone else sold it afterwards.

    Re: destroying unspoiled Kedushas Shvi’is products – I find the psak you quote from Rav Elyashiv ZT”L very strange, as it contradicts what I’ve heard from all of my Rabe’im and Poskim over the years. Are you absolutely sure he said that?

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: WARNING : Shemita wines being sold in NY/NJ #1724372
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Zvika – I suggest you read the article on the MK’s website (linked above) re: the Bi’ur issue – they note that as the wine was not ready then, it was still in the hands of the Otzar Beis Din at the zman bi’ur, which is considered to be in the hands of the public – so as it was not in the possession of any one individual then, there was no need for bi’ur. The MK article also address the other issues you mention.

    Also, you are dead wrong on the treatment of something that was chayav in bi’ur and it wasn’t done. it CAN NOT be spilled out or otherwise destroyed, as it’s still Kedushas Shvi’is, but it also can not be used. It has to be put aside until it spoils on its own, and can only then be disposed of. As it relates to wine in sealed bottles, this is a problem, as the wine will generally not spoil for decades or longer if left alone – so the individual has to leave it on its own essentially forever…

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: WARNING : Shemita wines being sold in NY/NJ #1723999
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Nechomah – if the wines in question are Otzar Beis Din, then they’re not Heter Mechira.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: WARNING : Shemita wines being sold in NY/NJ #1723829
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    IsometimesAgree – thanks for the link to the article – it’s a very good summary of the issue. One minor point re: one of the examples they bring, though – they mention that if one used Shmita onions to make soup, the entire soup is Kedushas Shviis. The problem is that it’s pretty much impossible now to have a situation where Shmita vegetables are Mutar at all (the Shita of the Chazon Ish on Yevul Nochri notwithstanding), since Shmita vegetables, even if they grow on their own, are Assur miderabanan under the Gzeira of Sfichin! A better example would have been something made with Shmita fruit…

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: WARNING : Shemita wines being sold in NY/NJ #1720400
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    There are several problems with Kedushas Shviis produce in Chutz LaAretz, including that there’s a Chiyuv to do Bi’ur on it at a certain time – and if this was not done, the item is Assur forever, but can not be destroyed. Also, there is an Issur to bring Peiros Shviis out of Halachic Eretz Yisrael, or to purchase Peiros Shviis (Otzar Beis Din is a way around this, but has very specific rules). The issue of how to deal with leftovers (which Klugeryid brings up) is complex, as those of us who are lucky enough to live in Eretz Yisrael know.

    Based on these issues, I’d be very, very hesitant to purchase any of the wines in question.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Tax Time Nightmare….Trump’s Tax Reforms Cost me big time #1710972
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    CTL – I’m kind of curious as to why the change in deductibility of state and local taxes impacted your overall taxes so significantly. I’ve not yet done my taxes (still waiting for information from certain partnerships), but based on my experience, many (if not most) middle-to-upper income individuals were in AMT in the past – where the SALT deduction is added back – which mitigated the effect of the new limitation. Of greater import is the loss of the personal and dependent exemptions, particularly if one itemizes and therefore does benefit from the higher standard deduction, or had many dependents who are above the age for the child tax credit – but the exemption was subject to a phase-out, so impact is also limited for higher-income individuals. As such, I’m wondering (professional curiosity – I’m a tax professional, though in the corporate area) what the main driver was for your increased liability?

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Rabbi Tzion Menachem?! #1683934
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Uncle Ben – the point on checking out if one knows Niglah before giving any credence to their supposed knowledge of Nistar is one that I used to hear regularly from an older relative who was a known Talmid Chacham. Unfortunately, though, I am aware of some fraudsters who are knowledgeable in Torah but have turned it into a shovel to dig with – particularly in the world of “Mekubalim”, where they fool desperate and gullible people into parting with vast sums of money. I therefore think that your statement that “If they ask distraught people for obscene amounts of money or deeds to property that’s a dead giveaway right there” is the truer test than only testing their knowledge of Toras Hanigla.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Rabbi Tzion Menachem?! #1683749
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    “The Mekubal Mantra”, by an anonymous author:

    What should you give to your mekubal?
    Every dollar, every Rubel
    Every shekel, every lira,
    Sell your dishes, sell your dira
    Brachos, brachos they will bring
    Go hock your spouse’s wedding ring
    Brachos come to all our givers
    You have no cash? Go sell your livers
    Give us euros and you’ll merit
    Bill Gates croaks and you inherit
    Gimme, gimme all your moolah
    And I’ll pray for your segulah
    We’re gatekeepers of G-d’s castle
    Grease our palms; you’re in, no hassle
    Some are skeptics, that’s so tragic
    How can you doubt mekubal magic?
    Your destiny we are controlling
    Your payments get the brachos rolling
    In the future (which we can foresee)
    You’ll transfer all your cash to me

    I’m not the author, but am sharing with the author’s permission.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Rabbi Tzion Menachem?! #1683487
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Why does YWN keep on accepting advertisements that this person, a supposed “miracle worker”, is coming to town? Doesn’t YWN have any standards?

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: What Chabad Meshichism and Anti-Vaxxism Have in Common #1627951
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Oh, boy…

    an Israeli Yid

    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    ZD – you state that “It takes a couple of hours to go through security and get your stuff”. I can tell you that most commuters or other frequent travelers take far shorter. I know that when I’m scheduled to land in Israel on Friday afternoon, I will not take checked luggage, so no wait there, and as an Israeli citizen with an electronic passport card, it takes me less than three minutes to clear passport control. As such, it’s generally 15 minutes or so from when the door of the plane opens until I’m outside, getting into the taxi I’ve pre-arranged to have waiting for me. Total time from when we land until I’m at home? Generally about an hour or so.

    Based on the above, and given business requirements, I am OK with taking flights that are scheduled to land on Friday afternoon, though I always make contingency plans in case there are delays – whether in the US. in Europe when on a connecting flight, or in case we land in Israel close to Shabbos. B”H I’ve not had to use them yet (it’s been close, but I made it), but I know the risk of getting stuck and accept it. The main failure of El Al in this story is that they gave no or wrong information to passengers, thereby not enabling them to make informed choices – but to just say “how could anyone fly at 6:00 PM on a Thursday” is just ridiculous.

    an Israeli Yid

    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    El Al’s policy is not to fly on Shabbos, and in fact, the flight that was diverted to Athens did NOT fly on Shabbos (the other flight was given a Psak to continue). As long as one is prepared to be stuck in an airport over Shabbos if necessary, why should someone – who for various reasons, can not fly on Wednesday – not take a Thursday flight?

    There are a significant number of Israelis who are “commuters” – their families are in Israel, while they work in the US (or Europe), who fly home for Shabbos every week. For people like that, leaving Wednesday is not an option. So please, don’t be so judgemental about the situation.

    an Israeli Yid (who frequently flies on Thursday night, with emergency supplies in my hand luggage)

    in reply to: who is "The Gadol Haddar" of America #1626012
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    DrYidd and Laskern make good points, particularly Laskern’s quote from Pirkei Avos. Note that it says “asei lecha rav” – you should pick your Rav, i.e., one who is appropriate for you. So long as there is no Sanhedrin whose decisions are binding on Klal Yisrael, the whole concept of “everyone needs to follow the Gadol Hador’s view” is a fallacy.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Election Results 2018 — Republicans Do Better Than Expected #1618851
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    A little closer to home (for those who live in New York) – how does the Democratic takeover of the NYS Senate impact Simcha Felder? He single-handedly gave the Republicans control of the Senate over the past several months, even though he’s officially a Democrat. Now that the Democrats are in control and don’t need him, how likely are they to take revenge?

    Not good for the Frum community.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Tipping Camp Waiters #1602771
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Sorry, Syag – you were and continue to be out of line in your assumptions about me. There was a clearly-implied assumption about my “lack of sensitivity” to others due to not understanding how you or ohters live. I resent your assumptions, and your inability to understand this makes continuing this conversation pointless.

    I will therefore not respond to your other points – though there are answers to them.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Tipping Camp Waiters #1602526
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Syag – you clearly have a different view, and are not going to be convinced. I continue to believe you are incorrect, particularly when (a) the camp says up front that it is expected to tip the waiters amount X, and (b) the waiters are not only not paid by the camp, they are actually charged for the privilege of working there, with the expectation that the tips received will cover that amount. I suppose the camp could have just raised the fee by $50 per camper and then not charged the waiters, but would that really put parents in a different place? This way, there is an incentive for the waiters to provide good service, and there will always be some individuals who tip more than the recommended amount – so there is an upside for the waiters as well.

    As to your comment that I don’t know how you live – you are correct. You also don’t know how I live now, and under what circumstances I grew up – so your comment is really out of line. We are two anonymous individuals on the internet commenting on a general issue, and we should make sure to convey our views logically and respectfully.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Tipping Camp Waiters #1602438
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Syag – a couple of points:

    1. This was a learning camp, with the campers all age 13/14 and up. There were no counselers, and hte Rabei’im were not tipped. The waiter was the only one who was tipped ($30 for half a summer, $50 for the full summer).

    2. The cost of this camp was significantly less than most, as they were far from a “luxury” camp – the focus really was on the learning.

    3. The camp clearly included mention of the tips in the information package that was sent to campers/parents before the summer. This was not a surprise sprung on campers at the last minute.

    4. There were clearly some campers who had no ability to tip at all, or who were only able to tip a minimal amount (I recall one person giving me $5 for the full summer). I can not have a ta’ana against someone like that – and in fact, I was told that I could count the tip that I “should have” received from such a person against my ma’aser obligation.

    5. It is so common to need to tip staff that it should be taken into account in determining your budget for camp.

    6. I have more than a clue as to what life is like for “most of the Frum population”. I was working at camp as I otherwise could not go – waiters at that camp were essentially regular campers with a job on the side. We attended Seder and Shiurim with everyone, but had to come a bit late/leave a bit early to set up and clean up the dining room, had much less free time, and had to bolt down our meals so that we could do our jobs properly – but that was something we did it so that we could be in a proper learning environment for the summer.

    So while I sympathize with you to an extent, there is another side to the story…

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Tipping Camp Waiters #1602330
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    I worked as a waiter in a learning camp when I was youinger. The camp charged me for the summer, albeit a reduced fee – however, the only way I was able to cover even that reduced fee was using the $$$ I received in tips – and the camp knew this. The camp also put out that Rav Yakov ZT”L had said that not tipping the waiter in camp was a form of Gezel, as the tip was expected at the time the work was done.

    I can truly say that to this day, decades later, I can still recall several individuals who did not tip – as well as several specific individuals who were particularly generous. One thing that really sticks in my mind is one of my tables where one of the guys had worked as a waiter himself a few years earlier. That table in particular was generous in tipping, and the former waiter came over to me to ask me to let him know if anyone there had not tipped, as he’d approach them about it – he said that since he’d been in that position hiself previously, he knew how hard we worked and how much it stung when no tip was given.

    I can say that even now, years later, I remain sensitive to those who rely on tips, and tend to tip more generously than most (even when it was a financial strain), since I know how much it means to them.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Tipping Waiters/Waitresses Properly #1601249
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Although tipping is technically optional, it is expected unless the services was particularly poor. In fact, tipping is so standard that there are laws that take this into account – whether it is the law that allows a lower minimum wage for waiters since there is a presumption that they will receive an additional amount as tips, or the fact that waiters have to include a certain percentage of the bill for tables they serve in their taxable income, since it is presumed that a tip for at least that amount was received – and as tips are often paid in cash, it would otherwise be easy for the waiter to just not report and pay tax on such income.

    So yes, tipping wait staff properly is not only an issue of being a “mentch” – if you don’t do so, you’re litterally taking money away from such staff.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Holocaust survivor became atheist #1506911
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    JJ2020 – a perfect example of this is Elie Wiesel’s “Prayer for the Days of Awe” –

    A Prayer for the Days of Awe
    By Elie Wiesel
    Published: October 02, 1997
    Master of the Universe, let us make up. It is time. How long can we go on being angry?
    More than 50 years have passed since the nightmare was lifted. Many things, good and less
    good, have since happened to those who survived it. They learned to build on ruins. Family life
    was re-created. Children were born, friendships struck. They learned to have faith in their
    surroundings, even in their fellow men and women. Gratitude has replaced bitterness in their
    hearts. No one is as capable of thankfulness as they a
    re. Thankful to anyone willing to hear their
    tales and become their ally in the battle against apathy and forgetfulness. For them every moment
    is grace.
    Oh, they do not forgive the killers and their accomplices, nor should they. Nor should you,
    Master of t
    he Universe. But they no longer look at every passer

    by with suspicion. Nor do they
    see a dagger in every hand.
    Does this mean that the wounds in their soul have healed? They will never heal. As long as a
    spark of the flames of Auschwitz and Treblinka glow
    s in their memory, so long will my joy be
    incomplete.
    What about my faith in you, Master of the Universe?
    I now realize I never lost it, not even over there, during the darkest hours of my life. I don’t
    know
    why I kept on whispering my daily prayers, and those one reserves for the Sabbath, and for the
    holidays, but I did recite them, often with my father and, on Rosh ha

    Shanah eve, with hundreds
    of inmates at Auschwitz. Was it because the prayers remaine
    d a link to the vanished world of my
    childhood?
    But my faith was no longer pure. How could it be? It was filled with anguish rather than fervor,
    with perplexity more than piety. In the kingdom of eternal night, on the Days of Awe, which are
    the Days of Jud
    gment, my traditional prayers were directed to you as well as against you, Master
    of the Universe. What hurt me more: your absence or your silence?
    In my testimony I have written harsh words, burning words about your role in our tragedy. I
    would not repeat
    them today. But I felt them then. I felt them in every cell of my being. Why did
    you allow if not enable the killer day after day, night after night to torment, kill and annihilate
    tens of thousands of Jewish children? Why were they abandoned by your Crea
    tion? These
    thoughts were in no way destined to diminish the guilt of the guilty. Their established culpability
    is irrelevant to my ”problem” with you, Master of the Universe. In my childhood I did not expect
    much from human beings. But I expected everyt
    hing from you.
    Where were you, God of kindness, in Auschwitz? What was going on in heaven, at the celestial
    tribunal, while your children were marked for humiliation, isolation and death only because they
    were Jewish?
    These questions have been haunting me
    for more than five decades. You have vocal defenders,
    you know. Many theological answers were given me, such as: ”God is God. He alone knows
    what He is doing. One has no right to question Him or His ways.” Or: ”Auschwitz was a
    punishment for European Je
    wry’s sins of assimilation and/or Zionism.” And: ”Isn’t Israel the
    solution? Without Auschwitz, there would have been no Israel.”
    I reject all these answers. Auschwitz must and will forever remain a question mark only: it can
    be conceived neither with G
    od nor without God. At one point, I began wondering whether I was
    not unfair with you. After all, Auschwitz was not something that came down ready

    made from
    heaven. It was conceived by men, implemented by men, staffed by men. And their aim was to
    destroy n
    ot only us but you as well. Ought we not to think of your pain, too? Watching your
    children suffer at the hands of your other children, haven’t you also suffered?
    As we Jews now enter the High Holidays again, preparing ourselves to pray for a year of peace
    and happiness for our people and all people, let us make up, Master of the Universe. In spite of
    everything that happened? Yes, in spite. Let us make up: for the child in me, it is unbearable to
    be divorced from you so long.
    Elie Wiesel, a professor in th
    e humanities at Boston University, was awarded the Nobel Peace
    Prize in 1986.

    in reply to: Holocaust survivor became atheist #1506743
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    Joseph – the Satmar Rav ZT”L may have said that, but this particular incident took place with the Klausenberger (not the Bluzhever as I’d said previously). Who is to say two Gedolim can’t have the same thought?

    In any case, the point I made stands – those who went through that and kept their Emuna are worthy of our utmost respect – but we can not judge those who lost their Emuna there.

    an Israeli Yid

    in reply to: Holocaust survivor became atheist #1506339
    anIsraeliYid
    Participant

    In the book Lieutenant Birnbaum, Meir Birnbaum relates how he became close to a Rebbe (I think the Bluzhever, but I could be wrong) after the war when he was serving in the DP camps. When the Rebbe was given permission to go to the US, while Lt. Birnbaum was still remaining in Europe, Lt. Birnbaum asked the Rebbe whom he should go to for Brachos, now that the Rebbe would not be near him. The Rebbe responded, “When you go into a Shul and see a man wrapping his Tefilin over a tattooed number – go over and ask him for a Bracha. Anyone who went through the hell of the camps and still puts on Tefilin is someone worthy of having his brachos answered.”

    So no, I don’t judge. I can only look in awe at those who went through that and stayed Frum, and thank G-d that I was not so tested.

    an Israeli Yid

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